Essay on Actions of the Lakota People at Wounded Knee

Essay on Actions of the Lakota People at Wounded Knee

Length: 1476 words (4.2 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Powerful Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

The Lakota people of the Sioux Indians have a colorful and violent history. Around 1890, there was a massacre near Wounded Knee Creek, South Dakota in Lakota territory, which was perpetrated onto the Lakota by members of the US Calvary. Almost one hundred years later, in 1973, the American Indian Movement took over the same town of Wounded Knee for 71 days, until the US Marshal Service succeeded in wresting control of the town back into the hands of the United States. To understand how this conflict arose, and why the Lakota acted this way, it must first be explained how and why the Lakota were so inclined to take over the area.
The Lakota, like many Indian tribes in modern day America, were effectively contained within their own ‘nations’, which the US restored their original sovereignty over, albeit in a much reduced state of sovereignty, as they are still beholden to the United States in many ways, and are considered “domestic dependent nations”, rather than being nations completely foreign to the US. Within these nations, there are many issues, such as alcoholism and very low employment rates, as well as an extreme degree of poverty. Alcoholism is especially rampant in many Indian territories, with the rate of alcoholism related death being over four times as high as the national average. (Fraiser, Pg 73) The high rate of alcoholism is incident with the poverty and low employment rates. In addition to high alcoholism, the nation exhibit suicide rates higher than the national average as well. Both the poverty and low employment rates are due to a few factors, many of which were perpetuated by the United States Government. The main historic cause of this destitution is the land upon which the Indians were given the reserv...


... middle of paper ...


...y of Ocosingo. Aggression ended ten days later, when a ceasefire was negotiated. Much of their land was retained in Zapatista control for a year, before a surprise breach of ceasefire was conducted by the Mexican military a year later. Eventually, in 2001, a new party won the presidential election, and meetings with Zapatistas were conducted, with the Zapatistas rejecting the government’s ideas for peace, and retreating back to their own territory, where they continue to operate autonomously.
Parallels can be drawn between the actions of AIM and the Zapatistas, in as much as that both the Zapatistas and AIM sought to end their troubles with the government through occupation of government controlled territory. The key difference between the two movements is that the Zapatistas didn’t fail, and have lasted almost twenty years with control of their own territory.


Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on The Roles of the Characters in “Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee”

- The video “Bury my Heart at Wounded Knee,” tells the story of being pushed onto reservations in the Midwest and Black Hills negotiations. The main characters include Charles Eastman, Red Cloud, and Sitting Bull. These characters each play a significant role in capturing the emotional state of life among the governing agencies and tribal members. Charles Eastman survived the Little Big Horn Valley Battle of June 1876. He was being raised by family and tribal members until his father of newly Christian beliefs came to take him onto a reservation to learn in their school system....   [tags: tribes, leader, resistance]

Powerful Essays
668 words (1.9 pages)

Black Elk and the History of the Lakota Native American Essay

- ... After gold was discovered in the Black Hills, Chief Crazy Horse led a resistance against General George Crook in 1876. After Crook’s defeat, Chief Crazy Horse had his men join the central group of Sioux Native Americans led by Sitting Bull. It was at that campsite near the Little Bighorn River that the Sioux Native Americans defeated General George Custer. But soon after, Chief Crazy Horse was captured and accidentally killed (“ Black Elk”). This led to a shift of Sioux Native Americans which ultimately led them to the Pine Ridge Reservation....   [tags: injured, war, suffering, treatment]

Powerful Essays
680 words (1.9 pages)

Native Americans Essay

- Wovoka received a message that was said to come from God. In order for this vision to come true, they had to do a round dance that had a leader to lead the ceremony and they made a circle to dance a ritual for five days. If the ceremony is performed the wild game would come back and evil would be erased from the earth. They also had to agree to live peacefully with the white man, love each other, not fight, must work, no stealing or telling lies and abandon the old tradition of war and self mutilations....   [tags: ghost dance,wovoka, lakota indians]

Powerful Essays
872 words (2.5 pages)

