African Americans During World War II Essay

African Americans During World War II Essay

Length: 2057 words (5.9 double-spaced pages)

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Many African Americas participate in the U.S. Air Force today, but before World War II they were segregated from joining. They had very few rights and many believed they did not have the same talents as whites Americans. These men wanted to make a difference by fracturing racial stereotypes in society; they wanted to prove that African Americans had talents and strengths just like other Americans did. African Americans came together in Tuskegee, Alabama to form the Tuskegee Air Force group and fought to change negative racial perceptions. African Americans learned from teachers on how to properly fly with the right techniques. Americans looked African Americans differently because of their race and background in society, but they wanted to change this. For example, America had all-white drafts and segregated African Americans from joining the military. The Tuskegee Airmen found many ways to gain the attention and support of fellow Americans and ones in the White House. African Americans used their talents and abilities to strive for success and invalidate stereotypes. The Tuskegee Airmen accomplished their main goal of breaking racial stereotypes by gaining support and help from others to inspire them. The Tuskegee Airmen of World War II transformed racial perceptions throughout the U.S. military by breaking stereotypes, gaining attention from the White House, and advancing African Americans in society.
The Tuskegee Airmen changed racial perceptions by achieving goals in combat and winning important medals. They broke stereotypes by winning against their strongest enemies and destroying the tactics of these enemies. These Airmen fought many enemies in war including the Germans and they proved to many white Americans that they h...


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...men did not fracture racial stereotypes during World War II then where would African Americans fit in society today? Before the war, African Americans never had the chance to fight for American or fly a jet. They had to fight segregation that occurred during the war, but never gave up. The Tuskegee men opened up opportunities for African Americans to benefit their nation and show their hidden strengths. Many Americans supported them through their journey to break stereotypes and accomplish their goal. African Americans raised their education levels because of the continuous support from other Americans to break stereotypes. Without the strong support from ones in the White House, the Tuskegee Airmen might never have gotten the opportunity to join the Tuskegee Institute. Today, African Americans have the Air Force because of the Tuskegee Airmen and their legacy made.

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