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Needing Wolves in Yellowstone - Needing Wolves in Yellowstone WHY THERE HAVE BEEN NO WOLVES IN YELLOWSTONE: A Brief History Around 1930, the last wolf was spotted in the Yellowstone Area by a paid hunter, he got a shot off but his aim was not true. That was the last recorded sighting of a gray wolf in the Yellowstone Park land. From 1918 to 1935 government scouts recorded killing 35 mountain lions, 2,968 coyotes and 114 wolves (Phillips 1996). Those are total numbers, since a wolf hadn't been seen since 1930, the 114 wolves had been exterminated in the early 1920's....   [tags: Yellowstone National Park Wildlife Essays]
:: 15 Works Cited
1626 words
(4.6 pages)
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Reintroducing Wolves to Yellowstone and Idaho - 1914 began the official war of the wolves. This year Congress officially approves funds for the eradication of wolves, cougars, and other destructive animals. Wolves were declared destructive to agricultural and big game interests and formally hunted. Nearly a century later, in 1995, wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park and Idaho's Frank Church-River of No Return Wilderness(Phillips, 1996, p.20). The reintroduction of wolves in Yellowstone National Park did not end the debate of whether wolves should stay or go....   [tags: Wolf Reintroduction]
:: 7 Works Cited
956 words
(2.7 pages)
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Yellowstone National Park - ... During the 1850's to 1870, the miners of Yellowstone helped to publicize the region with not much more credibility than their trapper ancestors. In 1863, Walter and his party set out to scout through the Yellowstone to find gold. Even though the party was equipped with prospector tools and no survey equipment, his party made many new discoveries including Shoshone and Lewis Lake he also published the first map of the Yellowstone area. By 1870, gold fever was gone and the great Yellowstone expeditions began....   [tags: tourism, services, wyoming] 948 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Yellowstone National Park Wildfire of 1988 - For everyone involved in the Yellowstone fires, there is a particular day that stands out above the rest. For Carol Shively, interpretive ranger, it was July 31st; the day the fire hit West Thumb. “We headed into the geyser basin to clear visitors, but some were reluctant to leave—they were captivated by the mushroom- like clouds of smoke rising to the north, the helicopters dipping low to fill their water buckets in the lake, and the planes dropping red retardant drops that streaked across the sky....   [tags: Natural Resources]
:: 5 Works Cited
891 words
(2.5 pages)
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Climate Reconstruction in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem - Climate Reconstruction in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem When you think about visiting national parks like Yellowstone and Grand Teton National Parks, usually it’s about where you’re staying and learning a little bit of the history of the area. What usually isn’t thought of, however, is that vast amount of physical phenomena that occur in one of the few intact ecosystems left in the world. In this research paper, I will be conducting a brief analysis of the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (commonly referred to as the GYE)....   [tags: environmental issues]
:: 4 Works Cited
1514 words
(4.3 pages)
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Conservation Biology in Yellowstone National Park - ... This habitat is home to nearly 60 species of mammals including bison, bears, elk, deer, pronghorn, mountain lions, and wolves. These mammals and many others, along with the parks flora, create the ecosystem that is enjoyed every year by visitors from all over the world. However, due to many political pressures and misconceptions, the ecosystem has been modified due to human impacts. Starting in 1914, the U.S. Congress appropriated funds to be used for the purposes of destroying wolves on public lands in an effort to protect the current elk populations (Frank, 2008)....   [tags: gray, wolf, park, populations, decline] 2126 words
(6.1 pages)
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Reintroducing Wolves to Yellowstone National Park - ... When they brought the wolves back to the park, there was not just an effect on one species or one area but rather they affected the entire ecosystem of the area. I will discuss their effects on areas such elk, beaver colonies, scavengers, aspen trees, willow trees and cottonwood trees. Once the wolves were brought back into Yellowstone, immediately the elk population began decreasing. This was due to the elk comprising of about 92% of the wolves diet (White-et-al 2005). Researchers expected a 5-30 % decrease after the wolves were reintroduced however the actual observed was much more than that (White-et-al 2005)....   [tags: environmental breakthroughs] 711 words
(2 pages)
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Should the Wolves Stay in Yellowstone National Park? - Should the Wolves Stay in Yellowstone National Park. National Parks are the cornerstone of every country because it preserves the rich cultural and natural resources of a nation, such as Yellowstone in the United States of America. Yellowstone National Park is the World’s First National Park which brings millions of attraction each year, it is larger than Rhode Island and Delaware combine and have over a thousand species of plants and animal (Yellowstone Media). However, a very important type of species has been missing in Yellowstone National Park for a very long time....   [tags: Conservation]
:: 6 Works Cited
1822 words
(5.2 pages)
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Reintroducing the Wolf to Yellowstone - Reintroducing the Wolf to Yellowstone Wolves have always been a symbol of the wild, free in spirit and roamers of the land. These animals are considered majestic and protectors of the wilderness. They have always roamed the western United States, although their population has fluctuated over time. Over the past 10 years wolf reintroduction into Yellowstone National Park has been a controversial topic to those of the United States. As of 1995, wolves have been reintroduced into the park. This has come with some strong opposition and yet has prevailed....   [tags: Wolves Park Animals Papers]
:: 13 Works Cited
4205 words
(12 pages)
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The Reintroduction of the Gray Wolf to Yellowstone - The Reintroduction of the Gray Wolf to Yellowstone Gauss’ Law states that no two organisms can occupy the same ecological niche without excluding the other, but what happens when man gets involved with nature and tries to introduce a species where it doesn’t belong which in turn provides a second organism to fill the same niche as the first. The results of human intervention have often been disastrous for the organism that we’re supposedly helping. Humans often times do not understand the complexity of the implications that are caused directly through our intervention....   [tags: Environment Wolves Species Essays Papers]
:: 14 Works Cited
1484 words
