A Satire Of Voltaire 's View Of War And Battle Essay

A Satire Of Voltaire 's View Of War And Battle Essay

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Morgan Allen
History 105
11/22/15
WAR
War has been a vital part of living since the beginning of time, by the study of History one can see the ways war has developed over the years. By examining three different sources of various battles one begins to see not only the physical, but also the mental and emotional tolls it takes on the people involved. Throughout history we see the gradual change in war with the advances of critical thinking, war skill, weaponry and the willingness to push the limits. During times of crisis some find themselves experiencing things they would have never experienced physically and psychologically.
In the story Candide written by Voltaire, we see a satire of Voltaire’s view of war and battle. Candide, the main character, is forced into a war between the Bulgarians and the Abares. While Candide takes a walk, the Bulgars find him thinking he is fleeing the war. Candide then describes his experience after given the choice to either die or accept horrible punishment, “punishment was so far composed of four thousand strokes, which had laid bare every muscle and nerve from his neck to his backside. (Candide 20)” Throughout the book Candide goes on to explain many different situations where he finds himself at war. He explains the evils it brings upon the lives of people. The book is a satire as Voltaire criticizes war, but in an underlying way shows attacks on his enemies. This book was written to portray catastrophe and loss due to the remanence of war. Between the scenes of burning villages and innocent dying people, Candide begins to mentally break. The book focuses on the battles that physically happen but also explain the inner battle Candide finds within himself. You find throughout the novel that ...


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...p building armies to invade multiple power sources and dropping horrific bombs on innocent people. The term Total Warfare is coined for targeting innocent people in church and hospitals. The goal of warfare has yet to change. As the years go on war evolves and becomes more devastating to those involved.
















Works Cited
Lualdi, Katharine J. "The Great Depression and World War II/ Eyewitness Accounts of the Bombing of Guernica." Sources of the Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures. 4th ed. Vol. 2. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2009. 246-49. Print.
Lualdi, Katharine J. "World War I and Its Aftermath/Fritz Franke and Siegfried Sassoon, Two Soldiers’ Views (1914-1918)." Sources of the Making of the West: Peoples and Cultures. 4th ed. Vol. 2. Boston: Bedford/St. Martins, 2009. 226-29. Print.
Voltaire, and Lowell Bair. Candide. New York: Bantam, 1959. Print.

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