Preview
Preview

To Fear, Or Not To Fear: How Yeats and Hardy Envision God Essay

:: 3 Works Cited
Length: 2010 words (5.7 double-spaced pages)
Rating: Aqua      
Open Document
- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Within both Thomas Hardy’s “The Convergence of the Twain” and W. B. Yeats’ “The Second Coming”, the actions of God are extremely prevalent, though the timing of His intervention varies greatly. Though, both poems were published within a five year period (1914 and 1919 respectively), they convey significantly different perspectives on the actions of God, in relation to our actions as human beings. These poems were written less than a decade apart, but are separated by one significant event that changed the world: the First World War. Though, God plays a prevalent role within both works. His intervention occurs at different times. Yeats demonstrates a God that reacts to man’s actions, whereas Hardy’s God is omniscient, developing a correction to man’s perception of accomplishment before the Titanic is ever constructed. Hardy’s writing came just after the sinking of the Titanic, and he demonstrates that man had outstepped his bounds. In sinking the ‘unsinkable’ ship, according to the speaker, God is correcting the misadventure of man. Yeats’ poem was written shortly after World War I, and the speaker foresees an apocalypse due to the sin of man as a whole. Both authors portray the perceived actions of God, though the speaker within “The Convergence of the Twain” appears to be more accepting and less fearful. Throughout “The Second Coming”, the speaker demonstrates their fear of God’s inevitable reaction to World War I. Both poems share the imagery of water, though its significance varies between poems. The speaker’s acceptance of God’s will within Hardy’s poem represents a devout religiosity that is unwavering throughout this writing, and Yeats’ depiction focuses on fear of the coming future.
Within “The Second Coming,” Yeats demons...


... middle of paper ...


...den voyage of the Titanic, and World War I as a whole), the perception of God will undoubtedly vary greatly. While Yeats fears God’s future actions, Hardy demonstrates an acceptance of God’s action, citing man’s misunderstanding of their objectives as reason for Godly destruction.



Works Cited
Hardy, Thomas. “The Convergence of the Twain.” The Norton Anthology of English Literature. The Major Authors. Ninth ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012. 2400. Print.
Tassell-Matamua, Natasha A. "Near-Death Experiences And The Psychology Of Death." Omega: Journal Of Death & Dying 68.3 (2013): 259-277. Education Research Complete. Web. 24 Mar. 2014.
Yeats, William Butler. “The Second Coming.” The Norton Anthology of English Literature. The Major Authors. Ninth ed. Stephen Greenblatt. New York: W. W. Norton & Company, 2012. 2481. Print.



Click the button above to view the complete essay, speech, term paper, or research paper








This essay is 100% guaranteed.