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Yellowstone National Park and the Comming Super Eruption - Earth has physically changed millions of times due to moving tectonic plates which has formed our planets mountains; altering the way our environment looks. Volcanoes, (formed when magma from the upper mantle heads to the surface, causing the land to rise) are one of nature’s finest spectacles. These geographical forces have erupted many times; from small-scale eruptions to cataclysmic ones; making them a force to consider about. Therefore the past is useful in predicting possible future eruptions as in terms of the effects they can have on civilisation, they are unpredictable in what they can produce....   [tags: super volcano]
:: 7 Works Cited
1131 words
(3.2 pages)
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Volcanic Activity at Yellowstone - Yellowstone is a national park covering 3,468 square miles in Wyoming, Idaho, and Montana and it is elevated 8,000 feet from the ground on a plateau. But is there still present volcanic hazard in Yellowstone. The park is covered with over 10,000 geysers, hot springs, mud pots, and travertine terraces, perhaps caused by a ?hot spot. that it overlies. A violent history suggests equally as devastating future volcanic activity, underground forces are causing the landscape to change and geysers to become more active....   [tags: essays research papers] 460 words
(1.3 pages)
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The Yellowstone Wolf Controversy - One of the biggest reasons for the reintroduction of wolves back into Yellowstone was that they had originally roamed from Yellowstone all the way down to Mexico. While a lot of people were in favor of the reintroduction of the wolves, there were many who were against it. The main people who were against the reintroduction of the wolves back into the park were the ranchers who made a living in the areas surrounding the park. During 70 years of absence from the Rockies, the Grey Wolf had been protected under the Endangered Species Act that was passed in 1973....   [tags: Nature Animals Ecology Essays Papers]
:: 6 Works Cited
1463 words
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Restoring Wolves to Yellowstone - Restoring Wolves to Yellowstone In his book, Never Cry Wolf, Farley Mowat tells an Inuit tale, saying that in the beginning, caribou were created for humans to hunt. However, humans “hunted only the big, fat caribou, for they had no wish to kill the weak and the small and the sick,” creating a weak population of caribou. The creator then made wolves to eat the sick, weak, and small caribou, creating a natural health and balance to the earth (124). Humans have traditionally seen wolves as a competitor and a danger, but these misconceptions can now be put to rest....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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1693 words
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Yellowstone National Park - Yellowstone National Park Yellowstone National Park is one of the largest and oldest national parks in American history. Yellowstone was the first park to be protected by private investment on March 1, 1872, and the first to be put under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service in 1918, no doubt due to its unique and inspiring landscape and geothermal features. In fact, Yellowstone National Park is home to half of the world’s total hydrothermal features. These awesome attractions draw an incredible amount of visitors, an average of two to three million each year, to Yellowstone’s immense landscape....   [tags: Parks Recreation]
:: 5 Works Cited
1252 words
(3.6 pages)
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The Wolves Are Back - ... It may not be a bad thing if wolves were eventually relisted as endangered at some point in the future. The federal Government would have to protect them, and hunting the wolves would be banned. Another example of the wolves being protected can be found in the article “A Howling Success,” “In July, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) published its proposal to classify the gray wolf from endangered to threatened status in 16 northern states” (Daerr). It is saying that the reintroduction was very successful and that they were moved from endangered to threatened status....   [tags: wolves decline in yellowstone]
:: 1 Works Cited
834 words
(2.4 pages)
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Preventing Extinction and World Change - Thirteen years ago, wolves were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park. Of two potential locations considered (Snowflake Springs and Butte Rock) they were placed in the low-risk prey Butte Rock for the purpose of encouraging the wolves to spread out and create packs. Before and during the reintroduction project, Oregon State University researchers measured the rate of willow growth along 2.6 miles of the Gallatin River, which ran through Butte Rock and Snowflake Springs. During their study from 1998 to 2002, the researchers discovered that Snowflake Springs, where the elk were and no wolves lived, the willow growth dropped from 92% to nothing (“How Wolves Help Willows,” 4)....   [tags: animals, Yellowstone, Extinction, linguistics,] 1188 words
(3.4 pages)
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Pollution In The Backcountry - Snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park - Outline Of Pollution in the Backcountry 1. Bush over turns Clintons plans to ban snowmobiles in Yellowstone National Park. (pro) a. Yellowstone will continue to be polluted and degraded. (con) 2. Business, Industry and environment. a. Two opinions presented by each side 3. Identifying problems with the over turning of the Clinton administration ban. 4. Identifying problems with the pollution in off road vehicles. 5. Identifying propaganda techniques used by either side. 6. How credible is each side of the debate....   [tags: Politics Environment National Parks Policy] 1849 words
(5.3 pages)
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Wolf Reintroductions - Wolves were once the most widely distributed mammal on the planet. With their exceptional ability to adapt, wolves occupied almost every habitat except tropical jungles. But with the arrival of humans, wolves numbers diminished. Systematic eradication programs were aimed at top predators; this, along with over-hunting of prey populations and habitat loss due to population encroachment, wolves were eliminated from most of the contiguous United States by the 1940s. In 1973 wolves were finally put under the protection by the Endangered Species Act, and just recently wolf populations are increasing due to wolf recovery and reintroduction projects....   [tags: Environmental, Endangered Species, Yellowstone] 1011 words
(2.9 pages)
