Preview
Preview

Women in European History Essay

:: 2 Works Cited
Length: 1833 words (5.2 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Blue      
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »



- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Women and Communal Strikes in the Crisis of 1917 - 1922
An interesting fact concerning the protests by working class in the period during and succeeding WWI was not initial demands for revolutionary change or worker’s rights, but instead forcing government to provide basic life necessities of food and shelter during times of rationing. Though there were differences in geography and outcomes, the goal was the same in demanding survival over social and economic change. The politicization of these movements did not occur until their male counterparts, who did hold memberships in unions and radical political groups, sympathized with their female equivalents and participated in these marches did violence or government crackdowns occur. It was because of politics that these women avoided the idea in order to elicit sympathy and avoid ferocious reprisals against them.
The organization of these marches ties into the community structure of working-class women. Though these events seemed to occur at random, they shared a few common characteristics. The communities these women resided were usually near their or husbands/fathers/brothers/male companions workplaces and also government facilities. Another was the close bonds formed amongst them through interactions in work, markets, churches, and other public areas of gathering Whether it was babysitting for neighbors’ children or each other, working-class omen held more deeper solidarity than women of higher class standings. Though food shortages were frequent occurrences, when women sought to march for better access to feed themselves outside communities gave sympathy that they deserved these privileges. Men did form groups to gain attention on working-class rights and political reform; s...


... middle of paper ...


...d reintroducing traditionalistic female roles of motherhood and submissive attitudes towards men. Finally in connection with the textbook, it does mention the lives of women under Fascist Italy while for German women in the Nazi regime fails to mention their political contributions to the party and focuses only on Nazi economic policies that affected women.


Works Cited

Kaplan, Temma. "16 - Women and Communal Strikes in the Crisis of 1917 - 1922." Becoming Visible: Women in European History. Ed. Renate Bridenthal, Claudia Koonz, and Susan Mosher. Stuard. 2nd ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. 428-49. Print.

Koonz, Claudia. "19 - The Fascist Solution to the Women Question in Italy and Germany." Becoming Visible: Women in European History. Ed. Renate Bridenthal, Claudia Koonz, and Susan Mosher. Stuard. 2nd ed. Boston: Houghton Mifflin, 1998. 498-533. Print.


Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Essay European History - Societal Roles of Eighteenth Century Women - European History - Societal Roles of Eighteenth Century Women   Throughout European history, women have struggled endlessly to become the intellectual and social equals of their male counterparts. After hundreds of years of physical labor, housekeeping, child rearing and many other difficult tasks, women’s attitudes about their place in life began to change. In the last few years of the eighteenth century (after tough and troubled decades) possible beginnings of early women’s rights were born when society began to evaluate the education and potential of women as a social class....   [tags: European Europe History]
:: 3 Works Cited
1498 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Periods of European History that Demonstrated Changing Attitudes Towards the Education of Women - Periods of European History that Demonstrated Changing Attitudes Towards the Education of Women Throughout the early portion of modern European history, women were never encouraged to undertake any significant education. Though the problem lessened over time, it was still a strong societal force. There were three major time periods when substantial changes took place in attitudes towards women's education -- the Renaissance, the Reformation, and the Seventeenth and the early Eighteenth centuries....   [tags: European Europe History] 504 words
(1.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Were Pre-Modern European Witchhunts Mysogynistic? - Were the witch-hunts in pre-modern Europe misogynistic. Anne Llewellyn Barstow seems to think so in her article, “On Studying Witchcraft as Women’s History: A Historiography of the European Witch Persecutions”. On the contrary, Robin Briggs disagrees that witch-hunts were not solely based on hatred for women as stated in his article, “Women as Victims. Witches, Judges and the Community”. The witch craze that once rapidly swept through Europe may have been because of misconstrued circumstances. The evaluation of European witch-hunts serves as an opportunity to delve deeper into the issue of misogyny....   [tags: european history, witches] 1099 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Women In Victorian Era Essay - During the Victorian era, women were viewed as the very opposite of what a man ought to be. In the words of John Stuart Mill, who published a criticism of the way society differentiated between males and females "The female sex was brought up to believe that its ‘ideal of character’ was the very opposite to that of men’s ‘not self-will , and government by self-control, but submission, and yielding to the control of others" to live for others; to make complete abnegation of themselves, and to have no life but in their affections.’” (171) Basically, women were expected to be sweet, docile, and man’s perfect helpmate....   [tags: European History] 1349 words
(3.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Roles of Women in Medieval Scandinavia Essay - When people think about Medieval Scandinavia they usually think about a cold northern region inhabited by a warrior people who spend all of their time sailing around in Viking warships and plundering from one another or going to war with their neighbors. While our archaeological evidence from this period may be rather scarce, many cite the Scandinavian pagan religions as a evidence of this warrior society due to the fact that men were encouraged to fight in order to be chosen by the gods to live in Valhalla, the pagan equivalent, loosely equivalent, of heaven....   [tags: european history, world history]
:: 8 Works Cited
4026 words
(11.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Victorian Men and Women's Fears of Educating Women Essay - Victorian fears of educating women were addressed in Martha Vicinus' novel, Independent Women. However I think that one very important issue not discussed in by Vicinus was the joint and separate fears of men and women of educating women. I also think that these fears were not realized entirely in her book and during the Victorian period. In order to determine if their fears were realized we need to look at the individual fears and also apply whose fears they were. I will examine the three view points that I think had the greatest fears and realizations of educating women; men and women together, then men and women's separate fears....   [tags: European History] 1065 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Women's Literacy During the Middle Ages Essay - During the Middle Ages, women were considered to be inferior to men and were not formally educated. It was common for women to be unable to read and write in their own language. Even though some were fortunate enough to be taught how to read, some were still unable to write. Women were not usually taught how to read Latin, the language of male scholars and people of the Church, who also happened to be male. In the later Middle Ages, even most nuns were not able to learn Latin. Partially literate women became increasingly common in the later Middle Ages; but very few women were given the opportunity to learn to read and write....   [tags: European History]
:: 5 Works Cited
651 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Changing Women's Roles as a Result of the Black Plague - When Eve took that bite of the Forbidden Fruit, she had no idea what she had gotten women-kind into. Whether or not you believe in the story of creation, the perception of women as corrupting and sinful had shaped women's social roles in Western Society for thousands of years. Augustine was one of the first to write about the wickedness of women, and the acceptance of this doctrine is evident in the Letters of Abelard and Heloise through their disdain toward marriage. Along with mass death of the Black Plague, came an opportunity for women to change the ways in which society viewed them....   [tags: European History] 833 words
(2.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Role of Women in the Social Transformation of England Essay - Role of Women in the Social Transformation of England The traditional idea of movement that changes the world is global movement: the explorers and adventurers that sailed around the world, the people who moved and colonized new lands. Michael Adas in Machines as the Measure of Men stated that the ideas that drove the European colonization were the "products of male ingenuity and male artifice" (14). Most of the exploration and first colonization was done by men. It would not have been socially correct for women....   [tags: European Europe History]
:: 2 Works Cited
1187 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Eighteenth Century Women Playwrights Essay examples - The following essay gives a short biography of eight of the most well known women playwrights of the eighteenth century. The essay runs in chronological order by each playwright’s birth date and describes the better known accomplishments of each playwright. The playwrights that I have included in this essay are: Mary Delariviere Manley, Mary Griffith Pix, Susanna Carroll Centlivre, Catherine Trotter Cockburn, Eliza Fowler Haywood, Elizabeth Griffith, Hannah Parkhouse Cowley, and Elizabeth Simpson Inchbald (Benedict 2003)....   [tags: European Europe History]
:: 8 Works Cited
2612 words
(7.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]