Essay Color Key

Free Essays
Unrated Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers





The Effects of Exercise on Pulse Rate/Heartbeat

Rate This Paper:

Length: 1172 words (3.3 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Red (FREE)      
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Effects of Exercise on Pulse Rate/Heartbeat

PLANNING

I plan to carry out an experiment where I will test the affects of
exercise on the pulse. To make sure that all the results are clear, I
will ensure my experiments are simple yet effective. In order to get a
general idea of the answer to the question, I am going to start by:

* Testing someone with an average body frame and body-fitness.

* Carrying out two experiments;

(i) Measure the heart beat before, during and after one minute of slow
jogging on the spot.

(ii) Measure the heart beat before, during and after one minute of
fast jogging on the spot.

This will give me an idea as to how exercise affects the pulse rate as
well as seeing if results change by different degrees of difficulty. I
will keep all factors in the experiment the same apart from the
varying types of exercise in each experiment.

There will be minimal equipment needed to carry out the experiment:

1. A stopwatch

2. A stethoscope

3. A suitable table to record results in.

Using my own scientific knowledge on the subject, I have made a couple
of predictions.

When the person starts the exercise, their pulse will not dramatically
increase (initially), because this is anaerobic exercise, which is a
type of exercise, which does not use up oxygen to fuel the exercise.
Instead, the body uses the body’s store of carbohydrate (glycogen).
The heart rate will, nevertheless, increase to fuel the body’s
increased requirement for oxygen.

However, it could be that after 45 seconds of the fast jogging, this
would turn into aerobic exercise. This means their heart will beat
faster and in turn the person will breathe more quickly and deeply to
get more oxygen into their system. The oxygen is carried away from
their lungs by their blood. The slow jogging, on the other hand, would
remain anaerobic exercise because the exercise period is short – just
one minute long.

Another prediction I make is that after the exercise has been carried
out, the heart rate will not drop dramatically at the start. Instead,
it will take time to recover as the body returns to its original
state. Fast jogging will increase the heart rate more than slow
jogging, because it is a more vigorous and energetic type of exercise.

I predict on the more vigorous jogging exercises, that the subject’s
heart rate would be higher. The heart has to pump blood around the
body quicker. There are a few reasons for this. Before exercise, the
sympathetic nervous system allows adrenaline into the bloodstream.
Furthermore, the metabolic rate increases. The increased metabolic
rate causes carbon dioxide to build up in muscle tissue. Adjustments
are made in ventilation because you need more oxygen to replace the
carbon dioxide. The heart rate increases to carry the waste away and
replace it with oxygen quicker.

I will take 6-7 readings at various points in the exercise;

(i) The resting pulse

(ii) The pulse after 30 seconds of exercise

(iii) The pulse after 60 seconds of exercise

(iv) The pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 10 seconds
after

(v) The pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 20 seconds
after

(vi) The pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 30 seconds
after

(vii) The pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 40 seconds
after

I will carry out a preliminary experiment to make sure the experiment
provides good results, works well, is safe, and also is easy enough to
carry out. This ensures that the actual experiment will work as I have
predicted. The results from the preliminary proved to be as I
expected, with the pulse rate slowly increasing with slow jogging, and
the pulse rate increasing relatively faster with fast jogging.

OBTAINING EVIDENCE

I will test only one person to keep the experiment simple, but I will
do varying types of exercise. In this way, I can see how the different
types of exercise affect the pulse rate and record the results
accordingly.

I will describe the exercise and pulse rate by giving a detailed
description of each one. I will measure pulse rate in ‘BPM’

I will repeat parts of the experiment which seem irregular to see if
the results vary hugely from the original result. If so, there must
have been an error in my original experiment, so I will take it again.
However, if on the second time round there is a relatively small
difference, I will leave the result because irregularities will occur
in most experiments.

I will present my results in a clearly laid out table where
comparisons will be easy to make. On the next page are my results.

Below are the results for the effects of exercise during slow jogging
on the spot.

Slow jogging on the spot

Pulse type:

resting pulse

pulse during the exercise –

reading at 30 seconds

pulse during the exercise – reading at 60 seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 10 seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 20 seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 30 seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 40 seconds

64

72

82

78

73

69

65

Here are the results displayed in a bar chart.

[IMAGE]

Here are the results displayed in a line graph.

