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Urban Inequality Essay

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Introduction:
In Urban Studies two schools of academic thought answer the “urban question”: the ecological and urban political economy schools. I will argue that the political economy perspective better allows us to fully grasp the “urban question” where society and space mutually encompass each other and allow us to better explain and address urban inequality. First, I will develop a working definition of “the urban question”. Second, I will write on the ecological school’s view of the “urban” question and how their vista explains but inadequately addresses urban inequalities. Third, I will review the political economy (social-spatial dialect) landscape of the “urban question” and how their panorama explains and gives better analyses of urban inequality.
Definition: The Urban Question
Again, this section will give a working definition of the “urban question’. To fully compare the political economy and ecological perspectives a description of the “urban question” allows the reader to better understand the divergent schools of thought. For Social Science scholars, from a variety of disciplines, the “urban question” asks how space and the urban or city are related (The City Reader, 2009). The perspective that guides the ecological and the social spatial-dialect schools of thought asks the “urban question” in separate distinct terminology. Respected scholars from the ecological mode of thinking, like Burgess, Wirth and others view society and space from the rationale that geographical scope determines society (The City Reader, 2009). The “urban question” that results from the ecological paradigm sees the relationship between the city (space) as influencing the behaviors of individuals or society in the city. On the other hand...


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...r (pp. 150-157). New York, NY: Routledge.
Gottdiener, M., & Feagin, J.R. (1988). The paradigm Shift in Urban sociology. Urban Affairs Quarterly, 24(2), 163-167.
Harvey, D. (1989). The Urban Process under Capitalism: A Framework for Analysis. In R.T. Legates, & F. Stout (Eds.). The City Reader (pp. 116-124). New York, NY: Routledge.
In R.T. Legates, & F. Stout (Eds.). (2009).The City Reader. (4th Ed.) New York, NY. Routledge.
Sassen, S. (1998). Globalization and its Discontents. In G. Bridge, & S. Watson (Ed.). The Blackwell City Reader (pp. 161-170). Oxford, U: Blackwell Publishing.
Wilson, W.J. (1996). From Instituional to Jobless Ghettos. In R.T. Legates, & F. Stout (Eds.). The City Reader (pp. 110-119). New York, NY: Routledge.
Wirth, L. (1938). Urban as a Way of Life. In R.T. Legates, & F. Stout (Eds.). The City Reader (pp. 90-97). New York, NY: Routledge


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