AIDS: The Modern Epidemic Essay

AIDS: The Modern Epidemic Essay

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AIDS: The Modern Epidemic

When we speak on the taboo subject of AIDS, many questions arise. First of all where did this wretched disease come from, what is it, who has it, and who can contract it? AIDS has terrorized the world for over 20 years and yet there is still no cure. In its short existence it has become one of the most rapidly spreading diseases in the history of mankind. The question regarding AIDS is, “will there ever be a cure?” Scientists may never be able to answer that question. Modern diseases including AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome), usually don’t constitute as being “new.” A more accurate term would “unfamiliar.” Researchers say this mainly because there is always a possibility that the disease existed, changing and conforming without recognition until it becomes too much for the body to fight off. It is at this point that the bacteria or virus is recognized as a disease. It is improbable that AIDS can be traced to its immediate source, but scientists are sure that the disease is derived from central African nations Zaire, Burundi, Ugandi, Rwanda, Tazania, and Kenya. Abundant in these regions are a species of monkey called the African Green, which carries a virus similar in structure to that of AIDS. These monkeys are not susceptible to the disease due to the fact that they have developed an immunity to it. Because of this characteristic they may have been carrying the virus long before it became known to humans. By studying every aspect of this
disease, including all theories of its origin researchers become one step closer to finding a cure for HIV/AIDS.
Another common questions is how humans contracted the AIDS virus? The answer is quite simple, monkeys were often sold by the natives,...


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...uted AIDS theory dies its final death. Science 292:615.
Curtis, T. 1992. The Origin of AIDS. Rolling Stone issue 626 (19 March): 54-59+.
Dicko, M., A.-Q.O. Oni, S. Ganivet, S. Kone, L. Pierre and B. Jacquet. 2000. Safety of immunization injections in Africa: Not simply a problem of logistics. Bulletin of the World Health Organizations 78:163-169.
Hochschild, A. 1998. King Leopold’s Ghost: A Story of Greed, Terror, and Heroism in Colonial Africa. New York, Boston: Houghton Mifflin.
Hooper, E. 2000. The River: A Journey to the Source of HIV and AIDS. Boston: Back Bay Books.
Korber, B., M. Muldoon, J. Theiler, F. Gao, R. Gupta, A. Lapedes, B.H. Hahn, S. Wolinsky and T. Bhattacharya. 2000. Timing the ancestor of the HIV-1 pandemic strains. Science 288:1789-1796.
Kyle, W.S. 1992 Simian retroviruses, polio-vaccine, and origin of AIDS. The Lancet 339:600-601




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