The adventure of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Essay

The adventure of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Essay

Length: 988 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain focuses on the institution of slavery in the South. Twain further satirizes different institutions in the book, including religion. Twain ultimately accentuates superstition more than religion. Mark Twain’s emphasizing superstition seeks to provide protection, hope, and moral growth for the underclass.
The superstitions that ensue in the novel exist to protect Huck and Jim. The occurrence of a distressing spider superstition provides warning to Huck. Huck listens to the sounds from the woods because he is unable to fall asleep while “a spider went crawling up his shoulder, and he flipped it off and it lit in the candle . . . that was an awful bad sign and would fetch him some bad luck.” (Twain 6) The evident misfortune affiliated with the spider superstition ultimately warns and protects Huck from an impending misery. Huck realizes his desire for protection, especially from Pap. A salt superstition a few days later intensifies Pap’s imminent recurrence. One morning Huck “happened to turn over the salt-cellar at breakfast” he then “reaches for some of it to throw over his left shoulder and keep off the bad luck.” (Twain 19-20) The dreadful superstition escalates the approaching misfortune of Pap’s reappearance, which ultimately heightens Huck’s desperate need for protection, and allows Huck to be one-step ahead of Pap. Furthermore, an ominous bird superstition enables Jim to prepare for a calamity. As Huck finds food, he notices “some young birds flying a yard or two a time”, Jim asserts, “it was a sign it was going to rain and said it was death.” (53-54) Jim’s superior knowledge of superstitions prevents Huck from killing a bird, which is presumably an adversity, and ultimately pro...


... middle of paper ...


...when he decides not to talk about the situation and think of another plan instead. This skill becomes extremely valuable to Huck because of the decisive decisions Huck must make throughout the novel. Although Huck believes the snakeskin is good luck in the beginning, the continuous misfortune and instability ultimately permit Huck to grow morally, from committing childish behaviors to becoming decisive and mature.
Mark Twain’s emphasized superstition seeks to provide protection, hope, and moral growth for the underclass. Superstition ultimately replaces religion and becomes the main belief of the novel’s underclass. Humans ultimately follow their beliefs in order to become more successful, acquire protection, and avoid conflicts in life.



Works Cited

Twain, Mark. The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. 1884. Evanston, Illinois: McDougal Littell, 1997. Print.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Essay examples

- The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn written by Mark Twain is a novel depicting an era of southern society and environment and the ignorance of southernism opposition to slavery. It is written in southern dialect and seen through the adventures of two boys from different societies running away from civilization. The author bases the novel on the conflict between civilization and natural life. Throughout the novel, Twain seems to suggest that the uncivilized way of life is better: his belief is that civilization corrupts rather than improves human beings (etc,etc,etc)....   [tags: Mark Twain Huck Finn]

Free Essays
1041 words (3 pages)

The adventure of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Essay

- The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain focuses on the institution of slavery in the South. Twain further satirizes different institutions in the book, including religion. Twain ultimately accentuates superstition more than religion. Mark Twain’s emphasizing superstition seeks to provide protection, hope, and moral growth for the underclass. The superstitions that ensue in the novel exist to protect Huck and Jim. The occurrence of a distressing spider superstition provides warning to Huck....   [tags: superstition, slavery, religion]

Better Essays
988 words (2.8 pages)

Deceit and Trickery in The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain Essay

- Deceit and trickery can be lifesavers. In the, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, deceit and trickery are essential traits in Huck’s life. Huckleberry Finn is a young boy living in the South in the late 1800s. Being in such a racist environment, Huck is not prevented from associating himself with African Americans. When Huck runs away from home, he runs into one of his own family’s slave who is escaping. Huck soon befriends the slave named Jim and both of them travel on a raft to the North seeking freedom....   [tags: slave hunter, ]

Better Essays
856 words (2.4 pages)

The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn Essay

- “When I was a child, I talked like a child, I thought like a child, I reasoned like a child. When I became man, I put my childish ways behind me (NIC: 1Corinthians 13:11) In the life of every individual, there are various events and stages, such as death, crime, overcoming fear and undergoing moral growth, which transform immature individuals into serious and mature people. In Mark Twain’s novels, The Adventure of Tom Sawyer and The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn, one sees this transformation and growth in the two main characters by facing conflicts and events, these being Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn In beginning of the novel The Adventure of Tom Sawyer, one sees Tom as a crafty, intell...   [tags: Literary Analysis, Mark Twain]

Better Essays
1304 words (3.7 pages)

The Final Adventure Of Huckleberry Finn Essay

- As Huck and Jim's journey progresses, the river, which once seemed a paradise and a source of freedom, becomes merely a short-term means of escape that pushes Huck and Jim further toward danger and destruction. Jim was captured but Huck broke him out to that so-called freedom once again. Now, they were now on their great quest lighting out for the west, but they knew something was out of its nature. They noticed the current of the river picked up out of no where, something that looked like the beginning of a tsunami....   [tags: Mark Twain Huck Huckleberry Finn]

Free Essays
1037 words (3 pages)

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain Essay

- The book The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain was published in 1884 and influenced by the author’s personal experiences and thoughts during that time period. Along with The Adventure’s of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain also wrote its predecessor The Adventures of Tom Sawyer. The novels became some of Mark Twain’s most popular novels. Twain was one of the most loved authors of his time and his novels are now considered American Classics (Mark Twain Biography). “A gifted raconteur, distinctive humorist, and irascible moralist, he transcended the apparent limitations of his origins to become a popular public figure and one of America’s best and most beloved writers.” (Mark Twain, His...   [tags: Mark Twain, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn]

Better Essays
1171 words (3.3 pages)

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain Essays

- The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain, is an academically acclaimed American novel that is well known within the country. Even though, most readers are unaware that it is one of the top novels that is banned in most academic curriculum across the country due its explicit racial controversy. The context within the novel has had to be re-written to suit the delicate views of some readers. Even though it is an extraordinary story, the time in which the novel was written is that of a time were the language was just acceptable....   [tags: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain]

Better Essays
1645 words (4.7 pages)

Essay on The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain

- Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain once said, “ The men that does not read has no adventure over the men who cannot read.” Adventures of Huckleberry Finn was written by Mark Twain about Huck 's adventure after he faked his death. Huck learns about lying, drunkenness, violence, racism, and the distortion of high society as he goes along the river with Jim. The novel is an apprehension of a racial aspect since Jim is a black salve and is seem unworthy to be Huck 's friend by society....   [tags: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, Mark Twain]

Better Essays
1105 words (3.2 pages)

The Adventure of Huckleberry Finn Essay

- Often throughout a person’s life negative and positive influences are infused into one’s mind through friends, and family. In Mark Twain’s novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, the lead character, grows up under the guidance of three different adult views on how a boy should behave. Huck, the lead character, learns helpful and damaging life lessons from the Widow Douglas, Miss Watson, Jim, and pap. To begin with, the Widow Douglas and Miss Watson are two wealthy sisters who adopt Huck. Thw two sister’s want to teach Huck the importance of religion, manners, and behaving....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Mark Twain]

Better Essays
1092 words (3.1 pages)

The Adventures Of Huckleberry Finn By Mark Twain Essay

- Why should any person be deemed to a life of civilization. Isn 't life made for adventure and freedom. In Mark Twain 's novel, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, a life of civilized superiority is thrown away for adventure and a search for freedom. For Huckleberry Finn, civilization and society are just big words used for one 's own pleasure. Huck rejects civilization over and over again because nothing right can come out of a society where one 's morals only seem to be used in a certain place at certain times....   [tags: Adventures of Huckleberry Finn]

Better Essays
1522 words (4.3 pages)