The Effect of Mass Migration on Greece and Rome


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The Effect of Mass Migration on Greece and Rome


The fall of the Roman Empire was a mixture of internal and external
factors that slowly lead to the complete decay of the cities; Rome and
Constantinople. Early explanations blame the decline on Mass
Migration. Hundreds of thousands of people left their settlements and
set out to find new homes. The fact that such a mass migration took
place while the Romans were still in power, was seen as the leading
cause for the fall. The Romans were simply overtaken by the massive
overflow of inhabitants. However true this cause may be, moderns
thinkers have found many other contributing factors that lead to
Rome’s complete demise.

With large amounts of people came disease. Plagues came from the east
swept across Europe, killing a large portion of Rome’s population. In
addition to this, Rome’s people became less unified. There was no more
trust or dignity left in Rome due to such horrible emperors such as
Caligula, Nero and Commodus, to name a few. By Rome’s end, there were
really no good rulers left. Roman leaders became corrupt and only
sought power for themselves. Almost every military commander secretly
had his eye on the throne and was ready to overthrow the emperor and
take power himself. The armies spent more time fighting each other
than battling enemies.

But despite these facts, the people of Rome became increasingly more
civilized and educated. The major drawback to this was that civilized
people were not as good on the battlefields as the former barbarians
were. But the barbarians had become obsolete; they too had become
educated and were living like the Roman’s did. Therefore, the empire’s
security suffered greatly. Rome became vulnerable to its enemies.

To this catalogue of troubles one needs also to add economic problems.
Rome was spending well outside of its means. Rome and Constantinople
were giving free food rations to the increasing number of poor and
sick people. They were also using gold to buy exotic spices, silk and
other overseas luxuries that the struggling upper class desired.

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Soon
Rome didn't even have enough gold to produce coins. The citizens began
to starve and the city fell to crime and poverty.

Eventually, it was a fatal combination of one bad decision and the
economic collapse that lead to the complete fall of the Roman Empire.
The Roman Empire’s northern boarders were the Rhine River and the
Danube River. They are wide, hard to cross streams. This meant, the
border to the north was easy to defend. But when the Huns from the
east attacked the Visigoths on the other side of the Danube, emperor
Valens of Constantinople decided to allow the Visigoths to settle on
the Roman side of the river. The Visigoths then gladly became allies
of the Romans. But soon bad living conditions, poverty and starvation
led the Visigoths to revolt. With the Empire’s weakened state and no
river in which to defend them, Rome’s outlook was bleak. It was not
long before the Visigoths conquered the entire Roman Empire.

In conclusion, Mass migration may have strongly influenced the decline
of the Roman Empire but did not single-handedly bring it to an end.
There were a great many contributing factors. The most fatal
influences in its fall were overspending, poverty and starvation.
These factors most weakened the cities and eventually drove the
Visigoths to sack the city.


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