Wealth


Length: 864 words (2.5 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Excellent
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Text Preview

More ↓

Continue reading...

Open Document

Throughout the world, there is a dramatic difference in the wealth of nations. Twenty eight percent of the entire worlds population controls eighty percent of the worlds wealth, leaving the remaining twenty percent of wealth to be divided among the remaining seventy two percent of the population. Since the wealth of a nation is comprised of several different aspects, it can be determined why certain nations in the world have larger amounts of wealth than other nations. The amount of wealth of a country differs diversely along with birthrate, life expectancy as well as income. Each of the factors greatly contributes to the gross national product per capita and the wealth of the nation in general. Per capita wealth is a measure of the gross national product of a country divided amongst all of the population, those who do not work included.

Countries with high populations, but with low gross national product have smaller per capita wealth than a country with the same gross national product, but a lower population would have. Unfortunately, it is most often the countries known as "third world" who have some of the lowest per capita wealth in the world. Population increases and a standstill in gross national product would lead to a lower per capita wealth, while a zero population growth and increase, or even a standstill in gross national product would lead to a higher per capita wealth, which in many of the developing countries, would be a great thing, allowing some hopefully to leave the constant threat of extreme poverty, in which they constantly face life. The birth rate of countries is another factor which influences the wealth of a nation.

Countries with higher birth rate are most often countries that have limited medical care, and high populations. When a country has limited medical care, more people die from diseases that are easily cured in richer nations. Epidemics spread rapidly, knocking out families as well as entire villages. More children are born because with the ease in which they die, it is necessary for more support in the home. In Afghanistan, where there is extreme and bitter poverty, the average number of children born to a woman is almost seven. In the United States and Japan, the birthrate is at if not lower than zero population growth.

In these countries there would be a decrease in population leading to more wealth per capita, but in countries with increasing population and quite often decreasing gross nation product, the per capita income would decrease even more from the already pathetic point.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Wealth." 123HelpMe.com. 19 Nov 2017
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=94677>.
Title Length Color Rating  
Effects of Sudden Wealth on the Winners Essay - “A fool and his money are soon parted” (Unknown) people who are lucky enough to become suddenly rich will only ruin their life in the long run, either by winning a lottery, having a successful investment, or just claiming an inheritance, with these categories there are same effects: bothering charities, filing for bankruptcy within next five years, and unlasting happiness. Charities will often ask money through organizations, for sudden wealthy, charities wouldn’t leave them alone till they get the amount they want....   [tags: wealth,] 512 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
The Christian Belief on Wealth and Poverty Essay - Wealth, the state of being affluent which is a highly desirable characteristic in life and opposing this is poverty, the state of having little or no money and very few possessions. The Bible teaches us that wealth in your life is absolutely worthless in Heaven and holds no value under the eyes of God. This goes against almost every human’s attitude to earning more money to be content by a better lifestyle. Currently Christian leaders are heavily concerned of how corrupt the world is and believe the unfair distribution of wealth across the globe and how less economically developed countries have to suffer from this disadvantage, are the causes of our world being corrupt....   [tags: Christianity, Wealth, Poverty, religion, ]
:: 3 Works Cited
926 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay Wealth Management in the U.K. - Introduction This report covers several topic areas in wealth management such as what it seeks to achieve, how a wealth management firm is authorised, who may use this service, the alternative options for a client and the macro-economic environment and legislative influences. Wealth management Wealth management is a practice that best describes the combination of personal investment management, finance advice, and financial planning for the benefit of high-net-worth clients. Robert J. McCann, former President of Global Wealth Management at Merrill Lynch was quoted describing wealth management addressing “every aspect of a client’s financial life in a consultative and highly individualised ma...   [tags: Wealth Management Services]
:: 8 Works Cited
2370 words
(6.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Wealth Inequality in the US with Sociological Viewpoints - ... In 1971, if you were born to into the poorest 20%, you had a 9% chance of making it to the top 20% during your lifetime, and today, that chance remains unchanged. [7] What has changed is the difference between the top and bottom 20%. This is being driven by a number of factors, many of which bring contention between differing economist, politicians and analyst. Why is the wealth/income gap getting larger. The income gap has been widening partly because of globalization. A manufacturing worker is suddenly competing against third world country citizenry that will do the same work for a fraction of the wages....   [tags: distribution of assets, wealth or income]
:: 8 Works Cited
1100 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Comparative View of Wealth Accumulation in America - The era that marked the end of civil war and the beginning of the twentieth century in the united states of America was coupled with enormous economic and industrial developments that attracted diverse views and different arguments on what exactly acquisition of wealth implied on the social classes in the society. It was during this time that the Marxist and those who embraced his ideologies came out strongly to argue their position on what industrial revolution should imply in an economic world like America....   [tags: economic and industrial development, wealth]
:: 2 Works Cited
1058 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Greed and Wealth in the Characters of The Great Gatsby by F. Scott Fitzgerald - In today’s society, people are judged by their values or are frightened to take sacrifices to better benefit their lifestyle. Characters like Gatsby, Tom, Daisy and Myrtle are shown as evidence of greed and how wealth surrounds their values. Fitzgerald uses social commentary to offer a glance of an American life in the 1920s. He carefully sets up his novel into distinct groups, but in the end, each group has its own problems to contend with, leaving powerful ideas for readers to adapt(add morals characters inhabit)....   [tags: Wealth, Materialism]
:: 1 Works Cited
900 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations Essay - The pivotal second chapter of Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations, "Of the Principle which gives occasion to the Division of Labour," opens with the oft-cited claim that the foundation of modern political economy is the human "propensity to truck, barter, and exchange one thing for another."1 This formulation plays both an analytical and normative role. It offers an anthropological microfoundation for Smith's understanding of how modern commercial societies function as social organizations, which, in turn, provide a venue for the expression and operation of these human proclivities....   [tags: Wealth of Nations] 3049 words
(8.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Wealth Effect Essay - The Wealth Effect The "Wealth Effect" refers to the propensity of people to spend more if they have more assets. The premise is that when the value of equities rises so does our wealth and disposable income, thus we feel more comfortable about spending. The wealth effect has helped power the US economy over 1999 and part of 2000, but what happens to the economy if the market tanks. The Federal Reserve has reported that for every $1 billion in increase in the value of equities, Americans will spend an additional $40 million a year....   [tags: Wealth Effect Stock Market Economy Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
3906 words
(11.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Wealth Essay - Throughout the world, there is a dramatic difference in the wealth of nations. Twenty eight percent of the entire worlds population controls eighty percent of the worlds wealth, leaving the remaining twenty percent of wealth to be divided among the remaining seventy two percent of the population. Since the wealth of a nation is comprised of several different aspects, it can be determined why certain nations in the world have larger amounts of wealth than other nations. The amount of wealth of a country differs diversely along with birthrate, life expectancy as well as income....   [tags: essays research papers] 864 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Wealth Essay - Wealth “The Gospel of Wealth” written by Andrew Carnegie discusses the post Civil War industrial expansion era, a time that produced immense wealth for many business tycoons. Andrew Carnegia, an elite industrialist, created a very large wealth for himself during this time. Some of the elite industrialists tried to change their “robber baron image by curbing their often ostentatious lifestyles and seeking opportunities to enhance the community.” Andrew for one, decided that it was imperative for wealthy individuals to disperse their wealth throughout the society for the advancement of the community....   [tags: essays research papers] 464 words
(1.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]

