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Victorian Era: The Start of Corruption in Moral Values - ... Due to the unhappiness and dissatisfaction, the women craved for change. Instead of standing by and following rules, the women started to push for a change. Beginning in the 1840's “a series of laws were passed that began to allow women in marriage to have a bit more control” (Victorian Society). These laws started the change process and slowly, women started to gain more rights that allowed them more freedoms. With laws such as the Infants and Child Custody Act of 1839, the Matrimonial Causes Act/Divorce act of 1857, the Married Women's Property Act of 1870, and the Custody Acts that started in the 1870’s, the Victorian women started to gain control....   [tags: World History ]
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1586 words
(4.5 pages)
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Mockery of Victorian Values in Hecht's Parody, Dover Beach - Hecht's parody "Dover Bitch" is a mockery of Victorian values shown in "Dover Beach", as well as those of his own period. Hecht candidly exaggerates the speech, ideas and symbols in "Dover Beach.". The first evidence of Hecht's mockery is of speech at the beginning when he writes " There stood Matthew Arnold and his girl......All over, etc., etc.". He take the soft calming words of Arnold and gives them a harsh New Jersey accent. His representation of an educated woman sets the reader up to think that the woman will not sit quietly and be told what to do by her husband....   [tags: Dover Beach] 352 words
(1 pages)
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The Impact of Social Class Divisions on the Women of Victorian England - The Impact of Social Class Divisions on the Women of Victorian England Two hundred years ago, during the reign of Queen Victoria in England, the social barriers of the Victorian class system firmly defined the roles of women. The families of Victorian England were divided into four distinct classes: the Nobility or Gentry Class, the Middle Class, the Upper Working Class, and lastly, the Lower Working class . The women of these classes each had their own traditional responsibilities. The specifics of each woman’s role were varied by the status of her family....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1352 words
(3.9 pages)
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Post-Modern Victorian: A. S. Byatts Possession - Post-Modern Victorian: A. S. Byatt's Possession If I had read A. S. Byatt's novel Possession without having had British Literature, a lot of the novel's meaning, analogies, and literary mystery would have been lost to me. The entire book seems one big reference back to something we've learned or read this May term. The first few lines of chapter one are poetry attributed to Randolph Henry Ash, which Byatt wrote herself. Already in those few lines I hear echoes of class, lines written in flowery Pre-Raphaelite tradition....   [tags: essays research papers] 1401 words
(4 pages)
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Victorian Gothic Literature: Scientific vs. Medieval Thinking - Victorian Gothic Literature: Scientific vs. Medieval Thinking        Creatures of the night have always held a fascination and horror for people in all cultures. The English fascination with sensational and gothic literature came to a peak, after slacking slightly following the Romantic period, in the late Victorian period with such works as Dracula, The Strange Adventures of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and The Picture of Dorian Gray. The literate populace avidly devoured this type of literature....   [tags: Literature Essays Literary Criticism]
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1750 words
(5 pages)
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Dickens's View of the Middle Class in Victorian Society - Dickens's View of the Middle Class in Victorian Society As exemplified throughout contemporary literature of the nineteenth century, the Victorians were in the midst of social, political, and economic turmoil that would generate vibrations throughout all social classes. The emergence of a new, mercantile middle class was driving all classes towards a society based on capitalism. Competition was arising between the middle class and the aristocracy for a secure social position with little, if any, concern for integrity and moral values (Joyce 299)....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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2416 words
(6.9 pages)
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Victorian Men and Women's Fears of Educating Women - Victorian fears of educating women were addressed in Martha Vicinus' novel, Independent Women. However I think that one very important issue not discussed in by Vicinus was the joint and separate fears of men and women of educating women. I also think that these fears were not realized entirely in her book and during the Victorian period. In order to determine if their fears were realized we need to look at the individual fears and also apply whose fears they were. I will examine the three view points that I think had the greatest fears and realizations of educating women; men and women together, then men and women's separate fears....   [tags: European History] 1065 words
(3 pages)