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The World's First National Park. - On March 1, 1872 President Ulysses S. Grant signed a bill into law that established the Yellowstone region of what is now Wyoming, Montana and Idaho as the worlds first National Park. The park was not greeted with much local support following its creation. Those living in the Yellowstone area believed their economy and industry would suffer after the lands fell under government control. To the contrary the towns bordering the park have boomed as a result of their proximity. After seeing the environmental, cultural and monetary results, the nature conservation movement as well as businesses began to see the benefits of protecting lands for public use....   [tags: National Parks, Nature Conservation] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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What Exactly Are Super Volcanoes? - Volcanoes have been around for many centuries and will continue to exist for many more to come. Many people have their ideas of what they believe volcanoes are. Most believe that it is basically a mountain that shoots out lava, destroying anything and everything nearby. This assumption is actually proven accurate. Volcanoes are considered one of the most dangerous natural disasters; they can erupt suddenly, destroying everything in its way. People tend to be so afraid of volcanoes that most of them don’t realize that there is one concept far more terrifying than just a volcano: a super volcano....   [tags: geological features]
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2157 words
(6.2 pages)
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Review of Wolves and the Ecology of Fear: Can Predation Risk Structure Ecosystems? - In this article, authors William Ripple and Robert Beschta focus on the issue of predation and the way it affects biodiversity and otherwise alters ecosystems. While many other studies have stressed the lethal effects of predation by carnivores, the authors of this study have chosen to focus on how nonlethal outcomes of predation affect the structure and function of ecosystems. The authors give two main objectives to their study: first to provide a short synthesis of the potential ecosystem responses to predation risk in a three-level trophic cascade involving large carnivores, hoofed animals, and vegetation; and secondly to present research that centers on wolves, elk, and woody browse spec...   [tags: Ecology] 744 words
(2.1 pages)
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Our Trip to Wyoming was Beautiful - ... That night I remember watching Close Encounters right by the mountain. Our cabin was right in front of devils tower and at the last part of the movie it was filmed right was we were staying. Then we wanted to make no stops from here to Yellowstone. Driving along by the mountain near Yellowstone they told us to go around but we did not want to waste 2 hours so we went up the mountain nice and slow. Since the mountain was so steep it burned our tires. When we reached Yellowstone we made my dad pull over and we stopped at Yellowstone Lake....   [tags: geysers, bison, mountains] 1077 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Eruption of Toba: A Supereruption - ... 1.4 Overview of Report The geological settings of Toba will first be discussed in this report. This includes the involvement of the tectonic plates as well as the interaction and the history of formation that resulted in such a massive eruption to occur. Following this, the supereruption itself will be discussed in detail, also known as the Youngest Toba Tuff. Finally, this report will touch on the global effects that occurred from this eruption and how it relates to the most recent genetic bottleneck and the limitations of this theory....   [tags: Catastrophe, Nature, Geology] 1643 words
(4.7 pages)
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Protect the Gray Wolves - ... The long term goal for the environmentalists and Yellowstone park rangers would be to have around 1,000 wolves roaming the region. The declining wolf population has turned around and is now increasing at a steady pace. The National Park Service says “During the 1980s, wolves began to reestablish breeding packs in Northwestern Montana; 50-60 wolves inhabited Montana in 1994.”(NPS) We are very fortunate for the quick acts of transferring the wolves from Canada down to the Yellowstone National Park and to the intense research that has been done over the last twenty years....   [tags: hunters, livestock, ranchers] 1993 words
(5.7 pages)
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Wolves in the Wild and Their Place in Nature - Your children are starving, the winter is approaching and it is your responsibility to feed your family, their extended family, and the entire pack. Under these circumstances even you would kill an elk or two. In 1995, 14 wolves were brought from Canada into the Yellowstone National Park, in an effort to see how they would affect the ecosystem if they were reintroduced into America. The two decades after the wolves were integrated into the park has been filled with conflict as citizens fight for or against reintroducing wolves country-wide....   [tags: yellow stone, ]
:: 10 Works Cited
1131 words
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National Parks or National Problems? - A bear meanders across the road several hundred yards in front of your slowly moving vehicle. A doe and her fawn leap back into the brush as you approach. The sun shines in such a way that it seems the mountains above you go on forever. This pristine image of our nation's national parks is unfortunately getting harder to find today. The approximately 270 million visitors to the parks annually have begun to take their toll on the wild and preserved areas of our nation. Congress created the world's first national park, Yellowstone, in 1872....   [tags: Critical Thinking Essays]
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3001 words
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Wolves, Wild, Again - Wolves, Wild, Again For my last web paper, I thought I'd return to one of my childhood obsessions - wolves. Ever since seeing a cartoon rendition of the story "Mowgli's Brothers" from The Jungle Book (the real thing, not the horrible Disney "interpretations" of it) I fell in love with the idea of wolf-hood. Wolves were once an essential part of our "American culture" and although we drove them away and killed them off in our own country long ago, their importance in the American mind has not decreased....   [tags: Animals Wolves Nature Essays]
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1324 words
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A Human For Nature - A Human For Nature When looking at the issue of humans and nature throughout history, one significant figure stands out in my mind: Theodore Roosevelt. Without him, the most beautiful and serene places in North America may have been destroyed or fallen to the hands of developers. Development and conservation of land have been issues that we have faced since Europeans first landed in America. Today, environmental issues are a concern that any contending political candidate must address. In focusing on Theodore Roosevelt, we will find a basis for preservation in America....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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1597 words
