Alexander Pope's Contributions to Literature Essay

Alexander Pope's Contributions to Literature Essay

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Alexander Pope born May 21, 1688 in London to a Roman Catholic family. Plagued in early age with Pott’s disease which caused his abnormal four foot six inch height. Pope wouldn’t be expected to amount to much yet was a critical attribute to literature. He was best known for his satirical verse and heroic couplet. Pope is also the third most quoted writer in the oxford dictionary of quotations behind William Shakespeare and Alfred Lord Tennyson. Pope influenced literature through his poetry, identifying, and refining his own positions as a critic and a poet.
Besides Popes importance to literature his life was very complicated. He struggled with health as his disease gave him a hunchback and many complications with it such as high fevers, respiratory difficulties, abdominal pain and inflamed eyes. With his abnormal height and all his various health issues also caused social problems. For example, Pope for the majority of his childhood was alienated. Another issue was the Test Acts that supported the Church of England. This stopped Catholics from voting, teaching, and attending universities. Even with these obstacles Pope was taught to read by his aunt and attended catholic schools which were illegal but allowed in certain places. In 1700 his family was forced to move to Popeswood, in Binfield, Berkshire because of statute preventing Catholics from living within 10 miles of London. This new countryside that he was in was near Windsor Great Park. Pope later on in his career create a poem named Windsor forest in which he would describe the countryside in his area. “Thin trees arise that shun each other's shades. Here in full light the russet plains extend”.
Thus Pope’s formal education was short lived. With the knowledge he had b...


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... artificial and hollow life, painted with a humorous and delicate satire. Pope’s satire is intellectual and full of wit and epigram. And it is quite true that no other poet or writer could depict the contemporary society so vastly and perfectly as Pope did and hence, he is regarded as the true representative poem of the 18th century English society.
In any event, Popes involvement in literature is beyond important as he influenced literature in multiply ways through his satire. Pope influenced literature by his poetry, identifying, and refining his own positions as a critic and a poet. Though he was ill throughout his entire life he found a way to become one of the greatest poets of the 18th century. He also helped to mold a new way of thinking began to expand the mind of his readers. Alexander Pope was a poetic genius and is one of history’s greatest writers.

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