The Louvre


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The Louvre

T h e A r t M u s e u m s of P a r i s

Paris is renowned worldwide for its art museums. There are so
many, each with its own unique pieces of art, this report will only
cover two of Paris’ most famous museums. Which are of course The
Louvre and Museum d’Orsay.

The Louvre

History

The Louvre was originally built in 1190 AD as a fortress for
protection to the city of Paris during the Crusades. It was a
fortress for nearly 500 years until it became an elegant palace. By
the 1400’s France’s Royalty gathered at The Louvre to enjoy
banquets and tournaments. Elaborate gardens were added along with
an aviary and many wild, exotic animals. In 1415 France was captured
by the British and The Louvre was ravaged by vandals. It fell into
disrepair and was left unoccupied for nearly 150 years. This is when
Francis the first tore down the original structure and erected an
exquisite and prosperous palace. Every king since then on added an
addition to The Louvre. It also served as their home until the
French Revolution of 1789. The Louvre officially became a museum in
1793. The government opened it to the public which no longer
meant art was only available to the upper-class. All through the
previous centuries the government had collected priceless pieces of
art and now displayed them in The Louvre. The collection was
growing so big that more buildings had to be built to display the
great and precious collection that was accumulated over so many
years. This period was known as “The Restoration” as Napoleon
established remodeling of the interior and exterior of the Louvre
and eliminated all the shops that filled the Louvre from the 18th
century.

The Louvre Today

Today The Louvre is one the World’s most famous Art Museums.
It houses many famous masterpieces such as:

The Mona Lisa
Winged Victory of Samothrace
Venus De Milo
The Seated Scribe

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"The Louvre." 123HelpMe.com. 16 Jan 2017
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=43843>.

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The Louvre is Divided into 7 separate departments. They are:

Oriental Antiquities-
Egyptian Antiquities-
Greek, Etruscan and Roman Antiquities
Objets d'Art
Sculpture
Paintings
Prints and Drawings


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