A Critique / Synthesis Of The Following Articles Essay

A Critique / Synthesis Of The Following Articles Essay

Length: 1028 words (2.9 double-spaced pages)

Rating: Better Essays

Open Document

Essay Preview

Ghida Al Kharfan
Mrs. Nina Shalhoub
English 204- Section ll
15 March 2016

A Critique/Synthesis of the following articles: “Salt in the wound: Will India rise up against the oppression of foreign clinical trials” by Glenn McGee and “Call to Check ‘Unethical’ Drug Trials in India” by Rahul Verma.
In his article “Salt in the wound: Will India rise up against the oppression of foreign clinical trials” written in April 2006, Glenn McGee, the director of the Alden March Bioethics Institute at Albany Medical College, argues that the abuse of the poor people in India by western pharmaceutical industries approaches a kind of “imperialism”. Moreover, Rahul Verma, in his article “Call to Check ‘Unethical’ Drug Trials in India” written in 9 February 2004, criticizes the Indian government for allowing its people to become the guinea pigs of the world’s clinical trials. Both authors’ main purpose is to inform the readers about the unethical drug trials and to persuade Indians to stop enrolling in such trials and the government to impose the needed regulations. Even though western pharmaceutical companies are not the only ones to blame here, they still play a major role in using poor societies and controlling the immoral drug trials in India.
McGee compares the British imperialism that happened in March 1930 to the incident of the outsourced clinical trials in India, stating that the same imperialism is trying to rule again. He claims that such trials are creating a business that aims at supporting pharmaceutical companies in other countries. Furthermore, the number of people willing to enroll in India exceeds the one in the United States where the cost of the trials is double that of India. McGee argues that the illiterate Indian population ...


... middle of paper ...


... enter clinical trials, not pharmaceutical industries.
McGee’s article portrayed important and significant information about the issue. He presented his opinions clearly and achieved his purpose in notifying the readers about the impacts of the drug trials and in persuading them and convincing them of his thoughts. McGee’s arguments were realistic, strong and influential. That made his attitude towards clinical trials totally right and acceptable. Nevertheless, the Indian population and the government could also hold some blame in the flow of clinical trials in India; it is not only the fault of the pharmaceutical companies around the world. When they become more aware and cautious about this issue, then they will be able to defeat this imperialism.








Works Cited
Glenn McGee, The Scientist, April 2006
Rahul Verma, OneWorld South Asia website, 09 February 2004

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

Essay on Critique of Three Journal Articles on Substance- Abuse Prevention

- New Directions For Substance- Abuse Prevention In the article, New Directions For Substance- Abuse Prevention (2011), Anderson (2011) stated that his main purpose was to describe the problem of substance abuse among college students, discuss strategies that have already been in effect, discuss ways in which college campuses can be more effective in prevention and finally, discuss what things campus leaders should know, say and do in order to help with substance abuse prevention. The article starts of discussing the nature and significance of the substance abuse problem among college students....   [tags: article critique]

Better Essays
3055 words (8.7 pages)

How to Write a Synthesis Essay

- A synthesis is a written discussion that draws on one or more sources. It follows that your ability to write syntheses depends on your ability to infer relationships among sources - essays, articles, fiction, and also nonwritten sources, such as lectures, interviews, observations. This process is nothing new for you, since you infer relationships all the time - say, between something you've read in the newspaper and something you've seen for yourself, or between the teaching styles of your favorite and least favorite instructors....   [tags: Synthesis Essays, Argumentative Essays]

Free Essays
841 words (2.4 pages)

How to Write a Synthesis Essay

- The main purpose of a synthesis essay is to make insightful connections. Those connections can show the relationship(s) between parts of a work or even between two or more works. It is your job to explain why those relationships are important. In order to write a successful synthesis essay, you must gather research on your chosen topic, discover meaningful connections throughout your research, and develop a unique and interesting argument or perspective. A synthesis is not a summary. A synthesis is an opportunity to create new knowledge out of already existing knowledge, i.e., other sources....   [tags: Synthesis Essay]

Free Essays
1666 words (4.8 pages)

