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The Invisible Man by HG Wells

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The Invisible Man by HG Wells


Griffin - Wells goes in great detail about the way Griffin (the Invisible Man) looks and acts. He writes about Griffin's bad temper and his evil scheme of stealing money and food to survive as an invisible man. He makes the character, Griffin, realistic because his emotions, like expressing his anger through shouting, are something people are familiar with. Griffin was quick to anger by the taking of drugs and stimulants. What may have begun as quick temper and impatience turns into violent rage and a wish to commit murder. Griffin's deterioration is self-induced for the most part, but his alienation from his own kind is assisted by other human beings. Fear and superstition follow him, and it seems a defensive mechanism of humans to lash out and destroy the things they fear and do not understand.

Griffin had been a brilliant young chemist and researcher, confined and unappreciated as an instructor in a small English college. His brilliance had led him to investigations in physics and the properties of light. It is interesting to observe that as his passion for experimentation and his devotion to pure scientific investigations accelerated. When he required money to advance his experiments in invisibility, he stole it from his father.

He finds the possibility to make something invisible. He try's it with a cat and it works. So then he made himself invisible. As an invisible man he could steal, as much he wanted. He is chased by dogs, hunted down in a department store, nearly run over in the streets, and constantly subjected to the discomfort of exposure and he gets lots of head colds. He is a man caught in a trap of his own making. Then, of course, he is betrayed by the only person in whom he placed confidence.

Griffin's end is tragic, but it is the culmination of the tragic course he had followed since he first ventured into the unknown terrors of invisibility.

Mr. Thomas Marvel - Griffin meets a man named Marvel and wants him to be his servant. He is very scared and does what Griffin expects him to do at first, but when they come to Port Stowe, Marvel tells the barmen at the Jolly Cricketers' pub that the invisible man could be there. Marvel got the money and the diary of the experimental investigator. He has opened an inn, and tells everybody what has happened to him after that time, when there had been an invisible man. And every Sunday he takes out Griffin's notes and says that he wouldn't have done what the researcher did he'd just, well....

Kemp - He is an old fellow student of the invisible man. He is also a man of science. Griffin feels a bond with Kemp because they had attended the same university and are both men of science. Dr. Kemp is down to earth and, while perhaps not the inventive genius Griffin is, has maintained a sense of balance. Kemp, of course, is not a violent man, and he is quick to detect that Griffin's temper is a potentially dangerous thing.

At this point Griffin is a potential murderer, and the trust and confidence he places in Kemp only make that doctor's betrayal of that faith all the more difficult to accomplish in good conscience. But when the invisible man comes to him, he thinks he has gone completely mad and he wants to get rid off him. So the invisible man chases Dr. Kemp. But after a while the invisible man himself in chased by Kemp.

Mrs. Hall: She is the owner of the inn in Iping Village. She feels sorrow for the invisible man and wants to help him, but he refuses. After a time she can't stand the mystery anymore.


Setting

The invisible man decides to move to a town called Iping, where he takes up residence in the Coach and Horses inn in order to research. The Halls are the owners of
this inn. Mrs. Hall is a very curious lady and the reason why Griffin shows his invisibility. Things develop and all inhabitants of the town get to know that Griffin is
invisible. Where he is hunted.

The story takes place in the late nineteenth century early twentieth century. Both the time and place are important, because this story could not take place today. Towns are too big, people seem to be much more intelligent and the city would be an excellent place to hide.


Plot

This story is about a scientist called Griffin who made a brilliant invention. But not thinking of the result of this he is killed by people who where scared of him.

At first he comes to Iping a little town in England where he wants to stay in order to do research. Griffin found out how human beings could become invisible and that was one reason why he left home. He is not able to get visible again which will become a major problem of this man. When things develop the people of the town find out that Griffin is invisible and immediately he is a hunted creature. The invisible man meets Dr. Kemp whom he knows very well because they went to the same university. But Kemp wants him, like everybody, to be caught. At last the invisible man is killed in a struggle.

Dr. Kemp is the opposite of Griffin. He doesn't invent things himself. Griffin would never adopt an invention of somebody else. Mrs. Hall is a very curious person and she is the reason why he showed his invisibility. This dramatic ending would not have to be happened if society had accepted the invisible man. He just was a strange, not understood outcast. He was different.

There are some other problems that make Griffin's situation bad. He didn't realize what it meant to be invisible. He was not aware of the consequence of his invention. This leads me to the conclusion that scientists are men who can be very dangerous. Society plays an important part in the life of such a person who is regarded as an outcast by other people - very often or almost every time society is the reason for odd reactions of human beings.

Theme

     The most important theme is societies' ignorance. Society is always afraid of things that they do not understand. The reason they were so afraid of the invisible man was the fact that nobody could explain why he was invisible. The people of the town did not even give the man time to explain what had happened to him; everyone just started to chase him down. I believe that if the people would have been more open minded about his invisibility that the man might not have become crazy and killed in the end. Society cannot deal with things that cannot be explained. There was skepticism even after the man vanished and there were witnesses to it.

     The ignorance of the society also played an important role in assisting the invisible to become mad. Since the invisible man was somewhat of a freak of nature or science the people just wanted him to be gone. They did not want an explanation. They wanted the invisible man dead. After the people chased the invisible man out of the town he snapped and became totally crazy. This is when Griffin was going to go on his "reign of terror" and start killing judicially. The society could have prevented the whole disaster if they would have been more open and allowed for an explanation to be brought to their attention.
     
Evaluation

I expected a good book, because H.G. Wells is a great writer. My expectation came true, the book is slightly different, but it was great. The book can't be realistic because no human can make himself invisible. But it would be fun if it can be done. You can't compare it with other books, because this is an original idea.

I felt that H.G. Wells did a great job in creating this somewhat entertaining and believable novel. The book gave me some insight on the advantages of being invisible along with its harsher disadvantages. The Invisible Man can get almost any object he desires but he cannot enjoy them. He also has the problem of always getting run into and trampled upon since he cannot be seen.

The novel also showed me what a man who has been an outcast all his life and who was partly responsible for the death of his father is capable of doing and thinking.
Those bad times probably were the cause of his insanity, which led into his desire to become invisible and cause terror.

The part in the book that most impressed me is where the invisible man himself is hunted. All the aspects of the book are successful. I would advise others to read the book, because they would have an amusing time.

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