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Exploration of How Males are Presented in Victorian Short Stories - Exploration of How Males are Presented in Victorian Short Stories Charles Dickens was a prominent author who wrote on the historical eighteenth century issues relevant to the Victorian context. He wrote the following short stories and novels, Captain Murderer, Sikes and Nancy and the Great Expectations. In these stories there are three comparable characters that I am going to compare and contrast. These characters are Captain Murderer (from Captain Murderer), Sikes (from Sikes and Nancy) and finally Magwitch (from Great Expectations)....   [tags: Papers] 748 words
(2.1 pages)
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Women and the Poor in Victorian England in Jane Eyre - How does Bronte explore the position of women and the poor in Victorian England throughout her novel Jane Eyre. Jane Eyre was Charlotte Bronte’s first successful novel. Published in 1847, Bronte presents us with critique of Victorian assumptions regarding social class and gender. Way ahead of its time, Charlotte Bronte (or publicly none as Currer Bell), caused much commotion critically. In her novel Bronte explores many issues of Victorian society such as women’s stature both generally and amongst poor in the 19th century....   [tags: English Literature] 2308 words
(6.6 pages)
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"The Age of Innocence" - Women's Struggle With Victorian Dogma - ... Her “admirable career” claimed the titles of The House of Mirth, Edith Frome, and several others that captivated the American and European publics. The Age of Innocence, however, won her a Pulitzer Prize. She won it for the works “silver correspondences”, its wisdom, and its highest standard of American manners and manhood.” Wharton’s works were very well-liked, as were several of his other novels and short stories. Like Fitzgerald and Kästner, several of her works were best sellers converted into films as evidence of her popularity....   [tags: Literature Analysis] 807 words
(2.3 pages)
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Victorian Society's Treatment of the Poor in Oliver Twist - How does Charles Dickens expose Victorian society's awful treatment of the poor. In my essay I am going to talk about the way Charles Dickens uses Oliver Twist to expose the maltreatment of the poor, by analysing the text. In the early 19th century the industrial revolution started (the building of lots of factories and mills) which drew many countryside paupers into the towns. They hoped for a better life and job, but this was seldom the case because conditions were bad and wages were a pittance even if they were lucky enough to be employed....   [tags: English Literature] 2522 words
(7.2 pages)
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Tennyson's Princess - The Woman's Cause Is Man's - The Woman's Cause Is Man's Alfred Lord Tennyson, the author of The Princess, 1847, was born as the fourth of twelve children on August 6th, 1809, in Somersby, Lincolnshire to George and Elizabeth Tennyson. In 1827 he began his higher education at Trinity College, Cambridge; where he won university prizes for his poetry and became involved in an undergraduate club, The Apostles, which greatly influenced his life and later works. Tennyson died on October 6, 1892 at the age of 83 years after enjoying a delayed but satisfying and profitable literary career (Everett) The Princess was the work that turned Tennyson's struggling career around and laid the foundation for his continued success and ultimate acclaim as the Poet and Prophet of the Victorian era....   [tags: Tennyson Princess Essays] 1006 words
(2.9 pages)
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Legal Aspects of "The French Lieutenant's Woman" - The French Lieutenant's Woman is a novel which takes place in England in the Mid-Victorian period (1867). This story is about Charles Smithson, a discontented bachelor who had an affair with a prostitute named Sarah Woodruff (a lady's companion and former governess). As a result of his affair with Sarah, Charles breaks his engagement to Ernestina Freeman. After breaking his engagement he learns of the disappearance of Sarah and hires detectives to find her. Meanwhile Mr. Freeman, father of Ernestina threatens to file a suit against Charles for breech of promise of marriage....   [tags: American Literature] 580 words
(1.7 pages)
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Mill, Carlyle and Tennyson on “The Woman Question” - ... He rejects sexual inequality in both domestic and social contexts. He wrote, “That the principal which regulates the existing social relationships between the two sexes—the legal subordination of one sex to another—is wrong in itself, and now one of the chief hindrances to human improvement; and that it ought to be replaced by a principal of perfect equality, admitting no power or privilege on the one side, nor disability on the other.” (http://www.constitution.org/jsm/women.htm) Mill argues that the status of women can be compared to slavery, stating, “Marriage is the only actual bondage known to our law....   [tags: Gender Issues]
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901 words
