The Age Of Innocence By Edith Wharton Essay

The Age Of Innocence By Edith Wharton Essay

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The “Gorgeous Incongruities”: Polite Politics and Public Space on the Streets of Nineteenth Century New York, shows the reader the major differences between modern day New York City and Nineteenth Century New York City. In Nineteenth Century New York, the streets were used to parade social class ranking, as well as to in some ways judge those who walk the streets, which is depicted in the first few sentences of the article. However, when one goes into the city today, it couldn’t be any more different. It’s not about how rich someone is, or how poor someone is. Quite frankly people today could care less about those around them.
The article, The “Gorgeous Incongruities”: Polite Politics and Public Space on the Streets of Nineteenth Century New York, written by Mona Domosh, starts off by talking about the main character of The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton. The main character, Ellen Olenska, is almost immediately deemed an outsider upon her return to New York from Europe. With her, she brings a man who goes by the name Julius Beaufort, who according to the author is a “man of questionable virtues”.
In addition, Domosh then goes on to state how Wharton’s streets of nineteenth century New York show very minimal resemblance to that of the more recent images of the modernizing city. It seems that in Wharton’s images of the city everyone cares about what other people are up to. Where as, now when one walks around the city there is very little interaction, and very little caring of what others are doing. People who are in the city now very rarely care about the actions of those around them. “Edith Whartons characters were not free in their behavior on the streets of New York; they were intensely guarded in their displays, aware al...


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...rticle talks about the building of the business of America due to Wall Street. This, I believe, is very true. It is because of Wall Street that New York has been called the most economically powerful city, as well as the leading financial center of the world. Without the addition of Wall Street in the Nineteenth Century, I don’t think that New York would be the city it is today.
The City has changed tremendously since the nineteenth century, and it will continue to evolve as years go on. It has been build up more and more with the addition of Broadway, Times Square, Fifth avenue, and Wall Street. Be it most of these are tourist places. In my opinion, New york for the most part has become mostly tourist attractions compared to what it used to be, a runway for showing off one’s social status. I believe that between then and now the city has done a complete one-eighty.

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