A Brief Treatise On Societal Transformation Essay

A Brief Treatise On Societal Transformation Essay

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PART TWO – SOCIETY

A BRIEF TREATISE ON SOCIETAL TRANSFORMATION
Mankind’s foremost fallacy lies in its misconception of society. Mankind consistently treats “society” as an undeniable truth—a fixture of the species—and upholds the status quo. However, as Berger and Luckmann would agree, society has never been anything more than a man-made invention—a valiant attempt to establish stability within a chaotic world. Despite man’s initial beneficent intentions, society as an ideal has been tremendously bastardized due to humanity’s divisive socio-cultural influences—i.e., the B&L-ian notion of socio-cultural variability. In fact, some followers of Jung contend that the sociology of culture acts as any given individual’s first confrontation in the world. Additionally, such divisiveness propagates arbitrary projections resulting from the isolation of socio-cultural groups. Arguably, at least initially, man somewhat succeeded in creating stability in the face of chaos, only to continue on such a trajectory as to create a new form of chaos as a result of man’s self-interest and stupidity. As mankind sought to organize society in order to combat anarchic chaos, the decay of entropy crept in, dragging society back into the abyss. Hypothetically, society can transform and once again be made anew if the individuals within it collectively accept the chaos of reality and, in turn, actively resist any chaos created by any man or sub-group. When undergoing a successful societal transformation, current institutions must be de-reified; then re-socialization can begin, and ultimately mankind can internalize habitual prioritization of this new reality’s maintenance.
First, man’s predisposition towards societal interaction must be established as ...


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...t importance to constantly reaffirm the integrity of the prestige hierarchy. Cognitive authority and propagatory power in self-interested hands invariably results in a re-establishment of concrete notions in accordance to the visions of that authority. Additionally, rationality must be maintained when looking to assess and redefine institutions, particularly concerning the sciences and social mores. Pertaining to widely accepted certified knowledge, which stems from the prestige hierarchy, it is essential to remain aware of metaphysical assumptions when accruing certified knowledge, as this knowledge will be propagated and will act to educate subsequent generations. Asserting a sense of rationality is key to society’s functionality in the sense that it dissuades a return to any extremely rigid adherences to society as a concrete entity yet it also seeks equilibrium.

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