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How Foreigners And Woman Were Perceived - ... (752) The emphasis placed on civility and English manors compel Helen to protect the reputation of her own abuser. So engrained in her are the ideals of English propriety that Helen is willing to withhold and hide the very physical effects of her abuse at the hands of her stepfather. In fact, Helen “coloured deeply, and covered over her injured wrist” (755). Helen is embarrassed by the fact of her own abuse and even goes so far as to make excuses for her stepfather's behavior, describing him as “ a hard man....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Doyle, Stoner] 1768 words
(5.1 pages)
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Discovering a Woman's Role in Pride and Prejudice - ... It was not until the late Victorian Movement, that there was a surge in women’s rights. In 1882, the Married Women’s Property Law was passed, identifying a woman’s right to own, buy and sell property. It also obligated that the British courts to recognize a wife and husband as two separate legal entities. However, in the Regency period, women played an inferior and weak role in a society dominated by males. Despite the constrictive nature of the Regency period, Austen’s Pride and Prejudice taught an important lesson to women; that women must make men worthy of their love....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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2457 words
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The Woman in Black - Production and design discussion - The Woman in Black - Production and design discussion Choose a production you have seen during your course, in which the quality of the design made a positive impression on the audience. Discuss in detail one scene or section that particularly impressed you. You will need to refer to the way in which the design elements helped make the production more effective. On the 7th November, we went to see the production of 'The Woman in Black' at the Fortune Theatre in Covent Garden. The play was adapted from a novel by Susan Hill and it incorporated several themes which built up the overall sense of fear which was created in the performance....   [tags: Drama] 936 words
(2.7 pages)
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Woman of the Year: Queen Elizabeth the Second - Woman of the Year: 1953-Queen Elizabeth II From the day she was born, the life of Queen Elizabeth II shows that she deserved to receive the title “Woman of the Year.” She had practical intelligence since she was a kid and she respected peoples opinions. Queen Elizabeth II was born on April 21, 1926 at the London home of her mother's parents, Lord and Lady Strathmore. She was baptized at Buckingham Palace and named Elizabeth Alexandra Mary five weeks later. Elizabeth's father was Albert, the Duke of York....   [tags: essays research papers] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Woman Question: The Oppressed Other Half - ... These writers also demonstrate the commonly accepted idea that women must be reliant upon men. From almost the beginning of time, women have been dependent upon men for their livelihood but in many cases they also relied on men to find their self worth. Mill notes that everything a woman has is because of the men in her life. “…the wife’s entire dependence on the husband, every privilege or pleasure she has being either his gift, or depending entirely on his will; and lastly, that the principal object of human pursuit, consideration, and all objects of social ambition, can in general be sought or obtained by her only through him…” (Mill, 1064), Mill illustrates here how a woman is entirely dependent upon her husband for everything....   [tags: Gender Studies]
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1687 words
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Victorian Literature: Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There - ... The queen mentions the royal messenger is in jail for a crime he did not commit yet. She also feels the pain of a needle from her brooch before she pricks herself (Carroll 94-101). Manners, just like in Victorian society, play an important role in the looking-glass world. The motif of reversal also exaggerates the backwards rules of decorum to emphasize their silliness. For example, when Alice is coronated at the eighth square, the Red and White Queens argue with Alice over proper speech and manners....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1292 words
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A Comparison Between the Victorian and the Contemporary Couple in A.S Byatt's Possession - A Comparison Between the Victorian and the Contemporary Couple in A.S Byatt's Possession Possession contains two love stories: a contemporary one and a Victorian one whose plots are interlaced, and not as its subtitle suggests a single one: "A Romance". It is a novel about a pair of young scholars who trace the correspondence between two Victorian poets. The contemporary love story between Roland Mitchell and Maud Bailey develops in parallel with and is intermingled with the story of the Victorian lovers, Randolph Henry Ash and Christabel LaMotte, since the modern academics' quest for knowledge of the past drives the modern romance....   [tags: Papers] 3527 words
(10.1 pages)
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Bram Stokers Dracula: A Struggle to Maintain Victorian Upper and Middle Class - The Victorian men and women conveyed in Bram Stoker's Dracula are pure and virtuous members of the upper and middle class. However, hiding behind this composed and civilized conception of England lies a dark and turbulent underbelly. This underbelly is the lumpenproletariat, whom Karl Marx defined as "the lowest and most degraded section of the proletariat; the ‘down and outs’ who make no contribution to the workers cause". Victorian culture discriminated against these vagrants, who were seen not only as shiftless and immoral, but dangerous as well....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1836 words