[IMAGE]

Below are the results for the effects of exercise during fast jogging
on the spot.

Fast jogging on the spot

Pulse type:

resting pulse

pulse during the exercise –

reading at 30

seconds

pulse during the exercise – reading at 60

seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 10 seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 20 seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 30 seconds

pulse after the exercise is finished – reading at 40 seconds

65

75

89

84

79

72

66

Here are the results displayed in a bar chart.

[IMAGE]

Here are the results in a line graph.

[IMAGE]

ANALYSING EVIDENCE

I believe both graphs are useful in terms of comparing, but I found
the line graph to be more useful. This was mainly because you could
see where the pulse peaked and then how fast it dropped down again.
The line graph also showed every second of the experiment so you can
see what the heart rate is at 45 seconds into the experiment as well
as 30 and 60 seconds in. Whereas on the bar charts they only show you
what the BPM is for a second. I could compare both this result and the
other result.

The pattern on both the slow and fast jogging graph follows as this:
From the resting pulse, the heartbeat increases relatively quickly and
peaks at the end of the exercise (60 seconds). Then as the exercise
ceases, the pulse does not immediately drop, but slowly progresses
back down to its normal resting rate.

It would be necessary to use a line of best fit on a line graph to get
a more flowing, approximate result, apposed to erratic lines. If there
are any irregularities, I will identify them.

As identified in the planning, my knowledge proved to be correct.

‘When the subject starts the exercise, their pulse will not
dramatically increase because this is anaerobic exercise’ – This shows
in the line graphs. The subject’s heart rate increased minimally after
25 seconds of exercise: just a 10bpm increase for fast jogging and
8bpm for slow jogging.

My predictions were backed up well; I discovered that the heart rate
did increase, mostly due to the factors of:

(i) The sympathetic nervous system allows adrenaline into the
bloodstream.

(ii) The metabolic rate increases.

(iii) Carbon dioxide builds up in muscle tissue causing adjustments in
heart rate to carry the waste away and replace it with oxygen quicker.

EVALUATION

I thought my experiment worked successfully. It worked well in
conjunction with my preliminary experiment and the outcome was as I
expected. The experiment was simple to keep results clear and easy to
analyse. However, to improve my investigation I could have tested more
people and compare the different fitness levels. Overall, I was
pleased with my results and felt they were accurate.

In this experiment, there were no anomalies on results graph. This
indicates that there were no irregularities, inconsistencies, or
errors in my experiment.

I ensured the conditions for each experiment were the same. However, a
few factors were out of my control. When I did my preliminary test and
when I did it the real time round, the subjects fitness could have
changed over this period. Furthermore, I could have used a heart-rate
monitor to measure a heartbeat more accurately.

After my investigations, I have come to the conclusion exercise makes
your heart beat faster.



How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"The Effects of Exercise on Pulse Rate/Heartbeat." 123HelpMe.com. 29 Jul 2014
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=148617>.




Related Searches





Important Note: If you'd like to save a copy of the paper on your computer, you can COPY and PASTE it into your word processor. Please, follow these steps to do that in Windows:

1. Select the text of the paper with the mouse and press Ctrl+C.
2. Open your word processor and press Ctrl+V.

Company's Liability

123HelpMe.com (the "Web Site") is produced by the "Company". The contents of this Web Site, such as text, graphics, images, audio, video and all other material ("Material"), are protected by copyright under both United States and foreign laws. The Company makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the Material or about the results to be obtained from using the Material. You expressly agree that any use of the Material is entirely at your own risk. Most of the Material on the Web Site is provided and maintained by third parties. This third party Material may not be screened by the Company prior to its inclusion on the Web Site. You expressly agree that the Company is not liable or responsible for any defamatory, offensive, or illegal conduct of other subscribers or third parties.

The Materials are provided on an as-is basis without warranty express or implied. The Company and its suppliers and affiliates disclaim all warranties, including the warranty of non-infringement of proprietary or third party rights, and the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. The Company and its suppliers make no warranties as to the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the material, services, text, graphics and links.

For a complete statement of the Terms of Service, please see our website. By obtaining these materials you agree to abide by the terms herein, by our Terms of Service as posted on the website and any and all alterations, revisions and amendments thereto.



Return to 123HelpMe.com

Copyright © 2000-2013 123HelpMe.com. All rights reserved. Terms of Service