Importance Of Dream in Black Boy by Richard Wright


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     The author of the story “Black boy”, Richard Wright, expressed the theme, the

importance of dream by making readers relate to the situation in “Black Boy”. “Black

Boy” is about this little boy who writes a story and the story’s title causes this uproar

because it has the word hell in it. “ The Voodoo on hell’s half acre” is the title of the

story. The theme is importance of dream, and this theme relates to the story because the

main character had a dream. Stayed with that dream, and he didn’t let what others said

about him bother him.

     The theme importance of a dream relates to “Black Boy” because the boy decided

to go for his dream. His dream was to become a writer, as seen on page 431, the narrator

expressed that the boy woke up one day wanting to be a writer, and he then picked up his

composition book and he wrote the story. He showed a way on how go with that dream

and he had also had the courage to stay with that dream.

     Also, The character had stayed with his dream; this is shown on pages 432-434.

He had put so much time into that story that he took it to the editor himself. Once the

editor got it he wanted a response immediately. That shows that he stuck with his dream,

he wanted an immediate response from the editor. After that he wanted to know what was

he going to do with the story. The main character had a dream, and he didn’t care what

others said.

     Lastly, the main character in the story “Black boy” didn’t care what people said

about his 3part story. He even was hurt by his own grandmother, (as seen on pages 432-

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"Importance Of Dream in Black Boy by Richard Wright." 123HelpMe.com. 13 Dec 2017
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433) he even got disapproval from the teachers at his school, and his classmates were

asking him questions because they thought that he was telling a story when he said that

he wrote the story published in the local paper. In conclusion if you believe in the

importance of dream then it doesn’t matter if your criticized, you should still be able to

see the importance of dream in the story “ Black Boy”.


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