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The Flaws of Brutus in Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

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The Flaws of Brutus in Julius Caesar by Shakespeare

Brutus’ tragic flaws are part of what makes him a tragic hero. In Julius Caesar, Brutus is a great example of a tragic hero. His tragic flaws are honor, poor judgement, and idealism (Bedell). In Shakespeare’s plays, the tragic hero and his flaws cause the downfall of the play (Tragic Flaws).
In the play Julius Caesar, Cassius and the other conspirators take advantage of Brutus’ honor. The conspirators wrote Brutus fake letters from the public to get him to join them. Once he joined the conspirators, they used him to bring good to killing Caesar. This idea worked until Antony showed up. That’s when Brutus’ second flaw kicked in (Plutarch).
The second flaw is Brutus’ poor judgement. His judgement is taken advantage of by Antony. The first sign of this is when Antony talks Brutus into letting him speak at Caesar’s funeral. Another example of Brutus’ poor judgement is how Brutus thinks that Antony could cause no harm to the conspirators and their plan. The judgement Brutus made when he let Antony speak at the funeral was the turning point of the play and it led to the conspirators downfall. Brutus’ final act of poor judgement was when he decided to attack Antony and Octavius at Philippi. This decision lead to many deaths’s including his.
Brutus’ final flaw is his idealism. His idealism leads him to believe everything that everybody tells him. His idealism causes him to believe in Antony and Cassius. Cassius uses Brutus’ idealism by getting him to believe that they are killing Caesar for the betterment of Rome. Antony uses the idealism to get to talk to the com Brutus’ tragic flaws are part of what makes him a tragic hero. In Julius Caesar, Brutus is a great example of a tragic hero. His tragic flaws are honor, poor judgement, and idealism (Bedell). In Shakespeare’s plays, the tragic hero and his flaws cause the downfall of the play (Tragic Flaws).

In conclusion, everybody took advantage of Brutus’ flaws except Caesar. The conspirators took advantage of his honor (Plutarch), Antony took advantage of his poor judgement, and everybody took advantage of his idealism. Finally at the end of the play one of Brutus’ flaws came out in a good way. It was his honor. He killed himself instead of being captured and this shows that through all of his flaws he is still a true hero.
mon people and deceive Brutus (Bedell).
In conclusion, everybody took advantage of Brutus’ flaws except Caesar. The conspirators took advantage of his honor (Plutarch), Antony took advantage of his poor judgement, and everybody took advantage of his idealism. Finally at the end of the play one of Brutus’ flaws came out in a good way. It was his honor. He killed himself instead of being captured and this shows that through all of his flaws he is still a true hero.

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