Essay Color Key

Free Essays
Unrated Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers





The Effect of Temperature on the Protease Enzyme Trypsin

Rate This Paper:

Length: 987 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Red (FREE)      
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

The Effect of Temperature on the Protease Enzyme Trypsin

Trypsin is an enzyme, enzymes exist in all living things. They are
composed of polymers of amino acids and are produced in living cells.
Each cell contains several hundred enzymes. Their job is to catalyse
chemical reactions. In the digestive process, Trypsin breaks down
protein molecules into amino acids. Enzymes are known as "biological
catalysts" as they increase the rate at which reactions occur within
living organisms, it is not possible for enzymes to die or become used
up, however, they can be denatured which stops them from functioning
correctly. They can be denatured or affected by temperature, pH and
concentration of the enzyme, this is why homeostasis, the keeping of
certain bodily functions including pH and temperature constant is so
important. Temperature and pH can slow the rate of reaction down (at a
high or low temperature or pH), stop it completely (at a very high or
low temperature or pH) or speed it up (at an optimum temperature or
pH). For concentration of the enzyme, the lower the concentration, the
longer the time taken to react.

The factor that I am going to investigate is temperature, this is
because it is simpler to conduct the experiment than pH or
concentration.

PREDICTION

I predict that as the temperature increases, the speed of the reaction
will increase (up to a certain point), my reason for this prediction
is based on the collision theory, which states that the molecules will
gain more energy when heated and move about faster therefore
increasing the likelihood of a collision which in turn leads to a
reaction. At the temperatures 25°C and 65°C I believe the rate of
reaction will decrease due to the enzymes starting to become denatured
(the lock and key theory), then at 15°C and 75°C no reaction will
occur due to total denaturisation of all the Trypsin enzymes. Based on
both theories I predict that the optimum temperature will be 45°C.

APPARATUS

I will make sure that I have all the equipment that I will need to
conduct the experiment safely and fairly, these are goggles, a tripod,
a gauze, a heat mat, a Bunsen burner, a heat proof beaker, 14 test
tubes (minimum size 10 ml), matches, a thermometer, a stopwatch,
tongs, ice cubes, a beaker of marvel milk, a beaker of Trypsin, a pen
and paper, 2 syringes (minimum size 5ml), and finally a source of cool
water.

PLAN

When about to conduct the experiment, my first step will be to make
sure that the area around me and anywhere I may need to go is safe, by
checking that bags and stools are out of the way, and the desk where
the experiment is to be conducted is clear. My first step will be to
make a control to compare my real results with, this will be
hydrochloric acid. Then I will add water to a heat proof beaker, use
the thermometer to read the temperature, and add ice or heat with a
Bunsen burner to get the temperature to 15°C, when it reaches the
temperature I will start the stopwatch, and keep the temperature
constant for 2 minutes. After 2 minutes of keeping the beaker at a
constant temperature, I will use a syringe to acquire 5ml of Trypsin,
then a different syringe to acquire 5ml of milk, then put the
substances into separate test tubes, as it is important they do not
react at a different temperature, the next step is to put the test
tubes into the beaker, which will be acting as a water bath, whilst
keeping the beaker at the correct temperature (in this case 15°C). I
will then keep the temperature constant with the 2 test tubes in the
beaker for 2 minutes, after that time I will mix the Trypsin with the
milk, start the stopwatch and record the time when the substance
becomes as clear as the control. If the reaction appears to be not
happening, or very slow, I will wait for 5 minutes, after that if it
has not happened it will be classed as no reaction. I will do the
experiment for 6 other temperatures; 25°C, 35°C, 45°C, 55°C, 65°C and
75°C. I will repeat the whole experiment 3 times, as it appears to be
quite easy to get highly varying results.