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Viewing America with Geology - ... This is one, but not the only way to make the phenomenon we know as earthquakes. This fault has not only caused trouble in the past but is likely to bring devastating destruction in the relatively near future. San Francisco had an earthquake, because of this fault, in April 1906 killing over 700 people and causing millions in damage (San). If a new earthquake were to happen it would kill thousands of American citizens along the west coast. Consequently, there would be a major drop in population over there which could reduce the amount of production created in this region all tying back into why the geological aspect of America is a main determining factor for seeing the importance of why...   [tags: geological history, san andres fault]
:: 4 Works Cited
907 words
(2.6 pages)
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Returning the Wolves to the Wild: The Restoration of a Great Predator - A beautiful, clear night in the Rocky Mountain backcountry, stars fill the moonless night sky, and one can not help to think of how peaceful it is. Traveling through the backcountry, you have encountered more wildlife than you have people. Suddenly, the silence of the evening is interrupted by the howl of a wolf, alerting all to its presence. The howl is soon answered by another, closer howl. You can feel the hair stand up on the back of your neck as you realize that you are not alone in the wilderness, with the top predator lurking nearby....   [tags: Wolf Reintroduction]
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2357 words
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Global Warming Endangers the Lives of Grizzly Bears - Global Warming Endangers the Lives of Grizzly Bears There are less then 1000 grizzly bears left in the lower 48 United States, around 400 of them live in Yellowstone National Park. These endangered, and beautiful bears, are threatened by many factors, most significantly the fragmentation of their habitat by roads. The latest threat to this species is the Global Warming trend that is threatening the White Bark Pine Tree, which is very important to the grizzly bear diet. Grizzly bears need to eat a great deal of fat in the fall in order to prepare for hibernation....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers] 782 words
(2.2 pages)
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how come - Grazing ecosystems support more herbivore biomass than any other terrestrial habitat (Sinclair 1975, Detling 1988, McNaughton et al. 1989, 1991, Huntly 1991). A functional consequence of this disparity in trophic structure emerges by comparing the relationship between aboveground production and herbivore consumption in the Serengeti and Yellowstone ecosystems with that in other terrestrial ecosystems [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3 OMITTED]. For consumption measurements, we included plant material removed by all important herbivores, both vertebrates and invertebrates....   [tags: essays research papers] 4911 words
(14 pages)
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Supervolcanoes and The Extinction of The Human Race - Supervolcanic eruptions are very large volcanic eruptions. None have been witnessed in recorded human history, but the evidence of them can be found in the geological record. While infrequent, a supervolcanic eruption is slightly more likely on average than a meteorite impact of comparable size, and they are capable of producing devastating effects. Previous supereruptions have been linked to mass extinction events. If one were to occur in the near future, it is possible it would cause the extinction of the human race....   [tags: supereruptions, Pacific Ring of Fire]
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1576 words
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The Benefits of Hunting in Our Society - ... He says, "beavers are ecologically extinct in the parks, because of a lack of willow, aspen and cottonwood(Key)." The elk are eating up all the prime beaver food and dam building material. The growing populations have forced the elk to eat things they have never needed to eat before, such as lodgepole pines in Yellowstone. As Kay noted the vegetation is becoming rare in some areas, taking away from the natural beauty of the park(26). Tennessen also tells of other problems besides low vegetation caused by the overpopulated elk herds....   [tags: maintaining a balanced ecosystem] 1573 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Effects of Wolves on Game Populations - ... (1) “Wolves hunt by going out in packs and working together to catch their prey. They surround the animals they hunt, weak deer or elk, and use their fur as camouflage to get close. When they get close enough they attack as a unit and take down their meal.” Many wolves are like house cats in the way they hunt sometimes, they kill more than what they need. Wolves are opportunist hunters which means that if they have the chance to kill they will. So say they killed a deer yesterday and ate it, if they had that chance to kill one today chances are that they would attack a second time....   [tags: environmental measures and effects] 1059 words
(3 pages)
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The Harms of Losing Predatory Animals - ... Wolves have been hunted nearly to extinction since the 1500’s in Europe, and then in America later. Mountain lions have been hunted for the same reason as bears since humans first began to spread through America. They were hunted for their meat and pelts without even a second thought about what might happen to the forest without the silent predators. The loss of predators is a huge problem to the environment. When one species is affected, it begins a domino effect on the rest of the animals in the area....   [tags: environmental issues, natural balance] 828 words
(2.4 pages)
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It's Time to Protect the Endangered Wolf - Three little pigs dance in a circle singing "Who's afraid of the big, bad wolf?" Little Red Riding Hood barely escapes the cunning advances of the ravenous wolf disguised as her grandmother. Movie audiences shriek as a gentle young man is transformed before their eyes into a werewolf, a symbol of the essence of evil. Such myths and legends have portrayed the wolf as a threat to human existence. Feared as cold-blooded killers, they were hated and persecuted. Wolves were not merely shot and killed; they were tortured as well....   [tags: Environment Essay]
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2903 words
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Grizzly Bears in North America - Grizzly Bears in North America Introduction The Grizzly bear (Ursus arctos) has long been considered to be the symbol of the wild. They are beautiful, powerful and at the same time vulnerable animals. They are known to survive in remote areas not inhabited by humans. The Grizzly was once able to occupy most of the land from northern Mexico to Alaska and most places in between. With a disappearing natural habitat and one of the lowest reproduction rate of any mammal in North America the Grizzly bear has seen population number fall dramatically....   [tags: bear, mammals, animals, ursus arctos]
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1791 words