The Wounded Knee Massacre Essay

- The Wounded Knee Massacre was final result of the growing problems between the Lakota Sioux and the American Government. After the Civil War tension began to escalate and ended on December 29, 1890. When the government took over most of the Lakota land and forced them into reservations the Indian way of life was destroyed and the large bison herds were hunted until they were endangered. The life in reservations was also difficult since many of the promises made by the government remained unfulfilled: “Promises to increase rations, made by U.S....   [tags: Lakota Sioux vs American government]

Powerful Essays
1237 words (3.5 pages)

Analysis of Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee Essay

- Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee:  An Analysis Dee Brown's Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee is a fully documented account of the annihilation of the American Indian in the late 1800s ending at the Battle of Wounded Knee. Brown brings to light a story of torture and atrocity not well known in American history. The fashion in which the American Indian was exterminated is best summed up in the words of Standing Bear of the Poncas, "When people want to slaughter cattle they drive them along until they get them to a corral, and then they slaughter them....   [tags: Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee Essays]

Free Essays
708 words (2 pages)

Essay The Story of Wounded Knee

- “What have the ‘hostiles done. It seems to be so far a white man’s war” (Qtd. in Hines 30). The Indians that were killed at Wounded Knee committed no crime on their reservation in the time before the battle (Hines 36), they only practiced religion. The Ghost Dance movement resulted in a massacre at Wounded Knee which had a lasting impact on many people. The religion of the Ghost Dance started with a man named Wovoka. On January 1, 1889, he had a ‘vision’ during a solar eclipse in Nevada (Peterson 27)....   [tags: Native American Massacre]

Powerful Essays
2623 words (7.5 pages)

Essay about Lessons Learned From the Massacre at Wounded Knee

- Introduction The massacre at Wounded Knee was the last action in a long and bloody war that pitted Native American Indians against U.S Military forces. For roughly 300 years the two sides had been in constant conflict across America in a battle for land, resources, and ultimately; freedom. This final massacre solidified the American hold on the west and closed the final chapter on a way of life that can never be brought back. Lakota Indians, having learned of the death of Sitting Bull started to move towards Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in hopes of finding protection from Red Cloud....   [tags: Lessons from the Indian Wars]

Powerful Essays
2450 words (7 pages)

Wounded Knee Essay

- Wounded Knee Wounded Knee was a terrible event in US history. It showed how the US government didn't understand the Native Americans and treated them badly and unfairly. Big Foot was the chief of a subtribe of the Lakota called Miniconjou. He was very old and had pneumonia. He was taking his tribe to the Pine Ridge Reservation in south-western South Dakota. Most of the women and children in Big Foot's tribe were family members of the warriors who had died in the Plains wars. The Indians had agreed to live on small reservations after the US government took away their land....   [tags: American America History]

Free Essays
721 words (2.1 pages)

Wounded Knee:The Ties of Religion and Violence Essay

- Wounded Knee: The Ties of Religion and Violence On the morning of December 29, 1890, many Sioux Indians (estimated at above two hundred) died at the hands of the United States Army near Wounded Knee Creek on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The Indians were followers of the Ghost Dance religion, devised by Wovoka, a Paiute prophet, as a spiritual outlet for Indian repression by whites. The United States Army set out to intercept this group of Native Americans because they performed the controversial Ghost Dance....   [tags: Indian Religion Religious History Essays]

Powerful Essays
3114 words (8.9 pages)

Essay on Lakota Woman

- Lakota Woman Essay In Lakota Woman, Mary Crow Dog argues that in the 1970’s, the American Indian Movement used protests and militancy to improve their visibility in mainstream Anglo American society in an effort to secure sovereignty for all "full blood" American Indians in spite of generational gender, power, and financial conflicts on the reservations. When reading this book, one can see that this is indeed the case. The struggles these people underwent in their daily lives on the reservation eventually became too much, and the American Indian Movement was born....   [tags: Mary Crow Dog]

Free Essays
1161 words (3.3 pages)