Essay on A Women's Right to Vote in Britian

Essay on A Women's Right to Vote in Britian

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Women had a tough time in the mid 1800’s; in Britain in Particular. They had hardly any rights, could only work certain jobs, and could not vote. Women should have had more right, or just as equal rights as men had. Men were sexist against women; they did not think women could achieve the standards men were held to. It mostly occurred in the lower class, but the lower class and upper class were victims al well. These women were not the wealthiest, but they also were not the poorest, they fell somewhere in between, or average.
Although women had very little rights, they fought for the rights they wanted and some would not stop until they earned them. Out of all rights, woman most wanted suffrage, or the right to vote. In my opinion, women should have always had the right to vote. Millicent Fawcett led a movement known as The National Union of Women’s Suffrage Societies (Lewis, pg. 1). She led this movement to get woman what they all wanted, voting rights. Once argued “Political power in many large cities would chiefly be in the hands of young, ill-educated, giddy, and often ill-conducted girls” (Rylands, pg. 1). These statements later led to a former suffragist, Emmeline Pankhurst create a social and political union. She was a huge impact on what gave women the right to vote. She was part of many movements that led to women’s suffrage. Later the nineteenth amendment was passed on August 18th, 1920 granting all women the right to vote (Cornell University, Pg. 2). Voting is an important right. It is important because all humans should have a say in something that will later be important to his or her city or community. To have it a person has to be responsible and take things seriously. Women were looked at differently once they wer...


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... the way they were it is not fair. It is not like they did anything. It was just decided and that was that. It took much longer to get rights than it was to establish that women should not have rights. Women like Lucy Stone and Susan B. Anthony are really inspiring women for standing up and fighting for what they believe in. Look what ended up happening because of these important people. There was an amendment passed for women to vote, we can work mostly wherever we want, there is no segregation between man and woman. Women don’t only work in the house and clean and take car of the children, if so it is their choice. They are making their own money now, living on their own property. This is what should have happened long before when it did, but hey I’m glad it did. I don’t know where we would be without the important women who impacted the way women live today.




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