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The Importance of Wildlife Conservation - Imagine a world with barren trees in overgrown fields. The only sound to be heard is the wind blowing through the tall grass. A world once full of life now lays empty do to extinction. This is the result of a world that failed to understand the importance of wildlife conservation. Why is wildlife so important. What steps need to be taken to preserve wildlife. How can one become involved in wildlife conservation. These are all important questions that need to be explored in order to help maintain the delicate ecosystem on Earth....   [tags: ecosystem, earth, extintion]
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1626 words
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Why Timothy Treadwell Deserved to be Attacked by a Grizzly Bear - ... The bears (grizzlies, brown, and other varieties) found in Alaska are among the largest on earth. Grizzly-human interaction is best done minimally, if at all: the only reason that bears do not react as quickly as they might to humans (considering them prey) is that in their habitats, they have access to plenty of food and they do not consider humans a territorial threat, so the usual reaction of a bear to a human in the wild is mild curiosity, then indifference. This general lack of reaction to his presence lulled Treadwell into thinking that the bears were tolerating it, and then to the ultimately fatal assumption that they were mutual friends....   [tags: foolish, anthropomorphism, danger] 542 words
(1.5 pages)
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Digital Image Analysis Of Yell - Digital Image Analysis of Yellowstone National Park Introduction Remote sensing refers to the tele-observational surveying and mapping of physical, urban and environmental features. Remote Sensing is also a composite of many other subjects such as aerial photography, radar surveying, thermal surveying, weather forecasting and photogrammetry. It has now become quite common practice to use remotely sensed data to take inventory, monitor and develop effective management practices of our natural resources....   [tags: essays research papers] 632 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Rhetorical Force of Landscape Art - The Rhetorical Force of Landscape Art Why talk about a rhetoric of images. The most obvious answer is that we live in an image-saturated society and a relevant rhetoric must pay attention to images, that W. J. T. Mitchell is right when he suggests that the rhetorical turn is being displaced by the pictorial turn. Beyond the obvious, the answers are multiple and layered. I want to suggest some answers by looking at some old pictures: Carleton Watkins' landscape photographs of Yosemite and William Henry Jackson's landscape photographs and Thomas Moran's water colors and paintings of Yellowstone....   [tags: Art Artistic Arts Essays]
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1513 words
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How many wolves are too many? - In 1922 the federal government passed a law that allowed wolves in Yellowstone National Park to be hunted. In just four years later the last wolf was hunted. In 1995, the gray wolf was reintroduced to the park. The government started off by introducing 31 wolves in the Montana and Wyoming parts of the park. Now 116 wolves now live and more then 75 pups. The controversy surrounding the reintroduction of the wolves are many from both sides. Some local farmers are against it because some wolves hunt their animals....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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770 words
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History and Future of Wyoming’s Droughts - History and Future of Wyoming’s Droughts The Great Basin of North America and Wyoming specifically, is known for its arid and semi-arid environment, as well as prolonged and sometimes severe droughts. Drought is the prolonged and abnormal deficiency of moisture with the concomitant decline in runoff to a level significantly lower than usual (Guldin 1989). The history of droughts in Wyoming has been uncertain in the past, but recent studies of tree rings in the Big Horn Basin of Wyoming have given insight to droughts as far back as 1260A.D....   [tags: Wyoming Weather Drought Essays Papers]
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990 words
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Thomas Moran - One of the most well known parks in the United State is Yellowstone. One of the most well-known landscape artists is Thomas Moran. What does this place and person have in common. Well, if it weren't for Thomas Moran Yellowstone would not be a National Park. Thomas Moran's art was greatly influenced by the nature of the west in the early romantic era. Born in Bolton, Lancashire, England in 1837, Thomas was taken to the United States at the age of 7. (Ency. Bio. Vol. 11). He was educated in Philadelphia public schools for his elementary years and then indentured to a wood engraving firm in 1853-1856....   [tags: essays research papers] 702 words
(2 pages)
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Nonunion Companies Creating Automobiles in the United States - “We as a corporation cannot afford to have union automobile plants in the United States any more than the union can….We cannot compete with a nonunion company building automobiles at the prices I think they can do it at in the country” (pg.103 Reynolds, 1986). Alfred Warren, GM Labor Relation Vice President was unable to conceive the thought of nonunion companies making automobiles in the United States, but that day is here. Right-to-work states have seen a significant increase in the amount of automobile companies opening plants in their states....   [tags: Business Management ]
:: 4 Works Cited
1210 words
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Will the World Really End in 2012? - December 21, 2012: This date has many people wondering why scientists and researchers assume the world will come to an end. Generally, everyone is captivated on the concept of the world’s execution. Hollywood even created a film based on 2012. But is the world really going to come to an end. Are we really going to die because of some calendar that is almost done. Is a giant flare from the sun going burn us all, or an enormous volcanic eruption from a super volcano going to destroy the earth. Considering how we were to have a meltdown in 2000, it is unlikely the world will end....   [tags: 2012, world ending,]
:: 12 Works Cited
997 words
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Wolves: The Things You Didn’t Know - Canis Lupus, the Latin term for the “North American Wolf”. A meat eating mammal with the capability of weighing up to 180 pounds and reaching a height of sixty-three inches, the wolf is easily the largest member of the canine family. Over 500,000 wolves once lived in harmony, roaming the Northern Americas alongside the Native American tribes and the rest of the ecosystem. Wolves live in packs, a pack essentially being a family. While the average size of a pack is six to ten, the largest confirmed pack recorded in North America can be found in Yellowstone National Park where the “Druid Pack” numbers thirty-seven strong and counting....   [tags: Canine Family, Canis Lupus, Mammal, Carnivore]
