Anthropology - Lucy in Hadar


Length: 557 words (1.6 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Excellent
Open Document
Need writing help? Check your paper »

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Text Preview

More ↓
Anthropology - Lucy in Hadar


In a search to find our ancestors, several anthropologists have found evidence to support their conclusions. In the films about Don Johanson's discovery of Lucy in Hadar, one may be very intrigued by the first film but very disturbed by the second film.

I was very intrigued by the findings of the Australopithecines. The idea that Lucy, the skeleton found in Hadar, Africa, was closely related to the human species was amazing.
Lucy was bipedal and her brain was smaller than that of modern humans. Lucy resembled an ape and was able to make tools to find food and weapons.

Hadar, Africa was believed to be a heavily vegetated area but had evolved into a dry and desolate desert. After Lucy died, it was difficult to find her remains due to erosion and sediment in the body of water in which she died. Johanson and his team worked were able to use the advancement of technology to calculate about how old Lucy's remains were.

The second film by Johanson seemed to disturb me because it discussed how some believe that all primates are killers and it portrayed this idea in film and in television. I disagree with the idea that all primates are predators and are always hunting harmless animals and destroying things. I understand that some primates must rely on hunting as a source of survival but I believe the portrayal of primates as barbaric in the film was unnecessary. In the second film, the primates were shown destroying piles of bones and throwing large objects.

Johanson's film disturbed me in others parts. For example, when Lucy was killed by a lion and dragged into a tree. It seemed almost as if Lucy's hearing was not keen enough and therefore she was unable to escape the lion. It is a very crucial portion of the circle of life but the idea of Lucy being killed and dragged into a tree to become dinner for a hungry lion bothers me because of the direct link of Lucy to humans.

