Europeans in Pursuit of Capitalism in New England

  • Length: 527 words (1.5 double-spaced pages)
  • Rating: Excellent
Open Document

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Text Preview

More ↓

Continue reading...

Open Document

Europeans in Pursuit of Capitalism in New England


Indian and European people had many cultural differences causing both cultures to clash. The two cultures also had different beliefs in terms of land usage and commodities. The European arrival had an enormous impact on the ecosystem, which as well affected the lives of the Indians. The Indians were used to being mobile in terms of their way of living as opposed to the European colonists, they were used to settling in one place and were also very materialistic. On the other hand, the Indians only possessed what they needed and did not have luxuries like the colonists.
The Indians of New England did not believe in land ownership because they moved from one location to another, depending on seasonal changes. The Indians were not greedy over the land; they just planted crops and hunted animals for survival. Cronon points out that "Indian villages moved from habitat to habitat to find maximum abundance through minimal work, and so reduce their impact on the land, the English believed in and required permanent settlements." (p.53) Once the land in which they cultivated their crops lost its fertility they migrated to another location seeking land with fertile soil because the Indians wouldn't overwhelm the land. New England had an abundance of natural resources such as timber, animals, crops, water, and fish. Thus, they did not misuse or waste their resources; they used everything wisely. They hunted only as needed or depending on how well the hunting season went, but they never accumulated the animals. Indians traded animal furs for knives, hooks, and other metal goods with the Europeans.

European colonists' arrival had a tremendous impact on the ecology of New England. When the Europeans arrived to New England they saw the abundance of natural resources that there was and began exaggerating when reporting back to their people, they would say that there was an infinite amount of resources to encourage more people to come to New England. Europeans were amazed by the abundance that there was and began overwhelming the land and hunting in excess to their needs, and destroying the forests for agricultural use. Europeans also believed that if they stayed in a piece of land for a certain amount of time they became the owners of it and since the Indians depended much on mobility the Europeans began to take over the land.