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881 words
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The Evolution and Development of Snowmobiles - Snowmobiling in today’s world is far more exciting and dangerous than it used to be in the 20th century. There are many types of snowmobiles and different capabilities for every make, model, and year. Every single snowmobile is different in its own way. Many snowmobiles have evolved and developed into amazing machines that are a great source of entertainment. Polaris Industries Incorporated is the largest manufacturer of snowmobiles in the world today. Polaris snowmobiles were first introduced in 1954....   [tags: snow vehicles]
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The Inheritance Cycle by Christopher Paolini - ... The oceanic crust of Vroengard plate juts against the Alagaësian Teirm plate. At some point in Alagaësia's geologic history, the Spine was created by the Vroengard plate subducting beneath the Alagaësian continental plate of Teirm. Though there is no mention of volcanoes in the Spine, the Vroengard plate does seem to have a volcano near Vroengard's city of Dorú Araeba (see figure 1. to compare Dorú Araeba and know volcano in city of Farthen Dûr.) The inferred presence of a volcano on Vroengard is in accordance with theories of plate tectonics and subduction areas where the oceanic crust would have melted....   [tags: fanatasy literature] 1894 words
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Parks, Moments and Forests Endangered - Parks, Moments and Forests Endangered One of the best ideas this country did was the creation our system of national monuments, parks, and forests; as well used as a model for our state parks. Historically, parks and forests were the domain of the very rich, influential, and the powerful where they could hunt and relax. Here in the United States that mindset prevailed that until the mid-1860s. With the discovery in the early 1800’s by who were called mountain men of boiling hot mud, steam being emitted out of the ground, water being ejected out of the ground that at first was dismissed as nonsense and was dubbed “Colter’s Hell” (Burns)....   [tags: Conservation ]
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Parks, Monuments and Forests Endangered - One of the best ideas this country did was the creation our system of national monuments, parks, and forests, this model was used in the creation of our state parks. Historically, parks and forests were the domain of the very rich, influential, and the powerful where they could hunt and relax. Here in the United States that was the mindset that prevailed until the mid-1860s. With the discovery in the early 1800’s by who were called mountain men, they described boiling hot mud, steam being emitted out of the ground and water being ejected out of the ground....   [tags: Our National Parks]
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The Beautiful State of Montana - Montana Essay Montana is a part of the country that many people do not know much about its history. Montana is divided into two parts, East and West. Eastern Montana is part of the Northern Great Plains and has played pivotal roles in American history since the early 1800’s. Western Montana is a history made up of gold rushes and the Copper King Marcus Daly. The history of Montana is that of many tales from Montanan Indian Tribes going back hundreds and thousands of years before American expansion into the region....   [tags: American history and territories] 2640 words
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Fur Trade - The first company to set up a trading post on the Pacific Northwest coast was the Pacific Fur Company. John Jacob Astor, a wealthy New York fur merchant, decided to organize the Pacific Fur Company to open up the unexplored territory west of the Rocky Mountains. Astor's fur enterprises were well established east of the Rockies. He hoped to gain control over the entire American fur trade. In September, 1810, two parties, representing Astor's Pacific Fur Company, set out to establish the first trading post on the Columbia River....   [tags: Economics] 1419 words
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Hunting is Necessary - In American culture hunting has always been a way of life. The Indians and our forefathers hunted to survive. Now in the nineties it is not viewed as a way of life, but as a thirst for blood. Is it necessary, or as stated before, a thirst for blood. What most people don't know is that without it, the ever increasing population of deer and other animals could be environmentally devastating. People should realize that without hunting, animal populations are in danger. Hunting is beneficial to sustaining animal populations and controlling the problems that overpopulation create....   [tags: Environmental Preservation Essay] 2354 words
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Lewis and Clark Expedition - Even before buying Louisiana, Jefferson sponsored an exploratory mission to the Pacific Ocean to strengthen U.S. claims to the West. Jefferson selected his private secretary, Meriwether Lewis, to be captain of the enterprise for his scientific interests and wilderness experience. Lewis chose good friend, William Clark, to assist with the enterprise for Clark had experience with nature and a familiarity with Indian character. Jefferson had these two men and their crew follow the Missouri River to fill in the gaps of knowledge that existed in the West....   [tags: American History, Thomas Jefferson]
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A Greater Intelligence Revealed in Dwellings - A Greater Intelligence Revealed in Dwellings Linda Hogan writes in her preface to Dwellings that "there is a terrestrial intelligence that lies beyond our human knowing and grasping." This is the main point that is constantly reiterated throughout the book, and this is the point that makes the book so important. The trouble with the earth today is that humans have become too smart; so smart that they question everything they once took for granted, and being unable to explain it, discount it as unreal....   [tags: Dwellings Essays] 934 words
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My Trip - experience to go places and see things where something historical or amazing happened, or to see a view so wonderful that I cannot even grasp its beauty. When I travel I have enormous amounts of me time. It’s nice and peaceful. I can lose all my worries in the many different and beautiful places I visit. The most enjoyable and extensive trip I have taken so far was in 2001 when I was ten; I traveled all over the USA for five weeks. Everything about the trip was enjoyable. Even getting ready was enjoyable....   [tags: Travel] 1141 words
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Super Volcanoes - Super Volcanoes There is no exact definition for a super volcano, but the expression is often used to refer to volcanoes that have produced extraordinarily large eruptions in the past. When one of these large eruptions occurs, a huge amount of material is blasted out of the super volcano, leaving a massive crater or caldera. A caldera can be as much as forty or fifty miles wide. At Yellowstone, the caldera is so big that it includes a fair amount of the entire park. In effect, it is so big that at first scientists didn't see the state a caldera had until it was photographed from space....   [tags: Papers] 747 words
