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The Synchronization of Hope Essay

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################################# Part 3 ######################################## Nature doesn’t intend for things to be perfect, if it was the contrary we wouldn’t be considered humans. Nathaniel Hawthorne’s The Birth-Mark portrays the story of a scientist, Aylmer, so self-absorbed, and supercilious in his own power of science that he would go so far as to remove the intentional “imperfect” birthmark that Nature has bestowed upon his wife’s face. “Cannot you remove this little, little mark… Is this beyond your power… Noblest, dearest, tenderest wife… doubt not my power” (216). Hawthorne uses the birthmark as a symbol to represent the imperfection that is within the human species, the mark also draws out the imperfection of those who have encountered it by displaying their tendencies to overlook the flawless beauty of Georgiana and focus solely on her birthmark, “Some fastidious persons… affirmed that the bloody hand… quite destroyed Georgiana’s beauty… Aylmer discovered that this was the case with himself” (214). Nature’s symbol is a paradigm of omnipotence. To simply put, Nature created the grand design of human life, and governs over our society but allows us as people to do as we please with our lives, so long as we do not alter with Nature’s creation, “…Our great creative Mother… She permits us, indeed to mar, but seldom to mend, and like a jealous patentee, on no account to make” (217). Despite Nature’s intention, being the pompous scientist that he is, Aylmer believes himself to be something more than a microcosm of Nature’s creation. In other words, because of his unparalleled ability in the subject science, like other...


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...or someone, and if that something or someone happens to be marred, even in the slightest possible way, it is completely disregarded and shoved aside.
Overlooking the importance of Nature’s intended design greatly plagued Aylmer’s judgment. Nature, which is attributed to the grand design of human life, creates things “imperfect” in order to give things characteristics different than that of a deity. Georgiana’s birthmark “that sole token of human imperfection… Was the bond by which an angelic spirit kept itself in union with a mortal frame” (224). When Aylmer eliminated that crimson mark from his wife’s face, in order to be with a woman whose beauty was beyond eminence, he got rid of the only thing that was keeping his wife of human presence, “The spectral hand that wrote mortality” (215). Aylmer killed his trying to search for diamonds in a gold mine.




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