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"Europeans in Pursuit of Capitalism in New England." 123HelpMe.com. 27 May 2018
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=133132>.
Title Length Color Rating  
Ecological Change in New England under Native Americans and Colonists Essay - Although the colonial history of New England has been thoroughly researched and taught across all levels of educational institutes across the United States, the study of its environmental history often takes a backseat to America’s complex and enthralling social and political history. This trend has been abating in recent decades, given that more Americans have taken an interest in their environment and conservation, and in response to this new demand the field of environmental history was initiated by historians like William Cronon, who explores the changes in the New England environment under the stewardship of Native Americans and European colonist in Changes in the Land: Indians, Colonis...   [tags: Ecology]
:: 1 Works Cited
1629 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
New England and Chesapeake Bay Colonies Essay - By 1700, differences in religious convictions, wealth, and climate transformed the New England and Chesapeake Bay colonies into distinct societies with markedly contrasting cultures and values. Having fled England because of religious persecution, the Puritans placed a greater emphasis on religion. In contrast, the Chesapeake society, consisting mostly of men who were affected by the primogeniture laws, placed more importance on wealth and land. The climates of the two societies fostered distinct economies and new cultural practices, such as the tobacco wives in the Chesapeake region....   [tags: chesapeake society, new england, puritans] 670 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Applying the Kotter Eight Step Change Model to New England Wire and Cable - Companies are not unlike species, they must both change with the current environment or risk becoming extinct. Charles Darwin succinctly states this idea, “It is not the strongest of the species that survive, nor the most intelligent but the one most responsive to change.”1 In the case study, “Other People’s Money,” in the scene presented there is a proxy vote going to take place by the shareholders of the New England Wire and Cable (NWC) Company. But, before the votes are casted both the Chairman of the Board and patriarch Andrew "Jorgy" Jorgenson and the potential majority shareholder Lawrence "Larry the Liquidator" Garfield are afforded the opportunity to deliver speeches to the body of...   [tags: New England Wire and Cable]
:: 1 Works Cited
1921 words
(5.5 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay about Use of Allegories in A New England Nun - Use of Allegories in A New England Nun    In "A New England Nun", Mary E. Wilkins Freeman depicts the life of the classic New England spinster. The image of a spinster is of an old maid; a woman never married waiting for a man. The woman waiting to be married is restricted in her life. She does chores and receives education to make her more desirable as a wife.          This leads to the allegories used in this short story. The protagonist life paralleled both of her pets' lives, her dog Caesar's and that of her little yellow canary....   [tags: New England Nun Essays] 1725 words
(4.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Fever in Salem: A New Interpretation of the New England Witch Trials Essay examples - The author of this book has proposed an intriguing hypothesis regarding the seventeenth-century witchcraft trials in Salem, Massachusetts. Laurie Winn Carlson argues that accusations of witchcraft were linked to an epidemic of encephalitis and that it was a specific form of this disease, encephalitis lethargica, that accounts for the symptoms suffered by the afflicted, those who accused their neighbors of bewitching them. Though this interpretation of the Salem episode is fascinating, the book itself is extremely problematic, fraught with historical errors, inconsistencies, contradictions, conjecture, and a very selective use of the evidence....   [tags: New England Witch Trials] 685 words
(2 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay about Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie - Catharine Maria Sedgwick’s A New-England Tale and Hope Leslie - Opening Doors for Women Limited opportunities for women to share their opinions publicly throughout the Nineteenth century caused an abundance of females to communicate their ideas through writing. Catharine Maria Sedgwick was among the first of American authors to publish historical and other fiction. Much of her work deals with the role of white women in society, especially involving the Cult of Domesticity or True Womanhood....   [tags: New England Tale Essays]
:: 6 Works Cited
3303 words
(9.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Pursuit of Happiness - Four Revolutionary Words, by Andrew Sullivan - "It's a small phrase when you think about it: "the pursuit of happiness." It's somewhat over-shadowed in the Declaration of Independence by the weightier notions of "life" and "liberty." In today's mass culture, it even comes close to being banal. Who, after all, doesn't want to pursue happiness. But in its own day, the statement was perhaps the most radical political statement ever delivered. And when we try and fathom why it is that the United States still elicits such extreme hatred in some parts of the world, this phrase is as good a place to start as any." "What power four little words still have....   [tags: The Pursuit of Happiness] 846 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale - Jane Elton's Identity Conflict in Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale In her article “‘But is it any good?’: Evaluating Nineteenth-Century American Women’s Fiction,” Susan Harris provides methods and criteria for examining Women’s Fiction in what she calls “process analysis” (45). To apply Harris’ guidelines to Catherine Maria Sedgwick’s A New England Tale, I must first “acknowledge the ideological basis of [my] endeavor” (45) as a feminist/equalitist critique of the text. Furthermore, I identify the three-fold approach that Harris describes as historical, in distinguishing early nineteenth-century from mid- to late-century attitudes, rhetorical, in labeling Sedgwick’s communicat...   [tags: New England Tale Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
2005 words
(5.7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Essay about Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun - Life Alone in Mary E. Wilkins Freeman's A New England Nun It is hard to imagine a life in American society without first picturing marriage in a church, white picket fences, and babies. Life alone for those who turn from marriage and children can be seen as a promise of loneliness. Yet choosing not to get married or to have children does not mean unhappiness. In the words of Anne Morrow Lindbergh: “There is a quality to being alone that is incredibly precious. Life rushes back into the void, richer, more vivid, fuller than before” (qtd....   [tags: Mary wilkins freeman New England Nun Essays] 1478 words
(4.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry James' The Europeans Essays - In his novel The Europeans, Henry James tells the story of an American family that is visited by their European cousins. James uses these circumstances to depict the differences between Europeans and Americans. The Americans tend to be frightened of the Europeans, since they seem quite foreign within the puritanical American community. On the other hand, the Europeans are surprised by the Americans' provincial ways. Reaction to the unfamiliar is a central element of the novel. Each character's reaction to the unfamiliar reveals his or her personality and also determines whom that character is capable of tolerating and of loving....   [tags: Henry James Europeans Culture Essays] 1495 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]



The colonists created fences as borders between landscapes modernizing the land with industrialism. Cronon also implies that, "There are problems with animals eating crops which is solved partly by fences." They also used fences to prevent animals from trespassing to another owner's land.
Cronon's implications are that "by integrating New England ecosystems an ultimately global capitalist economy, colonists and Indians together began a dynamic change which had in no way ended by the 1800s. We live their legacy today." (p. 170) By this Cronon implies that the people (no matter what group) have changed and modernized the land in which we live in. Also, no matter in what era we are in, there will always be changes, but these changes of industrialism have brought us many consequences such as: diseases, air pollution, water pollution, ozone layer depletion, global warming, and over-developed populations in certain areas. These consequences have been of result from the numerous alterations done to the land.

It is for a fact that the European people got what they wanted, a capitalistic and industrialized economy. But the accomplishments of having capitalism have caused much chaos and destruction to this land. There has been so much over usage and abuse to the resources we have that they are now scarce and will soon be very limited. We must be careful and wise of how we use our resources because of the alterations that we have made to the land throughout the years have caused severe damage to its ecosystem. Thus, we must do something about these things or we will be nothing left of the land in 100 years; nothing lasts forever!




Bibliography:

Changes in the land, William Cronon



Return to 123HelpMe.com