Essay Color Key

Free Essays
Unrated Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers




Water Pollution Control

Rate This Paper:

Length: 802 words (2.3 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Red (FREE)      
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Contaminants Threatens Wells, DEP Concludes

Issue Statement

The contamination of public water wells in Monmouth and Ocean County can lead to negative long terms effects and put a major impact on the cost for water filtration. The accumulation of polluted water being produced in the area requires additional treatments making our county limited to our expenses.

Discussion

Many water wells in the state of New Jersey in addition to those in Monmouth and Ocean County have been susceptible to pollution. Some experts say, including the DEP commissioner, that the problem is not whether water coming out of your tap is safe. The real issue is the cost to put in addition treatments into the water therefore making it safe for every element where water is required and utilized. Though, updates have shown that drinking water itself is becoming unsafe and insecure for residents to consume as well.

Several conditions play a part in the pollution of water through the state. Whether it’s storm runoffs, leaky storage tanks, or harmful waste dump sites, these all have an effect on the high bacteria levels in the water. Keeping the pollution to a minimal is not the easiest thing in the world to do. Pesticides, petroleum products, corrosive or ignitable toxins are some examples of hazardous materials that are found in water today. The major water pollutants are chemical, biological, or physical materials that degrade water quality. Residents in Brick Township, Lakewood, Jackson Millstone, Freehold Township, Howell and Wall are some of the many local areas that are affected. Those organizations that are responsible for replenishing the water such as the New Jersey American Water Co., Monmouth and Lakewood systems, United Water Toms River, Brick Township Municipal Utilities Authority and New Jersey American's Mount Holly system will probably be required to face these challenges and obstacles with a different strategy compared to the previous procedures.

Life threatening circumstances have occurred in the past that reminds us what could happen to our water supply if we do not maintain it. Situations like the Cuyahoga River on fire, or the Potomac River too dirty for swimming, or Lake Erie dying. Since these incidents have happened environmentalists have taken extreme measures to reduce the amount of pollution that is coming out of the power plants that are on the river and on Lake Erie. Public awareness and concern for controlling water pollution led to enactment of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972. In the United States, the serious campaign against water pollution began in 1972, when Congress passed the Clean Water Act. This Act or law began a national campaign to stop any pollution to any lakes, rivers, streams, wetlands, and coastal waters. The law also required anyone or any companies that discharge pollutants into waterways to apply for federal permits and to be responsible.

The statistics show that although Monmouth and Ocean do have excessive amounts of contaminants every water source in the entire state of New Jersey is affected. The article specifically says, “As of summer 2003, New Jersey had 606 community water systems that serve residences with a total of 2,237 wells and 64 surface water intakes. The systems serve about 7.5 million people. 77 percent of the drinking water sources statewide were rated highly susceptible to contamination from at least one kind of contaminant.” These remarkable numbers are the main influence on efforts to protect our water from future mishaps.

Water pollution control techniques are applying quality monitoring and other scientific studies performed by the Agency in cooperation with state. Popular methods of controlling contaminants and pollution can start from simple treatments in water from homes, businesses and industries. Experts say the an effective approach would be zoning ordinances to control activities and development, preserving and conduct classes or have several programs which will instruct you how to successfully participate in waste management.

Summary

The recycling methods to produce clean water are a crucial and vital aspect of our environment. Having contaminated water in your area can cause many devastating effects. The continuous procedures could bring forth several outcomes that can affect our every day lives. The replenishing of water will become costly in the nearby future if reports continue to show excessive amounts of contaminants in the water. Whether it is streams, rivers, lakes, or the ocean, the state needs to take great measures to maintain a high quality of water source for both human consumption and as a key component to the environment.

References

Bates, T. 2004. Contaminants Threaten Wells, DEP Concludes. Asbury Park Press. Monmouth and Ocean Counties, NJ. Section: A, Page: 01

EPA.gov. Thursday Feb. 20th, 2003. Clean Water Act. Http.//www.EPA.gov/regions5/water/cwa.htm. January 30, 2003

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Water Pollution Control." 123HelpMe.com. 30 Sep 2014
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=95907>.








Important Note: If you'd like to save a copy of the paper on your computer, you can COPY and PASTE it into your word processor. Please, follow these steps to do that in Windows:

1. Select the text of the paper with the mouse and press Ctrl+C.
2. Open your word processor and press Ctrl+V.

Company's Liability

123HelpMe.com (the "Web Site") is produced by the "Company". The contents of this Web Site, such as text, graphics, images, audio, video and all other material ("Material"), are protected by copyright under both United States and foreign laws. The Company makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the Material or about the results to be obtained from using the Material. You expressly agree that any use of the Material is entirely at your own risk. Most of the Material on the Web Site is provided and maintained by third parties. This third party Material may not be screened by the Company prior to its inclusion on the Web Site. You expressly agree that the Company is not liable or responsible for any defamatory, offensive, or illegal conduct of other subscribers or third parties.

The Materials are provided on an as-is basis without warranty express or implied. The Company and its suppliers and affiliates disclaim all warranties, including the warranty of non-infringement of proprietary or third party rights, and the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. The Company and its suppliers make no warranties as to the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the material, services, text, graphics and links.

For a complete statement of the Terms of Service, please see our website. By obtaining these materials you agree to abide by the terms herein, by our Terms of Service as posted on the website and any and all alterations, revisions and amendments thereto.



Return to 123HelpMe.com

Copyright © 2000-2014 123HelpMe.com. All rights reserved. Terms of Service