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Wolf Population Control - The wolf is an incredibility majestic creature of the wild. Centuries of hunting have pushed the wolf to the brink of extinction. Man decided to bring back the wolf, but it took many years before their numbers came up enough to be taken off the endangered species list. Now the wolf is abundant with overwhelming numbers. In 2009, a law was enacted allowing people to go out to the local Fish and Game office and buy a license to hunt wolves. In Idaho, this only costs eleven dollars and seventy-five cents....   [tags: Conservation]
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John Davison Rockefeller Junior: A Great Philanthropist - “I know of nothing more despicable and pathetic than a man who devotes all the hours of the waking day to the making of money for money's sake.” This quote by John D. Rockefeller Junior captures the virtues by which he tried to live his life. In this statement, he is proclaiming his disgust with people whose only objective in life is the greedy acquisition for wealth’s sake alone. So, it was only natural that he devoted his life to philanthropy, which is in direct contrast to the greedy individuals to which he referred in his quote....   [tags: American History] 556 words
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Going Out West - Going out west last summer was one of the most exciting and interesting things I have ever done in my life. When my mom first told me about the trip I was only really excited about going on the airplane. But when we got there, I was in for a big surprise. One of the worst parts of the trip was that my family and I had to wake up at 3:00 AM to catch the plane in Manchester. We flew from Manchester to Cleveland Ohio, and then from Cleveland to Salt Lake City, Utah. I had a lot of fun on the plane....   [tags: essays research papers] 559 words
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An Outline for a Book Report: A Short History of Nearly Everything - ... He helps to widen the knowledge of people who are not experts in the field of science, or whom did not feel that had absorbed enough information in school and are still seeking the knowledge. 5. Speaker: Bill Bryson is the narrator, and he writes in first person. This demonstrated when he give examples from his life and using sentence referring to himself. For example, “I am delighted that you could make it” (1). III. Critical Analysis and Evaluation 1. Logos: Bill Bryson argues in A Short Story of Nearly Everything that as humans we are extremely lucky to be on Earth....   [tags: science, bill bryson, ethos] 934 words
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To Save or Not To Save - That Is the Question - When you look at a bald eagle, you see how powerful and majestic this bird is, which is how many people feel about the United States; that’s why the bald eagle is our national emblem on our Great Seal. It would be a dishonor to our Nation to have such a worldwide-recognized symbol of The United States extinct, but in fact that’s exactly what almost happened. To help the bald eagle regain it’s numbers, on December 28, 1973, President Richard M. Nixon signed The Endangered Species Act. “The law established procedures for conserving plants and animals in danger of extinction and those that are threatened, or likely to become endangered in the foreseeable future (Cooper, “Endangered Species Act”...   [tags: Conservation ]
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Affect of Technology on The Parks and Recreation System - The creation of the computer and the Internet has significantly furthered and revolutionized Parks and Recreation Districts across the country. Parks and Recreation Management is a profession that has been able to prosper with the Internet and personal computers today. Recreation in the present day is becoming especially popular due to a general decrease in working hours because of the economy. With many people having more free time, more demands are put on the Parks and Recreation districts. Also with the many national, state, and private parks in the United States, it is crucial for the park systems to have a systematic approach to dealing with these new demands....   [tags: Technology] 1025 words
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A Demographic Analysis: The Idaho Falls, Idaho Metropolitan Area - Introduction Idaho Falls is home to one hundred and thirty thousand three hundred and seventy four people. Located on the Eastern edge of Idaho, Idaho Falls is a focal point for much of Idaho and Western Wyoming. While conducting demographic research on the metropolitan area, I found some interesting stats. Using the demographic indicators of age structure, racial diversity, and family makeup, provided me essential data that describes the makeup of its metropolitan area. Basic Facts about the Metropolitan Area Idaho Falls is the states largest city outside Boise metropolitan area....   [tags: Demographics]
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The Career, Persona, and Presidency of Theodore Roosevelt - Theodore Roosevelt was one of the most influential people in the early 20th century. His leadership style, his reforms, and his personality shaped an America that was rapidly becoming a world power. Theodore Roosevelt is admirably remembered for his energetic persona, his range of interests and achievements, his leadership of the Progressive Movement, his model of masculinity and his “cowboy” image (). He was a leader of the Republican Party and founder of the short-lived Progressive Party of 1912 ()....   [tags: presidents, Theodore Roosevelt, history, USA, ] 696 words
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Overlap in the Theories of Chagnon and Morgan - Cultural anthropology is defined as a branch of anthropology deals with human culture, especially in respect to social structure, language, law, politics, religion, magic, art, and technology (“Defining Anthropology”). In this essay, I will talk of the lives of two very prominent anthropologists. The first is Lewis Henry Morgan who was active in the late 1800s and second, the controversial anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon who started his work in the 1960s. Even with the large gap in time, quite a few of their ideologies and theories do overlap....   [tags: Cultural Anthropology, Anthropologists]
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Causes, Impacts, and Potential Solutions of Invasive Species - Introduction Globalization has successfully increased the amount of trade, transport and tourism around the globe; however, it also facilitates the introduction and spread of non-native species. These alien species are intruders that are not indigenous to a particular ecosystem. Successful alien species become invasive by out-competing native organisms for food and habitat, causing harms to the local ecosystem. Invasive species are believed to be one of the leading threats to native wildlife. They also adversely affect people’s health and the economy standing behind the ecosystem....   [tags: lake trout, tourism, ecosystem]