RESULTS

FIRST EXPERIMENT

75°C

45.0s

65°C

19.8s

55°C

16.0s

45°C

20.1s

35°C

46.1s

25°C

60.83s

15°C

118.6s

SECOND EXPERIMENT

75°C

31.21s

65°C

17.0s

55°C

14.0s

45°C

20.07s

35°C

38.66s

25°C

99.25s

15°C

102.92s

THIRD EXPERIMENT

75°C

33.05

65°C

18.8s

55°C

13.04s

45°C

26.2s

35°C

42.06s

25°C

66.31s

15°C

96.89s

AVERAGES OF ALL 3 EXPERIMENTS

75°C

29.74s

65°C

18.2s

55°C

14.33s

45°C

66.3s

35°C

42.27s

25°C

75.46s

15°C

106.14s

ANALYSIS OF RESULTS

From these results, one can see that there is a trend, longer times at
the lower temperatures, 15°C took the longest time with 106.14 seconds
on average, the quickest times at 55°C, with an average of just 14.33
seconds, and at the higher end of the temperatures, medium times, 75°C
getting 29.74 seconds. Lower temperatures taking a long time is no
surprise, my prediction matches this in saying that due to the lock
and key theory in which it states that enzymes will be deformed under
certain conditions, in this case temperature, thus stopping them from
"fitting" with the molecule, there will be few Trypsin enzymes left,
therefore taking a longer time. The quickest times are at 55°C, which
is a slight surprise as the human body is not usually that hot,
therefore I would have expected that the optimum temperature would be
closer to 45°C. Yet, by far the biggest anomaly, is that the Trypsin
enzymes are still getting quick reaction times at 75°C, this is
exceptionally unusual, I predicted that the reaction times would
either be very slow or over the 5 minute time limit, therefore
counting as no reaction. The reason for this may be a faulty batch of
Trypsin, as other schools in the area also report getting incredibly
quick times at the higher temperatures. Less likely is that it is a
human mistake by the person conducting the experiment, me, I think
this is less likely as after doing the test 3 times, the results were
all roughly the same, and it is almost impossible that I started the
stopwatch minutes late and stopped it very early. Apart from that
extraordinary anomaly my prediction matches my results.

EVALUATION

I think that this experiment was conducted in a methodical, scientific
and precise manner, the anomaly is incredible and extremely unlikely
to have been caused by poor experimenting. This is a difficult
experiment to conduct as it is very hard to start the stopwatch, pour
the mixture, compare to the control, and keep the temperature constant
all at the same time. It is also questionable how one would decide
that the mixture is exactly the same as the control, all of these
factors together could lead to widely varying results. To make this
experiment more reliable, and therefore get better results, more than
one person should do it, so as one is pouring the mixture, one could
start the stopwatch, and even one more person to keep the temperature
constant would be acceptable, with regards to the mixture being
exactly the same as the control, possibly a computer would be able to
do such a task. My plan was fully successful, I did not change any of
it.

How to Cite this Page

MLA Citation:
"The Effect of Temperature on the Protease Enzyme Trypsin." 123HelpMe.com. 17 Apr 2014
    <http://www.123HelpMe.com/view.asp?id=122018>.




Related Searches





Important Note: If you'd like to save a copy of the paper on your computer, you can COPY and PASTE it into your word processor. Please, follow these steps to do that in Windows:

1. Select the text of the paper with the mouse and press Ctrl+C.
2. Open your word processor and press Ctrl+V.

Company's Liability

123HelpMe.com (the "Web Site") is produced by the "Company". The contents of this Web Site, such as text, graphics, images, audio, video and all other material ("Material"), are protected by copyright under both United States and foreign laws. The Company makes no representations about the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the Material or about the results to be obtained from using the Material. You expressly agree that any use of the Material is entirely at your own risk. Most of the Material on the Web Site is provided and maintained by third parties. This third party Material may not be screened by the Company prior to its inclusion on the Web Site. You expressly agree that the Company is not liable or responsible for any defamatory, offensive, or illegal conduct of other subscribers or third parties.

The Materials are provided on an as-is basis without warranty express or implied. The Company and its suppliers and affiliates disclaim all warranties, including the warranty of non-infringement of proprietary or third party rights, and the warranty of fitness for a particular purpose. The Company and its suppliers make no warranties as to the accuracy, reliability, completeness, or timeliness of the material, services, text, graphics and links.

For a complete statement of the Terms of Service, please see our website. By obtaining these materials you agree to abide by the terms herein, by our Terms of Service as posted on the website and any and all alterations, revisions and amendments thereto.



Return to 123HelpMe.com

Copyright © 2000-2013 123HelpMe.com. All rights reserved. Terms of Service