Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet


Length: 935 words (2.7 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Excellent
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Text Preview

More ↓

Continue reading...

Open Document



Romeo and Juliet - Fate

 

Some people may not believe that fate is something that truthfully exists in the world. This portion of the population doubts that there is anything that is actually meant to be or supposed to happen thinking that there is always a way around troubling predicaments, knowing that it isn't necessary to turn out just one certain way. They trust that whatever occurs in their lives comes as a result of the decisions that they make with their own free will. Others, however, believe that whatever happens during the course of their lives is inevitable and every event predestined and laid out before them like a roadmap to life; in other words, fate. William Shakespeare's play, Romeo and Juliet has fate as an exceptionally crucial force, pulling the characters into a more animated state. Because of fate, the play becomes tremendously thrilling and it is exactly what manages the two young lovers to meet each other in the first place. The moment that Romeo and Juliet meet is the exact incident that leads to their death, however unaware these "star-crossed lovers" are to that fact. Thus, fate is undoubtedly the most responsible influence for the couple's heartbreaking tragedy.

 

    It is not merely a coincidence that Romeo and Juliet meet in the first place. A serving man comes across Romeo and Benvolio in the first act, unaware that they are Montagues, and informs them about the Capulet party: "My master is the great rich Capulet, and, if you be not / of the house of Montagues, I pray come and crush a / cup of wine" (I ii, 86-88). It is by fate that Romeo and Benvolio run into the Capulet serving man and discover the party. It is not just a simple accident that the serving man tells the two cousins about the party at which Romeo is destined, yet unaware, that he will meet his love. Furthermore, before Romeo attends the Capulet party, he says, "Some consequence yet hanging in the stars / shall bitterly begin this fearful date" (I iv, 114-115). Romeo already predicts what the fates have in store as he says something bad might transpire if he dares to show up at the party, where he will meet Juliet.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet." 123HelpMe.com. 22 Nov 2017
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=16066>.
Title Length Color Rating  
Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Essay example - Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Before starting to decide to what extent fate was responsible for the deaths of Romeo and Juliet, I should first decide what is fate. According to the dictionary, fate is the 'inevitable destiny or necessity destined term of life; doom.' This basically means, that fate can be described as a pre-planned sequence of events influencing ones life. In Romeo and Juliet, it is obviously true to say that fate was a contributor to the deaths of the young couple, but could it have been the sole contributor....   [tags: Free Romeo and Juliet Essays] 1290 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Essay - Romeo and Juliet - Fate Some people may not believe that fate is something that truthfully exists in the world. This portion of the population doubts that there is anything that is actually meant to be or supposed to happen thinking that there is always a way around troubling predicaments, knowing that it isn't necessary to turn out just one certain way. They trust that whatever occurs in their lives comes as a result of the decisions that they make with their own free will. Others, however, believe that whatever happens during the course of their lives is inevitable and every event predestined and laid out before them like a roadmap to life; in other words, fate....   [tags: Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet] 935 words
(2.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Fate In William Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet Essay - Fate In William Shakespeare's Romeo And Juliet In the Shakespearean play Romeo and Juliet; besides love and revenge, fate is one of the main themes in the play. The whole play revolves around the concept of fate, and Shakespeare makes his audience quite aware of this on the prologue at the start of the play. Fate is an uncontrollable power or thought that is said to make things happen, fate is destiny. It is predestination where everything in and around your life is set out for you....   [tags: Free Romeo and Juliet Essays] 819 words
(2.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Essays - Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet The phrase “a pair of star-crossed” lovers first appears in the prologue of the story so you immediately get the impression of a love story. The Elizabethans were big fans of astrology and horoscopes and the idea of fate was a big part of the Elizabethan lifestyle. Throughout the story the characters mention fate, or how its God’s choice to make there decisions. The reader knows immediately that Romeo and Juliet are going to die after reading the prologue so the questions are asked why would two star-crossed lovers end up dying....   [tags: Free Romeo and Juliet Essays] 518 words
(1.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay on Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet - If the Titanic did not bump into the iceberg, a tragedy could have been avoided. Why did Hitler get elected. Maybe then the holocaust could have been avoided. If a plane flight was cancelled on 9/11, we might have avoided the deaths of thousands. Why did Romeo meet Juliet in the first place. Could Tybalt and Mercutio’s deaths been avoided. Last but not least, why did Juliet wake up in time to see dying Romeo. What exactly ties all events together. Fate. In the beginning of the play it is told, “A pair of star-crossed lovers take their life;” (Prologue.6) this sentence indicates that from the very beginning the fate of Romeo and Juliet is written in the stars....   [tags: William Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet] 746 words
(2.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet - In modern times, and in the Elizabethan era, fate plays an important role in people's lives. Many people believe it to be written in stone, and unchangeable. Many others believe it to be controlled by a person's own actions. In Romeo and Juliet, fate is one of the main themes, described as having power over many of the events in the play. Fate is often called upon, wondered about, and blamed for mishaps. However, where fate is blamed in the play as the ultimate cause for a mishap, there is always an underlying action, or combination of them, on the part of human beings that decides the consequences....   [tags: William Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet] 985 words
(2.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Essay about Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet - Imagine living a tragic existence, not even two entire decades long. Imagine being controlled by an invisible, yet limitless puppet string conducted by “the stars”. When fate is your enemy and time reveals each unraveling tragedy to your dismay, you understand how it feels to be the protagonist’s of Shakespeare’s most famous love story, The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet. Tradition, heredity, and ancestry symbolize the celestial psychology that is the stars. Controlling every miniscule detail of the play from human behavior to action sequences, to the ultimate climax of the tale....   [tags: William Shakespeare Romeo and Juliet] 881 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Fate or Coincidence in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Essay - Romeo and Juliet- Fate or Coincidence. William Shakespeare, an English actor and play write, was born in Stratford upon Avon on April 23, 1564. When he was 18 he married Anne Hathaway, a Stratford woman, who was 26 years old. Shakespeare and Hathaway had three children. The first was Susanna and the twins were Hamnet and Judith. Another of Shakespeare's great works of art, Hamnet, was named after Hamnet. Juliet, in Shakespeare's famous play Romeo and Juliet, was named after Judith. Shakespeare died on April 23, 1601....   [tags: Shakespeare, Romeo and Juliet] 792 words
(2.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Role of Fate in William Shakespeare's The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet - The Role of Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet 'Romeo and Juliet', the first romantic tragedy was based on a poem translated from the French 'Novella' (1595). Romeo Montague, who is in love with Rosaline, goes to a party in an attempt to take his mind off her. At this party he meets Juliet Capulet and immediately falls in love with her. Later he finds out that she is a Capulet, the rival family of the Montagues. He decides that he loves her in spite of this, and so does Juliet....   [tags: The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet] 2368 words
(6.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet Essay - Fate in William Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet The tragedy of Romeo and Juliet, written by the ever-famous William Shakespeare, is an eloquent story of passionate love between two teenage individuals of a time long ago. These individuals, Romeo and Juliet, fall helplessly in love with each other, in spite of the fact that their families, both upper class, have been enemies for generations. The two lovers therefore strive to maintain their ardent bond with each other in secret....   [tags: Papers] 833 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]