I believe that Lucy is one of the first Australopithecines closely related to the human species for several reasons. Although she had a small brain, Lucy could make tools, use a fire for heat, and use sticks to gather termites for food.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Anthropology - Lucy in Hadar." 123HelpMe.com. 12 Dec 2017
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=43139>.
Title Length Color Rating  
A Closer Look at Lucy: Sexual Dimorphism and Speciation in Australopithecus - A Closer Look at Lucy: Sexual Dimorphism and Speciation in Australopithecus In his peer-reviewed article, “Sexing fossils: a boy named Lucy?,” James Shreeve discusses, in detail, a study on sexual dimorphism and possible speciation in Australopithecines in Hadar, Ethiopia, based on the famous A. afarensis specimen, “Lucy.” In the article, “Lucy’s kind takes humanlike turn,” the author addresses sexual dimorphism and speculates on sex-based differences in behaviors in A. afarensis. The two articles have differences and commonalities with each other in content and both present research methods and conclusions on topics including sexual dimorphism, sex-based behaviors, and speciation in Aus...   [tags: Anthropology Essays Paleontology Papers]
:: 2 Works Cited
1308 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Anthropology is Quantitative Essay - There is a lot of conflict to the question “is anthropology a science?” A lot of this conflict leads from defining what a science is, in the dictionary science is, “a branch of knowledge or study dealing with a body of facts or truths systematically arranged and showing the operation of general laws.” (Dictionary.com, 2011) Anything that can be studied is considered a science. Without science anthropology would be nearly impossible to study, science makes everything quantifiable....   [tags: Anthropology ]
:: 3 Works Cited
959 words
(2.7 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Urbanization & Applied Anthropology Essay - Urbanization is the process of life for many and the desired way of life for many others. Human beings both inhabit urban and rural areas today all over the world. Many people may be disappointed with the development of an increasing number of urban areas. Many peoples once rural areas are now swallowed up directly as cities sprawl outward. The effects of urbanization both positive and negative get examined in the following paragraphs. In addition, who is most effected by urbanization and who plays a role in preventing and/or properly planning development will also be revealed....   [tags: Anthropology ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1818 words
(5.2 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay on Ardipithecus Ramidus Kadabba: The Oldest Hominid - Ardipithecus Ramidus Kadabba: The Oldest Hominid There was a chief new discovery of fossil bones and teeth belonging to the earliest human ancestors ever discovered. The fossil bones predate the oldest formerly discovered human ancestor by more than a million years. The discovery was of fossil remains of a hominid that lived in present day Ethiopia between 5.2 and 9.8 million years ago. (Hominids include all species following the split as of the chimpanzees on the “human” side of the evolutionary tree.) “Analyses of the hominid indicate that they belonged to a previously unidentified species, which anthropologist Yohannes Haile-Selassie of the Cleveland Museum of Natura...   [tags: Anthropology Essays Paleontology Papers]
:: 5 Works Cited
1182 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Anthropology: Examining the Physical and Cultural Characteristics of Humankind - Anthropology: Examining the Physical and Cultural Characteristics of Humankind This course has provided interesting field studies of cultures that are drastically different than what I would consider “everyday life.” Anthropology examines not only who we are as a people, but also, importantly, who we were as a people. The studies of past cultures is a good place to start to answer questions about societies and cultures today, and to bridge together the gap between the past and present, and maybe even predict where we are headed in the future....   [tags: Anthropology] 503 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Anthropology and Gender Essay - Though women have played an integral part in the history of the discipline of anthropology, it was not until the early 1970’s that the field of anthropology and gender, or feminist anthropology emerged. Sex and gender roles have always been a vital part of any ethnographic study, but the contributors of this theory began to address the androcentric nature of anthropology itself. The substantial gap in information concerning the study of women was perceived as a male bias, a prejudice made more apparent because what little women-centered fieldwork was done received insufficient attention from the academic community....   [tags: Feminist Anthropology ]
:: 2 Works Cited
1582 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay on Lucy Grealy's Autobiography of a Face - Lucy Grealy's Autobiography of a Face "Language supplies us with ways to express ever subtle levels of meaning, but does that imply language gives meaning, or robs us of it when we are at a loss to name things?"(Grealy 44). Throughout her childhood and young adulthood, Lucy Grealy attempts to create a self-image based on her looks, through the reactions of others, and her own hopefulness, but these fail and she learns to forget her image completely. It is at this time of forgetting her image that Grealy demonstrates that she is able to recognize a difference between an image that is reflected in a mirror and an image that one can create through language....   [tags: Lucy Grealy Autobiography of a Face]
:: 2 Works Cited
1429 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about William Wordsworth's Lucy Gray - William Wordsworth's Lucy Gray Losing a loved one is one of the hardest experiences every person must go through. The experience does not end with the loss though, but begins with it. The loss of a dear person leads those left behind into a downward spiral of emotions and memories. A poem entitled “Lucy Gray” by William Wordsworth focuses on that loss and the emotions that follow it. By reading the poem one can objectively experience both the grief that Lucy Gray’s death brings on but also her parents’ acceptance of her death....   [tags: Wordsworth Lucy Gray Poetry Death Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
948 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on The Mother-Daughter Relationship in Lucy by Jamaica Kincaid - The mother-daughter relationship is a common topic throughout many of Jamaica Kincaid's novels. It is particularly prominent in Annie John, Lucy, and Autobiography of my Mother. This essay however will explore the mother-daughter relationship in Lucy. Lucy tells the story of a young woman who escapes a West Indian island to North America to work as an au pair for Mariah and Lewis, a young couple, and their four girls. As in her other books—especially Annie John—Kincaid uses the mother-daughter relationship as a means to expose some of her underlying themes....   [tags: Kincaid Lucy Analysis] 1449 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Anthropology Today Essay - Anthropology Today In society today, the discipline of anthropology has made a tremendous shift from the practices it employed years ago. Anthropologists of today have a very different focus from their predecessors, who would focus on relating problems of distant peoples to the Western world. In more modern times, their goal has become much more local, in focusing on human problems and issues within the societies they live. This paper will identify the roles anthropologists today play, such as where they perform the bulk of their work, and what it is they do in both problem solving, as well as policy making....   [tags: Anthropology]
:: 6 Works Cited
1735 words
(5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]

Related Searches




Lucy using other tools to benefit her for food was one of the traits that the chimps in the Jane Goodall film were using. Lucy also was able to walk upright and has a pelvic structure similar to that of a human.

Stringer and McKie believe that unlike monkeys, who are still arboreal, apes were forced from trees, which is why they have evolved walking upright. In the films, it never suggested that Lucy was arboreal. For the beginning of the film, Johanson showed the audience an erect, bipedal Lucy. The idea that Lucy was bipedal refutes Stringer and McKie's theory that our ancestor evolved from trees. I have to say that I agree with the idea that humans evolved walking but I do not think that our ancestors were arboreal. I think that our ancestors were probably quadripedal and then became more erect but I do not believe that humans evolved from trees. The comparisons between the book and the film are unusual because I find myself believing the studies from the film.


Return to 123HelpMe.com