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Opponents to Drilling in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge - ... Opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge [ANWR], federally protected land, would also be likely to cause severe environmental problems that would persist long after the oil in the region dries up (Smith). The Refuge is among the world’s last true wildernesses. And it is one of the largest sanctuaries for Arctic animals… [I]t is a vital birthing ground for Polar Bears. Grizzlies, Arctic Wolves, Caribou and the endangered Shaggy Musk Ox [A Mammoth-like survivor of the last Ice Age] (Document E)....   [tags: Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Resources]
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Climate Change: What is the Fate of Humanity? - “Oh Beautiful for smoggy skies, insecticide grain, for strip-mined mountain's majesty above the asphalt plain. America, America, man sheds his waste on thee, and hides the pines with billboard signs, from sea to oily sea” (Carlin). Climate change is the changes in climate patterns. It has been presented as the overlying reason for planetary destruction. However, the issue with climate change is not the detrimental effects it has on the Earth, mass extinctions have occurred in the past; the problem is that the superfluous exploitation of fossil fuels has compromised the survival of the human race....   [tags: global warming, environmental issues]
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Analysis of the Painting Great Detonators by Acamonchi - ... First of all, through the use of scale, Acamonchi communicated ideas regarding mass produced waste in his piece the Great Detonators. Scale is the principle of design that refers to the physical size of the piece’s elements, which dramatically affects its meaning. For example, Acamonchi’s painting the Great Detonators has a dimension of 8 ft. wide and 8 ft. long. Additionally, the large-scale felled trees painted with oil and acrylics are the predominant images in this collage. Another example, are the X marks crated with tape....   [tags: issues, waste, poticial, urban, chaos] 816 words
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Jim Kjelgaard the Author of Big Red - James Arthur Kjelgaard, otherwise known as Jim, was born December 10, 1910 in New York, New York as one of six children. Most of his childhood was spent growing up on a farm in the Pennsylvanian mountains. He was a writer and conservationist who loved animals and nature; one of his greatest loves was dogs. After marrying his wife, Kjelgaard’s most famous novel was published, Big Red; it was the story of a loyal companionship between a man and dog (Zietman). He combined personal experiences from his boy-hood with the animals he loved; he wrote many popular children’s stories before his tragic death at age forty-eight (Olendorf)....   [tags: biography, stories, tragic death]
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Finding a Balance Between Nature and Man - ... Two concepts we use referring to nature frequently arise. The "refined" view from the well-to-do city dwellers pictures nature as a wondrous landscape of majestic mountains and terrain. The second is that nature is extinct. Since neither concept is wrong, it gives us bad insight as how to properly interact with nature. Others have realized the public misunderstanding of nature. William Cronon tells us about living in an industrial world, while pretending to ourselves that our real home is nature, in a essay called "The Trouble with Wilderness"....   [tags: preserving the environment, no littering] 949 words
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Taking a Look at the Blackfoot Tribe - ... The 1874 Executive Order moved the southern boundary north from the Sun River to the Marias River. President Grant was pressured to restore some of the lands that had been taken away with the 1873 and 1874 Executive Orders and finally decided to restore them in the year of 1875. This land was taken back again in 1880 when President Rutherford B. Hays issued his own Executive Order to take back this land that President Grant had restored. The relationship between the US Government and the Blackfoot tribe has kind of been all over the place....   [tags: Native Americans, reservations] 853 words
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It's Possible to Reverse Global Warming - The Industrial Revolution began in the United States in the 1800s. During this time the demand for goods increased because of new transportation systems like the steam boat and locomotive, these inventions made it easier and cheaper to transport goods across land or water. Therefore, factory production increased to meet the country’s demand of many goods. This era marked the beginning of global warming because factories were powered by coal, and as a result increasing greenhouse gases. A greenhouse gas is “a gas such as carbon dioxide, ozone, or water vapor that contributes to the warming of the Earth’s atmosphere by reflecting radiation from the Earth’s surface” ....   [tags: Climate Change, Argumentative Essay]
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The Dream World of Jerry Uelsmann - Born in 1934, Jerry Uelsmann grew up an inner city kid of Detroit. In high school, Uelsmann worked as an assistant for a photography studio; he eventually photographed weddings. Uelsmann went to Rochester Institute of Technology (RIT) where he met Minor White, who “introduced [him] to the concept that photography could be used for self-expression” (Berman). While at RIT, he studied with Bruce Davidson, Peter Turner and Car Chiaraenza, with whom he held frequent discussions on how photography could be different....   [tags: Photography]
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A Brief Look at Geothermal Energy - ... When the Middle East resolves its crises, oil prices fall along with the investment in geothermal energy (Savage 10). In the United States, geothermal energy has received the most interest due to the current unrest (Savage 10). “For example, from 1972 to 1977, about 150 new geothermal cells were drilled compared to about 140,000 oil wells.” (Savage 12). The funding for geothermal research in 1976 reached $91 million. When compared to 1973, the funding had increased by nearly 40 times more (Savage 12)....   [tags: alternative energy sources] 646 words
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A Social Worker in Helena Montana - ... Bishop John Carroll selected the site for the building of the Cathedral church. A man by the name of Von Herbulis was requested to be the architect. Mr. Von Herbulis was trained abroad and was chosen because of his wide knowledge of the Cathedrals of Europe. Mr. Von Herbulis’s gothic form was chosen and approved unanimously by the Building Committee and Advisory Board. (“sthelenas,” n.d.) When I think of Helena and a “reputation” I think of historic. It is known throughout the town and celebrated by all who live here....   [tags: cultural competence, racial make up] 1756 words
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