Preview
Preview

Transcendentalism in Henry David Thoreau and Emily Dickinson's Literature

:: 8 Works Cited
Length: 992 words (2.8 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Yellow      
Open Document




- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

“If a person wished to know what transcendentalism was he should empty his mind of everything coming from tradition and the rest would be transcendentalism” (Boller 34). This literary period has dramatically shaped literature and religion, in America. Many writers like Henry David Thoreau and Emily Dickinson have been influence by transcendental ideas. It is astonishing how an inspiring literature movement can change so much of the world’s view and still is around today.
Transcendentalism was an American literature movement urging people to look past everyday material life, and reach into their souls to find inner peace with themselves. Transcendentalism originally came from Kantian idealism. This idealism was credited by Immanuel Kant. Kant was a German philosopher, born in Konigsberg, in 1724 (Scruton 1). “Kant was regarded by his immediate successors as having irreversibly changed the course of philosophy” (Scruton 92). He made an argument referred to as the Transcendental Deduction. Out of the argument a theory was formed called Transcendental Idealism (Scruton 23). American Transcendentalists were all aware, in some form, of Kantian idealism. Kant wrote two treatises, Critique of Pure Reason (1781) and Critique of Practical Reason (1788); both discussed his ideas behind his theory (Boller 37). Most transcendentalist learned about Kant’s theory, by a romantic poet named Samuel Taylor Coleridge (Boller 44).
The American Transcendental movement of new ideas began, as a rebellion within the Unitarian Church, in the Boston area, in the nine-tenth century around 1830 and continued all the way up to the civil war (Boller 1). One man that is considered to be a notable leader in the Transcendental Movement is Ralph Waldo Emerson. H...


... middle of paper ...


...w York:
Putnam, 1974. Print.
Emerson, Ralph Waldo. The Complete Essays and Other Writings: Of Ralph Waldo Emerson. New York: The Modern Library, 1940. Print.
Scruton, Roger. Kant. Oxford; New York: Oxford University Press, 1982. Print.
McElrath, Joseph R., G. K. Carey, and James Lamar Roberts. Walden: Notes. Lincoln, Neb:
Cliff's Notes, 1971. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost). Web. 4 Feb. 2014
Rusk, Ralph L. 1888-. The Life of Ralph Waldo Emerson. New York: Columbia University
Press, 1957. Print.
Smith, Harmon L. My Friend, My Friend: The Story Of Thoreau's Relationship With Emerson.
Amherst: University of Massachusetts Press, 1999. eBook Collection (EBSCOhost).
Web. 4 Feb.2014.
"Transcendental Legacy--Emily Dickinson." Transcendental Legacy--Emily Dickinson. NA, NA.Web. 11 Feb. 2014. roots/legacy/dickinson/index.html>.
.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper

Need Writing Help?

Get feedback on grammar, clarity, concision and logic instantly.

Check your paper »







