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Views on Overseas Expansion in 19th Century America Essay

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Arguments for and against overseas expansion raised a foreign policy debate in the late years of the 19th century to the early years of the 20th century. People favored overseas expansion because they wanted the American economy to grow. Missioners, who wanted to convert the inhabitants of the new lands, also propelled this new policy, and theories such as the Social Darwinism and the Manifest Destiny made people believed it was right for America to expand its frontiers and help the less fortune. But there were some who disagreed with overseas expansion because they looked at it as a hypocrisy act among Americans, or as a way of subjugating other nations just for America’s benefits. Some others were concerned that making contact with under-developed nations would eventually dilute their racial stock and the strength of America.
At the end of the 19th century the growth in population and in production led many people to look outward. By expanding, America would ensure that there would always be access to foreign markets for America’s surplus products to be sold. To fuel America’s industrial economy, people found expanding very beneficial. Overseas territories offered a cheap labor force allowing American goods to be made at a lower cost and were full of natural resources and raw materials, which could be very useful in American manufacturing. These foreign territories could serve as possible coaling stations for the battleships, or as military basis. Many businessmen found very advantageous this idea because they saw it as investment opportunities. They were willing to use their surplus capital to invest in the mines of Philippines or to start producing in Hawaii because they knew this would give them higher returns that investin...


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...also disagreed in subjugating other nations just because America thought is was superior, and there were some who did not want to see their blood mixed up with those of inferior cultures.



Works Cited

Brody, David and Henretta, James A. America a Concise History volume 2: Since
1865. Boston MA: Bedford / St. Martin’s, 2010. Print.
"Imperialism, 1890-1914 (Overview)." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2010. Web. 19
Feb. 2010. .
Lewis, Chris H. “The Spanish- America- Philippino War.” Colorado.edu. University
of Colorado at Boulder, 07 Aug. 2002. Web. 18 Feb. 2010.
"Spanish-American War." American History. ABC-CLIO, 2010. Web. 19 Feb. 2010.
.
Williams, William. “Non-Self Governing Territories.” Reader’s Companion to
American History, (1991): 364. Print.


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