Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists


Length: 348 words (1 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Excellent
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Text Preview

More ↓

Continue reading...

Open Document


Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists
From 1787-1790 the development of the American Constitution was a battle between two opposing political philosophies. America’s best political minds gathered in Philadelphia and other cities in the Northeast in order to find common ground in a governmental structure. The Federalists and the Anti-Federalists had both some political thoughts that agreed as well as some political thoughts that disagreed. However, both parties would compromise and ultimately come together.
The Federalist Party, led by James Madison, was in favor of the newly formed Constitution. One of the main objects of the federal constitution is to secure the union and in addition include any other states that would arise as a part of the union. The federal constitution would also set its aim on improving the infrastructure of the union. This would include improvements on roads, accommodations for travelers, and interior navigation. Another consideration for the Federalist Constitution would be in regards to the safety of each individual state. They believed that each state should find an inducement to make some sacrifices for the sake of the general protection.
The Anti-Federalist Party, led by Patrick Henry, objected to the constitution. They objected to it for a few basic reasons. Mostly the Anti-Federalists thought that the Constitution created too strong a central government. They felt that the Constitution did not create a Federal government, but a single national government. They were afraid that the power of the states would be lost and that the people would lose their individual rights because a few individuals would take over. They proposed a “Bill of Rights”, to make sure the citizens were protected by the law. They believed that no Bill of Rights would be equal to no check on our government for the people.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists." 123HelpMe.com. 22 Aug 2017
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=65596>.
Title Length Color Rating  
Federalists and Anti-Federalists Essay - The Constitution, when first introduced, set the stage for much controversy in the United States. The two major parties in this battle were the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists. The Federalists, such as James Madison, were in favor of ratifying the Constitution. On the other hand, the Anti-Federalists, such as Patrick Henry and Richard Henry Lee, were against ratification. Each party has their own beliefs on why or why not this document should or should not be passed. These beliefs are displayed in the following articles: Patrick Henry's "Virginia Should Reject the Constitution," Richard Henry Lee's "The Constitution Will Encourage Aristocracy," James Madison's "Federalist Paper No....   [tags: History Historical Politics Political Essays Comp] 1659 words
(4.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists Essay - The Federalists vs. The Anti-Federalists When the revolutionary war was over, the American colonists had found themselves free of British domination. Due to the fact that they were free from British control, they wanted to create their own system of government where tyranny would be practically diminished. Originally, the separate states were connected by The Articles of Confederation. But this document gave the central government no power of their own. Because of this, the states had many problems in international politics since they had just found freedom and did not have the respect of other countries....   [tags: Papers] 664 words
(1.9 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay on The Federalists vs the Anti-federalists in Colonial America - ... Anti-Federalists believed that republics could only survive in homogeneous communities, with everyone holding the same values, and interests; they believed that too much diversity would destroy a republic. The Anti-Federalists could not make an effective campaign against the Federalists because of their intellectual inability, political skills, and social class. The Federalists, however, were very well educated, wealthy, and extremely well organized which was one of their key characteristics that lead them to victory....   [tags: Government, Bill, America] 615 words
(1.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on The Anti-Federalists’ Representation of People - The Anti-Federalists had many views that were different than those of the Federalists. One the differences that seems to be important, is who they view as “The people”. The Anti-Federalists believed that common people should be able to be active participants of their government; this involvement includes having a say in the laws that are made and the protection of everyday working class people. This common man involvement is reinforced by the fact that the Anti-Federalists wanted to keep government more local, by having strong state governments....   [tags: federal farmer letter, the people]
:: 2 Works Cited
1391 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists Essay - Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists From 1787-1790 the development of the American Constitution was a battle between two opposing political philosophies. America’s best political minds gathered in Philadelphia and other cities in the Northeast in order to find common ground in a governmental structure. The Federalists and the Anti-Federalists had both some political thoughts that agreed as well as some political thoughts that disagreed. However, both parties would compromise and ultimately come together....   [tags: essays research papers] 348 words
(1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Anti-Federalists Essay - The Founding Fathers were the men recognized for drafting the United States Constitution and are often viewed as an unselfish group of men who shared a singular belief about how government should work. The truth about the Philadelphia Constitutional Convention and the differing political factions is not as unified and glamorous as this storybook image of history would have us to believe. Their finished product did result in a lasting framework that defined our government‘s structure as well as establishing liberty as a cornerstone to our new society....   [tags: Definition, US Constitution] 867 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Beliefs of the Anti-Federalists - The name, Anti-Federalists is not the best-suited name for what they truly are, or what they believe in. “They are called the Anti-Federalists, but it should be made clear at once that they were not Anti-Federal at all.” (Main xi) Originally, the word federalist, meant anyone who supported the Articles of Confederation. The term “Anti-Federalist” was placed on them to portray them as people who did not agree with the Federal Government, which was exactly opposite of what they are. According to the proper definition, the Anti-Federalists were really more “Federal” than the so-called Federalists....   [tags: essays research papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
722 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Constitution of the United States Essay - Perhaps the greatest document of all time, the Constitution of the United States of America was not easily created. Fifty-five great men were needed to hammer out all the details of the Constitution in a long grueling process. As James Madison, architect of the constitution said, “The [writing of the Constitution] formed a task more difficult than can be well conceived by those who were not concerned in the execution of it. Adding to [the difficulty] the natural diversity of human opinions on all new and complicated subjects, it is impossible to consider the degree of concord which ultimately prevailed as less than a miracle.” The “natural diversity of human opinions” which Madison spoke of...   [tags: Federalists, Anti-federalists] 669 words
(1.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Arguments Of Fedrealists V. Anti-Federalists Essay examples - When the members of the Constitutional Convention, after several months of vigorous debating, finally finished their work, many of the members still objected to this document. The Federalists were the group of people who desired to get the finished new constitution ratified and the Anti-Federalists were the group of people who disliked the new constitution and believed it shouldn't be ratified because it was missing several key parts. The Anti-Federalists formulated arguments based on the weaknesses they found in the new constitution and used them against the Federalists in order to gain support, while the Federalists convinced citizens of the righteousness of the new constitution in order t...   [tags: United States History Constitution] 1104 words
(3.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Ratification of the United States Constitution Essay - During 1787 and 1788 there were quite a few debates over the ratification of the United States Constitution. The issues disputed are outlined and explored in the Federalist Papers, an assortment of letters and essays, often published under pseudonyms, which emerged in a variety of publications after the Constitution was presented to the public. Those who supported the Constitution were Federalists, and those who opposed were Anti-Federalists. Their deliberations concerned several main issues. Alexander Hamilton, John Jay, James Madison, and other supporters of the Constitution argued in support of the federalist requirements that reserved powers to the states as well as the nationalist el...   [tags: anti-federalists, federalist paper] 961 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]

Related Searches





In the end the federalists would agree to the anti-federalist’s proposal for a Bill of Rights and the Two Parties would come together as one. This Compromise between the Federalist and the Anti-Federalist party is viewed by many historians as the biggest compromise in American history. It would be one to from our present day government.


Return to 123HelpMe.com