Title Length Color Rating  
Analysis of William Butler Yeats' Poems Essay examples - Analysis of William Butler Yeats' Poems; When You Are Old, The Lake Isle of Innisfree, The Wild Swans at Coole, The Second Coming and Sailing to Byzantium In many poems, short stories, plays, television shows and novels an author usually deals with a main idea in each of their works. A main reason they do this is due to the fact that they either have a strong belief in that very idea or it somehow correlates to an important piece of their life overall. For example the author Thomas Hardy likes to deal with the idea of loss in many different ways within his poems some being positive and some being negative....   [tags: William Yeats, Poetry]
:: 3 Works Cited
1371 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing Hap by Thomas Hardy and The Second Coming by Yeats Essay - Comparing Hap by Thomas Hardy and The Second Coming by Yeats      Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) was one of the great writers of the Late Victorian era. One of his great works out of the many that he produced was his poem Hap, which he wrote in 1866, but did not publish until 1898 in his collection of poems called Wessex Poems. This poem seems to typify the sense of alienation that he and other writers were experiencing at the time, as they "saw their times as marked by accelerating social and technological change and by the burden of a worldwide empire" (Longman p....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
1417 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
An Analysis of Yeats' The Second Coming Essay - An Analysis of Yeats' The Second Coming Yeats' poem "The Second Coming," written in 1919 and published in 1921 in his collection of poems Michael Robartes and the Dancer, taps into the concept of the gyre and depicts the approach of a new world order. The gyre is one of Yeats' favorite motifs, the idea that history occurs in cycles, specifically cycles "twenty centuries" in length (Yeats, "The Second Coming" ln. 19). In this poem, Yeats predicts that the Christian era will soon give way apocalyptically to an era ruled by a godlike desert beast with the body of a lion and the head of a man (ln....   [tags: Yeats Second Coming Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
1835 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Yeats’ Sailing to Byzantium - Yeats’ Sailing to Byzantium       In "The Circus Animals' Desertion," W. B. Yeats asserted that his images "[g]rew in pure mind" (630). But the golden bird of "Sailing to Byzantium" may make us feel that "pure mind," although compelling, is not sufficient explanation. Where did that singing bird come from. Yeats's creative eclecticism, blending the morning's conversation with philosophical abstractions, makes the notion of one and only one source for any image implausible: see Frank O'Connor's comments on the genesis of "Lapis Lazuli," for example (211-22)....   [tags: Yeats Sailing Essays]
:: 5 Works Cited
777 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Essay on Poetry Analysis of The Second Coming by Yeats - Poetry Research Essay analysis THE SECOND COMING By William Butler Yeats, 1922 Mr. Yeats relates his vision, either real or imagined, concerning prophesies of the days of the Second coming. The writer uses the Holy Bible scripture text for his guide for because no one could explain this period of time without referring to the Holy Bible. He has chosen to present it in the form of a poem, somewhat like the quatrains of Nostradamus. The poem does not cover all the details of this event, but does give the beginning of the powerful messages, and a dark look at those ominous days surrounding the Second Coming of The Lord Jesus Christ....   [tags: William Butler Yeats]
:: 4 Works Cited
2979 words
(8.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Yeats + Friends Essay - ‘No poet in our day has written more about his family and friends than Yeats, and no one has been more successful in enlarging them to heroic proportions.' INTRODUCTION I will begin this essay with a brief history of the life of William Butler Yeats in order to secure an understanding of the social and historical context from which he created his works. I will then go on to explain the broad development of Yeats's poetic form, style and technique showing in particular how his works can be separated into two separate periods providing a brief account of the influences in each period on his themes, context and subtexts....   [tags: William Butler Yeats Poetry Family Focus] 1372 words
(3.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Sidhe, the Tuatha de Danaan, and the Fairies in Yeats's Early Works - The fin de siecle, or late 1800's, was an era not unlike our own: now we see many seeking "New Age" enlightenment; likewise, Yeats and many of his contemporaries looked for meaning in various areas of the supernatural. Ripe as the late 1800's were for spawning occult study, those were also times of political turmoil for the Irish, and Yeats became involved with Irish nationalism as well. His desire to express this nationalism was given voice through a Celtic literature that he hoped would inform and inspire his countrymen....   [tags: Yeats Papers]
:: 10 Works Cited
2681 words
(7.7 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Essay about William Butler Yeats' The Second Coming - William Butler Yeats' "The Second Coming" The poem “The Second Coming” was written by William Butler Yeats in 1919. Yeats was an accomplished Irish poet and was known for the socio-religious ideas he emphasized in his poetry. In “The Second Coming,” his ideas unfold in three significant metaphors. The first metaphor relates a falcon and its falconer to the destruction of society. The metaphor has two possible interpretations. One view may be that the falcon represents society and the falconer represents God and morality....   [tags: Yeats Second Coming Poem Poetry Essays] 502 words
(1.4 pages)
Good Essays [preview]
Essay on Among The School Children by William Butler Yeats - Among School Children by William Butler Yeats First Published 1927; collected in The Tower, 1928 Type of Poem Meditation The Poem William Butler Yeats' "'Among School Children' is written in eight eight-line stanzas that follow a precise rhyme scheme. Along with the straightforward title, stanza I establishes the immediate context of the action in deliberately prosaic language. The speaker is visiting a schoolroom, and "'a kind old nun,' his guide for the day or perhaps the classroom teacher, is answering his matter-of-fact questions in a rapid, matter-of-fact way....   [tags: Yeats School Children Poem Poetry] 1529 words
(4.4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Essay about Hardy's Jude the Obscure - Hardy's Jude the Obscure      In Hardy's Jude the Obscure, Hardy shows his views on religion and commitment to the Church which were said to have declined in the latter years of his life. (Ingham, xxvii) Throughout the book Hardy displays his feeling that religion is something that people use in order to satisfy themselves by giving their lives meaning. One instance in which Hardy clearly displays this is when he writes, "It had been the yearning of his heart to find something to anchor on, to cling to." (Ingham, 94) In order to bring out this point Hardy chooses to create Jude as an orphan and has him come from obscure origins....   [tags: Religion Religion Jude Hardy Essays] 1955 words
(5.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]