Flood of Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible


Length: 1107 words (3.2 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Excellent
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Text Preview

More ↓


 The Flood of Gilgamesh  

 Perhaps the most popular comparison with Noah's Flood is that of an ancient Babylonian story of a similar flood. A quick look at the text does show some key similarities between them however there are also some pointed differences. I will show you both and let you decide whether there is or is not a connection.
 

     First let us look at the similarities:

          *It is set in the Iraqi/Turkey area.....similar to the Biblical Flood.

          *A man is warned by a god to build a ship so he could survive a coming flood, sent by the divine powers.

          *The man is told to save himself, his family, and a sampling of all living things.

          *The boat was to be sealed with resin inside and out.

          *A set time is made by the divinity for the flood to begin.

          *The flood includes both rain and water from the surface.

           *The flood covered the mountains.

           *The boat came to rest on a mountain first.

           *Birds were released to test for whether or not the waters had receeded.  In the Biblical account, a raven and a dove were released. In the Gilgamesh account, a dove, swallow, and raven were released.

           *Once out of the boat, the man offers a sacrifice to the divinity which brings comfort to the divinity at the sweet scent of the sacrifice.
 
 

     Now for the differences:

           *The Babylonian tale never says why the gods chose to save the man in the story. It was pretty much dumb luck.  In the Bible, Noah was a rightous man amidst a population of evil.

           *The boat dimensions are quite different. The boat in the story of the Babylonian flood is a cube, equal on all sides. While in the Bible, Noah is told to build his Ark in a 450x75x45 ratio. This ratio is what is known to ship builders as the perfect ratio for stabilty for a boat but it was not known until the 15th century AD.  The Gilgamesh boat, being equal on all sides, would have been wildly unstable and unseaworthy.

          *The Babylonian man  took seven days to build his boat while Noah took 120 years. Why would such a numerology rich people use such a non-numerology number as 120 when seven was already in the story?

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Flood of Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible." 123HelpMe.com. 12 Dec 2017
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=8479>.
Title Length Color Rating  
Flood of Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible Essay - The Flood of Gilgamesh and Genesis   The Epic of Gilgamesh records a story of a world-wide flood and pre-dates Genesis. So some claim that this invalidates the Genesis record. But P.J. Wiseman presents an interesting theory in this regard in his book Ancient Records and the Structure of Genesis (New York: Thomas Nelson, 1985). He believes that Moses did not write Genesis but rather translated it from ancient stone tablets written in Cuneiform script. The tablets each would have been originally written by eye-witnesses of the particular events, or those who received their information from eye-witnesses....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays] 724 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible Essay - Epic of Gilgamesh and the Book of Genesis History tells us that since we have been able to write, our human race has had the habit of recording historical tales, or stories. Most of the first stories were tales of heroic men, scouring their land in search of some noble prize. These stories are known as epics, and they give us an excellent idea of the lifestyles and basic thought processes of early humans. Along the lines of these epics are the accounts told in the Bible, especially those in the Old Testament....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays] 993 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Problem of Woman in Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible - The Problem of Woman in Gilgamesh and Genesis The snake hands Eve the apple, and with a twinkle in her eye she bites  into the apple, gaining the elusive knowledge the serpent  has promised. With shame deep in her heart, Eve smiling offers the precious fruit to Adam, her mate. The prostitute lures Enkidu, protector of nature, into her arms with the fruits of her womanhood. She offers him sexual satisfaction. He like Adam is an innocent taken in by the wiles of a woman. Why do the women tempt the innocents....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1258 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Flood of Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible Essay - The Flood of Gilgamesh Perhaps the most popular comparison with Noah's Flood is that of an ancient Babylonian story of a similar flood. A quick look at the text does show some key similarities between them however there are also some pointed differences. I will show you both and let you decide whether there is or is not a connection. First let us look at the similarities: *It is set in the Iraqi/Turkey area.....similar to the Biblical Flood. *A man is warned by a god to build a ship so he could survive a coming flood, sent by the divine powers....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays] 1107 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Obedience and Arrogance in Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible - Obedience and Arrogance in Gilgamesh and Genesis The issue of obedience figures prominently in both "The Epic of Gilgamesh" and the book of Genesis in the Bible. These works were produced by very different cultures and traditions (Middle Eastern and Hebraic, respectively) and the characters in each react to authority or advice with very different levels of obedience. Noah is found to be righteous by God and is rewarded with a means to escape the devastation of the flood. Gilgamesh, in his arrogance, thinks himself to be above the mortal concept of death....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays] 1239 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Flood Myth of Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible - A Comparison of the Flood of Gilgamesh and the Bible People grow up listening to the story of Noah and the flood. They remember the length of the flood, the dove, and the rainbow very vividly. However, most people do not realize that the story is told throughout many different cultures and with accounts older than Genesis¹s version in the Bible. Although each of the accounts tells of the flood, there are many variations to the story. One such story can be found in the Epic of Gilgamesh. Although the Epic of Gilgamesh is similar to the Genesis version, there are some differences in the days leading to, during, and after the flood....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh Essays] 805 words
(2.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Comparing Epic of Gilgamesh and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible Essay - Parallels Between the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Bible The most well-known parallel between the Epic of Gilgamesh and the Bible is the story of the Flood, in Genesis 6-7. This is essentially equivalent to the story that Utnapishtim, the Sumerian Noah, tells to Gilgamesh on Tablet XI. Even the way the narrative is laid out is similar - the gods put a bug in Utnapishtim's ear; a description of how the ark is built ("daubed with bitumen," a common glue or mortaring agent in Mesopotamia); everyone piles in, and it starts to rain....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays] 756 words
(2.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Flood in Epic of Gilgamish and Book of Genesis of the Holy Bible Essay - The Flood in The Epic of Gilgamish and The Bible The story of the great flood is probably the most popular story that has survived for thousands of years and is still being retold today.  It is most commonly related within the context of Judeo-Christian tradition.  In the Holy Bible, the book of Genesis uses the flood as a symbol of God's wrath as well as His hope that the human race can maintain peace and achieve everlasting salvation.  The tale of Noah's Ark begins with God's expression of dismay as to the degenerate state of the human race at the time.  People were behaving wickedly and sinfully and God decided that a genetic cleansing was necessary.  He spared only Noah and his famil...   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh Essays] 883 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Comparing the Great Flood in Epic of Gilgamesh and the Biblical story of Noah’s Ark - Comparing the Great Flood in Epic of Gilgamesh and the Biblical story of Noah’s Ark Many of the same ancient stories can be found in different cultures. Each story differs in a small way, but the general idea remains synonymous. One story that is paralleled in several cultures is the legend of a great flood. The epic of Gilgamesh resembles the Bible’s story of Noah’s Ark, but specific details differ in several aspects.      The story of Gilgamesh originates from twelve fire-hardened, mud tablets, written in cuneiform, in the Mesopotamian culture from around 2500 B.C.E....   [tags: Epic of Gilgamesh Holy Bible]
:: 3 Works Cited
1165 words
(3.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay about Flood Myth of the Holy Bible and the Epic of Gilgamesh Flood Myth - The Biblical Flood and The Epic of Gilgamesh Flood      In Genesis of the Old Testament the account of the Flood approximates the account recorded on Tablet 11of the Sumero-Babylonian version of the epic of Gilgamesh, discovered in the 1800’s by British archaeologists in Assyria.   N.K. Sandars in the Introduction to his book, The Epic of Gilgamesh, sums up the involvement by the pagan gods in the Sumero-Babylonian Flood narrative:   In the Gilgamesh flood Ishtar and Enlil are as usual the advocates of destruction....   [tags: Epic Gilgamesh essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1642 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]

