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Essay on Victors Frankenstein Quest for Knowledge

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What would you expect to happen to you and others around if you created a living creature out of human flesh? It is just like Frankenstein—a Romantic Era man— which Mary Shelly portrays in her novel “Frankenstein.” Victor Frankenstein, a natural philosophy student, discovers how to form life from the corpse of the dead. His Quest for Knowledge influences him to perform an experiment, which in return gives life to an abnormal formation. The monstrous creature results in isolation and punishment in Victor’s life. The gothic novel Frankenstein is a grotesque and mysterious classic monster story. Frankenstein is worth reading because it shows how playing around with God can have consequences.
Victors Quest for Knowledge became his object of pursuit after researching early medical research. Medical research teams had begun experiments with injecting electricity into dead frogs, resulting in the jolting of the frog. The Scientific fields of biology and chemistry turn in Victors mind as he comes up with a plan to bring about life from the power of electricity and the carcass of the dead. Victor says, “From this day natural philosophy, and particularly chemistry, in the most comprehensive sense of the term, became nearly my sole occupation.” Victors dream is increasing each and every moment. He wants to learn more as the day’s progress. Victor is “engaged, heart and soul, in the pursuit of some discoveries which I hope to make.” The creation of this abnormal formation is his life. He keeps a journal to hide all of the secrets he has. Victor writes in his journal saying, “I, who continually sought the attainment of one object of pursuit and was solely wrapped up in this, improved so rapidly that at the end of two years I made some dis...


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...“fiend” is taking revenge. He is being punished for his Quest for Knowledge. Victor writes in his journal stating, “The death of William, the execution of Justine, the murder of Clerval, and lastly of my wife.” The creature has opened Victor’s eyes to see the punishment that he must endeavor for his creation and the life that was provided. Victor Frankenstein tells Robert Walton, “But I-I have lost everything and cannot begin life anew.” Everything has been destroyed that Victor ever cared about. He will never be happy again. His punishments have taken over his life of dreams.
As Victor’s pursuits increased his Quest for Knowledge he had a price to pay. Isolation crept up on Victor. He didn’t have a clue in the world that he would be punished for creating an abnormal formation. His punishments and isolation will always be a part of his life, just like the creature.



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