Related Searches




It is fate that they meet because Romeo says it himself. The final deaths of them both (Romeo and Juliet) is the "consequence" that he is talking about and the bitterness that starts the pathway to their ultimate tragedy is their first encounter, since they are supposed to be opposing enemies. For these reasons, Romeo and Juliet's first meeting is compulsory and sure to happen, fate being the most powerful force at work, determining their future.

 

    Though they are the offspring of two families who have held a grudge over each other since antiquity, Romeo and Juliet are doomed to be in love. When Romeo discovers who Juliet is, he says to himself, "O dear account! My life is my foe's debt" (I v, 132). Despite the fact that they were born into feuding families, Romeo can't help but love Juliet because he already loves her before he discovers her true identity as a Capulet. Thereupon, it is fated that he loves Juliet even if it is forbidden. Moreover, when Juliet finds out from the nurse that Romeo is a Montague, she says, "My love sprung from my only hate! / Too early seen unknown, and known too late! / Prodigious birth of love it is to me / That I must love a loathed enemy" (I v, 152-155). Since Juliet could not see beforehand that Romeo is an enemy, by fate, she begins to love him unconditionally. However, when she finds that her true love is also her true nemesis, it is too late for her to hate Romeo. Unfortunately, she has already been sucked in my love's overpowering gravity-like pull, which cripples her chances of defeating her true destiny of being in love with Romeo.

 

    It is also a result of fate that flaws agonize Friar Lawrence's plan which eventually leads to Romeo and Juliet's utmost and dire demise. For example, instead of knowing about what the friar has in mind, Romeo is informed by Balthasar about Juliet's "death": "Her body sleeps in Capel's monument, / And her immortal part with angels lives" (V I, 19-20). Though it seems like an honest accident that Balthasar is the one to tell Romeo about the turn of events, it is more likely that fate holds a much greater influence. By fate, Balthasar comes to Romeo and tells him what he believes to be true, but the piece of information he offers is a cause of the tragedy. Friar Lawrence's plan is also ruined because Friar John is unable to deliver the message to Romeo: "I could not send it (here it is again) / Nor get a messenger to bring it thee, / So fearful were they of infection" (V iii, 14-16). Because Friar Lawrence's message is crucial to the plan he devises, the fact that it is never sent creates a major rupture that can turn out to be quite deadly. Romeo, not knowing that Juliet isn't officially dead, makes a big mistake, because he is oblivious, that leads himself and Juliet toward their impending doom. The fate put over the friar's plan leaves Romeo a desire to die, which destines Juliet and himself to their conclusive fate: death.

 

    Taking into consideration that Romeo and Juliet are predetermined to meet, love and die together, fate is clearly the dominant force for the most part of the play.

 


Return to 123HelpMe.com