Essay about Alexander Pope

Essay about Alexander Pope

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Alexander Pope was one of the greatest poets of enlightment during the Augustan period and one of the major influences on English literature (Alexander Pope Biography, 2011). He was an English essayist, critic, and satirist best known for his work and heroic couplet poems (Liukkonen, 2008). Alexander Pope wrote more proverbial lines than any other poet other than Shakespeare (Macy, 1961). Pope had a lot of passion for what he did and he wanted his readers to view poetry how he viewed it. Not to reduce from the strength of thought but to increase the happiness of the language (Bloom, 2005). His poems elevate the art of poetry from love verses to penetrating reflections on the nature of human psychology and creative inspiration (Untermeyer, 1969).

Alexander Pope was born on May 21, 1688, in London, England. Alexander was the only child born to Alexander Pope, a Roman Catholic who was a linen merchant. Pope’s mother was Edith (Turner) Pope who belonged to a Yorkshire family, which divided along Catholic and Protestant lines. Pope spent most of his early years spent at Binfield and recalled this period as a golden age. This is when he got his nickname “The Little Nightingale” (Hubeart, 1997). Pope never had children because he was never married. He only valued a friendship with Lady Mary Wortley Montagu but never pursued it (Liukkonen, 2008).

Pope’s father, the son of an Anglican vicar, had converted to Catholism causing the family many problems. The reason why is because at this time Catholics suffered from repressive legislation and prejudice. Catholics were not allowed to enroll in universities or hold employment. This made it impossible for Pope to have a successful education that was often interrupted. He was ex...


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...). After he moved to Twickenham and his father pasted he remained a Catholic and his collected works were published making him one of the first professional poets to be self-sufficient as a result of his non-dramatic writings. There he studied horticulture and landscape gardening. During his last years Pope created a romantic “grot” in a tunnel, which linked a waterfall to his backyard. (Alexander Pope Biography, 2011). Pope died on May 30, 1744. He left his property to Martha Blount. His friend whom he had a long lasting relationship with. His last epic poem, Brutus was left unfinished (Liukkonen, 2008). With the growth, and history of Romanticism Pope poetry Pope’s work was rediscover and his quality of imagination, satiric vision, and inspiring use of classical models made Alexander Pope one of the best poets to live (Alexander Pope Biography, 2011).

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