Related Searches




Seven being what they considered as "perfect" and is often used in the Bible stories.

         *The Gilgamesh boat was divided into seven decks, while the Noah Ark was only three decks. Three is a "Biblical number" yet here again we already have seven in the story. Why change it?

         *The man in the Babylonian story  loads his boat first off with "all things silver.....(and)....all things gold", indicating that his mind was still on Earthly possessions and desires. Even though all Mankind was going to be killed, he still loaded up on money and material possessions. Noah is not mentioned as loading anything which he did not need to survive the trip and feed the animals.

         *The man in the Babylonian story loads all the craftsmen who built the ship as well as his family and all living things. Noah loads only his family and a sampling of all living things.

         *When people ask the man in the Gilgamesh story what he is doing building a boat, he is told to trick the people and tell them that he is going away. While he is gone, the people will be showered with abundance. In effect lying to them and told by the god to do so.  In the Biblical account, Noah tells the people the truth and outright says that a flood is coming but they do not believe him.

         *A Babylonian god sets the land ablaze in the Gilgamesh story, while with Noah, there is no mention of the land being covered with fire.

         *The Babylonian gods are afraid of the flood and run in terror from the waters. They are described as crying like women and having their lips drawn back in fear. In Noah's flood, God is in full control and shows no fear or terror at all.

         *The Gilgamesh flood lasted only seven days. The Biblical flood lasted for over a year and a half....260 days. Again...here we have a perfectly "Biblical number", seven, yet the teller of the Noah flood would have changed it to 260 days. (150+40+7+7+56) Even broken down into the time incriments used in the Bible, the numbers are not the ones traditionally used in Bible stories....only the 7's and 40. Why change it?

        *The birds used did different things. In the Gilgamesh story, the dove was the first released but returned. Then the swallow which also returned. Finally, the raven stayed out, signalling the appearance of land and the time to leave the boat. In the Bible, the raven was sent out first but did not return, presumably landing and feeding off the dead animal carcasses floating on the surface. Noah noticed this so he released a non-carrion eating bird, a dove, but it came back. The second time the dove came back with a twig of new growth in its mouth. Finally, on the third time, it stayed out. Once again we have to ask.....why change the birds from three to two? And the two birds that do carry over (the dove and raven), act different in the two stories and in different order. Why?

       *The Babylonian gods are described as "crowding like flies" around the sacrifice offered by the man. They then are seen wimpering and fighting amongst themselves, blaming each other for the flood. One of the gods is seen to get angry that a human was saved from the flood and that not ALL of mankind was killed. In the Bible, God is repentant but more of a sorrow that his anger got the best of him once he looked over all the destruction. He is in full control of his senses and is not wimpering and acting half out of his wits with what to do....unlike the Babylonian story. God then makes a vow with Noah and all Mankind that he never will destroy the Earth, no matter how bad we humans mess up and He blesses Noah and his family.  Noah then goes out with his family and the animals and repopulates the Earth.

       *The man in the Gilgamesh story is then taken aside and made into an immortal while in the Biblical story, Noah and his family simply repopulates the Earth.

 

 


Return to 123HelpMe.com