How to Write a Synthesis Essay

- What is a synthesis essay. A synthesis essay draws on two or more sources and combines their ideas into a coherent whole. What do I need to write one. Writing a successful synthesis essay will require you to do four things: read accurately and objectively, see relations among different viewpoints, define a thesis based on these relations, support the thesis effectively. You will not discuss all the points in every essay; but you should use every essay assigned, and you should use points from each that are appropriate for the thesis of your own essay....   [tags: Synthesis Essay]

Free Essays
510 words (1.5 pages)

Writing a Synthesis Essay

- A synthesis essay should be organized so that others can understand the sources and evaluate your comprehension of them and their presentation of specific data, themes, etc. The following format works well: The introduction (usually one paragraph) 1. Contains a one-sentence statement that sums up the focus of your synthesis. 2. Also introduces the texts to be synthesized: (i) Gives the title of each source (following the citation guidelines of whatever style sheet you are using); (ii) Provides the name of each author; (ii) Sometimes also provides pertinent background information about the authors, about the texts to be summarized, or about the general topic from which the...   [tags: Synthesis Essay]

Free Essays
442 words (1.3 pages)

Critique of The Final End of The Wicked by Edward Fudge Essay example

- Critique of The Final End of The Wicked by Edward Fudge The Final End of The Wicked written by Edward Fudge tries to give us the contrasting side of the argument between the wicked’s final destruction and the never-ending conscious torture. The author talks about the ever feared eternal punishment that is bequeathed with the wicked. He presents his article with a very simple understanding to the readers which position he is supporting. He restates his opinion which says the idea of unending torture is merely an irreligious view based on assumption and not in scripture....   [tags: Article Critique]

Better Essays
678 words (1.9 pages)

Essay on Science Of Desire Article Summary and Critique

- Summary The article The Science of Desire presents ethnography and its proponents play an important role in modern business world. Author Ante began with an example, the satellite-radio war, to show how ethnography worked in business. In satellite-radio war, Sirius Satellite Ratio made a team of social scientists, designers, and ethnographers. Through studying customers’ habit of listening to music, watching TV and reading magazines, the team concluded several facts that can defeat competitors....   [tags: Article Analysis Critique]

Free Essays
1247 words (3.6 pages)

Essay on Critique of an article from the Journal of Applied Physiology

- Critique of an article from the Journal of Applied Physiology "Effect of different protocols of caffeine intake on metabolism and endurance performance" Introduction In 2002, a group of Australian researchers published a paper entitled the "Effect of different protocols of caffeine intake on metabolism and endurance performance". Caffeine use during sporting events has become much more popular and has widely studied. The purpose of the research was to examine the work increasing (ergogenic) effects of differing regiments of caffeine on metabolism and performance while simulating the typical nutritional preparation an athlete would do for a race....   [tags: Physiology Journal Article Critique]

Better Essays
1108 words (3.2 pages)

Critique of Two Journal Articles on Motivation Essay

- Critique of Two Journal Articles on Motivation Expectancy theory is one of the most widely used motivation theory. It is first proposed by Victor Vroom Yale School of Management in 1964. This theory is well supported by many evidence, and believe that the degree how people would act in a certain way depends on the strength of an expectation that the act will be followed by a given outcome, and on the attractiveness of that outcome to the individual.(Robbins et al. 2008) Two research-based articles which used expectancy theory to examine the factors impact target object in different circumstances are compared in this critique article....   [tags: Motivation Theory Article Analysis Compare]

Better Essays
1411 words (4 pages)

How to Write a Synthesis Essay

- A synthesis is the combination of the ideas from more than one source with your own ideas. Note that the term “idea” does not constitute an opinion. What does a successful synthesis include. ACCURACY: an accurate report of information from the sources using different phrases and sentences not found in the original text. ORGANIZATION: readers should be able to see immediately where the information from the sources overlap. INTERPRETATION: a synthesis makes sense of the sources and helps the reader understand them in greater depth....   [tags: Synthesis Essays, Process Essays]

Free Essays
345 words (1 pages)