Related Searches




Cultures that are more agrarian in nature can been seen as have higher birthrates than nations that are more industrialized. The reason being is that, when there are more bodies, more work can be done leading to an increase in any profit that might be made, Parents can also look forward to being supported by at least one of their children when they are too old to work and need to be cared for. Often the peoples of these low-income nations do not realize the complications of large families. With a large number of children, there is a tremendous amount of food needed even to just keep the children alive and in many of the countries, when daughters are sent off to be married, a dowry is expected.

Families might not be able to establish a "decent" dowry with an extraordinarily limited income and six or seven mouths to feed as well. When there is an increase in life expectancy, the population increases as well, because as people are growing older and older, not dying, and more and more children are being born. The average life expectancy in The United States is seventy six years. The United States is also one of the most advanced countries in the world. Advanced, of course referring to all of the technological, agricultural and medical abilities that can be demonstrated, and more importantly practiced due to the high wealth of the nation. There is a high per capita wealth, low to average birth rate, and one of the highest life expectancies in the world.

Advanced medical care makes this possible, and a large per capita wealth makes the experimentation as well as actual procedures possible. In the Congo, for example, the country is developing, if not third world and the average life expectancy is forty four, an age at which in more developed countries, people are at the mid point of life expectancy. This country also, does not have any semblance of health care as people in developed countries know. The startling trends of low gross national product per capita, high birth rate, and low average life expectancy all show why there is such a frightening difference between nations wealth around the globe. Wealthy countries, such as the United States, Sweden and Japan are industrialized, and have strong stable governments. Beyond the fact that countries in Africa, Asia and Europe can not be industrialized or have a lack of resources, is another key reason for the difference in wealth, political stability. The countries formerly part of the Soviet Union are young and have developing governments. African governments have never been stable


Return to 123HelpMe.com