This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Comparing and Contrasting Dickinson’s Poems, Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz- When I Died - Comparing and Contrasting Dickinson’s Poems, Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz - When I Died Emily Elizabeth Dickinson was born on 10th December, 1830, in the town of Amherst, Massachusetts. As a young child, she showed a bright intelligence, and was able to create many recognizable writings. Many close friends and relatives in Emily’s life were taken away from her by death. Living a life of simplicity and aloofness, she wrote poetry of great power: questioning the nature of immortality and death....   [tags: compare, contrast, Emily Dickinson] 846 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Transcendentalism in Emerson, Thoreau, and Dickinson's Literature Essay - We as humans are all born with a gift, the gift of being able to think and being able to have thoughts transitioning through our minds. From the thoughts of compassion to the thoughts of heinous, we as humans all have our own interpretation of life. Transcendentalism is the idea that our souls have with nature and that our ideas go beyond the aspect of the world as we see it. During the 1800’s, Transcendentalism blossoms with the help of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Emily Dickinson, they all express their beliefs through their writings which consists of self reliance, love of nature, and “Carpe Diem”....   [tags: Dead Poets’ Society]
:: 2 Works Cited
878 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Early American Literature Essay - As the new world struggled to gain impendence from its mother country, Britain, native authors also try to develop their own style of writings. It quickly became evident that the search for a native literature became a national obsession. Then with the triumph of American independence, many at the time saw this as a divine sign that America and her people were destined for greatness. Greatness came with a strong nation and thousands of poems and stories that still shape our nation. The recent revolution greatly expressed the heart of the American people....   [tags: Literature] 1504 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Emily Dickinson's Faith and Daisy Miller by Henry James Essay - American writers and poets of the 19th century created literature to criticize and detail the imperfections of society. Emily Dickinson, who retired from contact with the outside world by the age of twenty-three in favor of a life of isolation, can arguably be considered such a poet. Her untitled poem "Faith" can be interpreted as criticism of the masculine-dominated society of her time and supports themes in Henry James's work Daisy Miller: A Study, which also criticizes societal expectations and practices....   [tags: Henry James, Emily Dickinson] 1153 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Civil Disobedience, Henry David Thoreau Essay - "That government is best which governs least." Or is it. Should the American people be free to rebel against laws they consider unjust. Henry David Thoreau addresses these issues in his essay, Civil Disobedience. Thoreau wholeheartedly accepts the declaration that the government is best which governs least, and would like to see it acted upon. One day, he hopes, we will be able to carry it out to the point where men can have a government that does not govern at all. Government "never of itself furthered any enterprise"....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, Constitution] 1158 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau and the Patriot Act Essay - Henry David Thoreau questioned how an unjust law should be handled, should it just be followed, should action be taken to fix the law while still obeying it, or should it just be transgressed completely. The idea that one of these answers is correct is a fallacy, and a bad assumption. The answer depends on the situation at hand. Any law that tramples on the rites of a person or a group of people is a law that should be ignored and protested and actively broken. On the other hand a law that just lacks sense; is one that we could just live with or push to have fixed....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau, laws, Patriot Act, ] 520 words
(1.5 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau Was a Fool Essay - Lincoln has been credited as being a person that fought for equality between races, when he himself believed that African Americans were inferior, the image people give him is unreal, propaganda by the Radical Republicans in the reconstruction era. Many people have ideas that do not hold up when put to the test, or even their own reasoning. Henry David Thoreau’s ideas and ideals do not hold up when compared to reality. Thoreau believed that if a man did less work, the better it would be for the man and his community....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau Essays] 592 words
(1.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Henry David Thoreau's Integrity Essay - Henry David Thoreau's Integrity Although his actions were admirable and act as evidence to integrity, the writings of Henry David Thoreau and Emerson reveal a haughty and pretentious individual. Thoreau's courage was noble. He was quick to immerse himself in his beliefs and abandon any obligation to social norms despite the risk in damaging his reputation. His rejection of societal limitations and steadfast individualism was truly commendable, however, his mannerisms were extremely rude. He cast aside all tact and consideration of others because he was so consumed with himself....   [tags: Henry David Thoreau Essays] 596 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Simplicity and Freedom in Walden by Henry David Thoreau Essay - In chapter two of Henry David Thoreau's Walden, entitled "Where I Lived, and What I Lived for", there are two themes that run throughout the narrative. The key theme that emerges continually is that of simplicity with the additional theme being that of freedom. Thoreau finds himself surrounded by a world that has no true freedom or simplified ways, with people committed to the world that surrounds them rather than being committed to their own true self within nature. Simplicity is defined in the Merriam-Webster online dictionary as a simple state or quality; freedom from complexity; absence of elegance and luxury; uncomplicated....   [tags: Walden, Henry David Thoreau] 962 words
(2.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
David Henry Hwang's M Butterfly Essay example - David Henry Hwang's M Butterfly "I've played out the events of my life night after night, always searching for a new ending to my story, one where I will leave this cell and return forever to my Butterfly's arms." (Hwang 3.3.1-4) With these words of David Henry Hwang's play M Butterfly, we realize that we have just been staring directly into the memories of Rene Gallimard. The fact that Rene Gallimard serves as the narrator of his memories in the play M Butterfly delivers an impression of the character behind Gallimard than could ever be achieved by the viewing of the screenplay....   [tags: David Henry Hwang M Butterfly Essays] 1562 words
(4.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]