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Profound Duplicity Exhibited by Jekyll as a Reflection of the Victorian Way of Life - Profound Duplicity Exhibited by Jekyll as a Reflection of the Victorian Way of Life The Victorian society was filled with many divisions. It consisted of two extremes, the very wealthy and intense poverty. It was these divisions that contributed to the causes behind the life of Henry Jekyll to be split between the two. However, there are many other reasons as to why Jekyll wanted the best of both worlds. Within the Victorian period, there were many successes, including inventions such as the first public railway link between the coal mines of Darlington and the port of Stockton; this was built by an engineer named George Stevenson....   [tags: Papers] 1518 words
(4.3 pages)
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Hard Times Depiction of the Position of Young Women in Victorian England Society - ... Dicken’s doesn’t see women as being below education, as young women within the novel are all educated. The education that they receive at the Gradgrinds household and at the local Choakumchild School is far from ideal because it is too much focused on facts. Louisa, who has “been so well trained” that she is unaccustomed to romantic views. Mr. Gradgrind has ensured that Louisa has been educated to view “everything from the strong dispassionate ground of reason and calculation (Dickens 129). The education and training that Louisa receives removes her of any ability to feel or recognize any emotions....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1190 words
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The Repression of Women in Victorian Society as Shown in 19th Century Literature - The Repression of Women in Victorian Society as Shown in 19th Century Literature 19th century literature reflects to a certain extent, several ways in which women were repressed in Victorian society. They were considered inferior to men, and given a stereotypical image, showing them as gentle, loyal and angelic. They were rejected of any personal opinions or independence, for these were only a man’s privilege. Class and status also affected women of the era....   [tags: Papers] 844 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Treatment of Poor Children in Victorian Britain depicted in Oliver Twist - In this essay I will be writing about how Charles Dickens uses the story Oliver Twist to expose the appalling treatment of poor children in Victorian Britain. Oliver Twist was written in 1837–9, this period in Britain history was known as the Victorian period. Life in Britain was changing a lot at this time, more and more people were moving to the city due to the Industrial Revolution. Most of the people, who were moving to the city, were living in the country. There were a lot of negative effects of lots of people moving to the city, it was getting really overcrowded and there was a lack of housing....   [tags: English Literature] 1565 words
(4.5 pages)
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The Influences of Harsh Victorian Upbringing on Jane Eyre's Character and Development - The Influences of Harsh Victorian Upbringing on Jane Eyre's Character and Development Jane's early life experiences have a lasting effect on her developing personality and beliefs. Charlotte Brontë first introduces Jane as a vulnerable ten year old, orphaned girl who is pushed around and disrespected. This changes drastically during the course of the novel and ends with Jane being a happy, independent and respected woman. Jane Eyre is an autobiographical novel thought to reflect Charlotte Brontë's life, written by an adult but from a child's perspective....   [tags: Papers] 1337 words
(3.8 pages)
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Evolution of the Modern Woman in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse - Evolution of the Modern Woman in Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse examines the role of women or more specifically, the evolution of the modern woman. The two main female characters in the novel, Mrs Ramsay and Lily Briscoe, both represent different views on life and follow different paths on their search for meaning. Lily Briscoe transcends the traditional female gender roles embodied by Mrs Ramsay; by coming into her own as an independent and modern woman, she symbolises the advent of modernism and rejection of traditional Victorian values....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays Virginia Woolf ]
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1478 words
(4.2 pages)
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Comparing the French Lieutenant's Woman and Jewel in the Crown - Similarities between French Lieutenant's Woman and Jewel in the Crown       John Fowles's French Lieutenant's Woman and Paul Scott's Jewel in the Crown are two literary works that illustrate continuity in British literature over time.  While French Lieutenant's Woman [is set in]...the Victorian era and Jewel in the Crown [depicts events in]... the twentieth century . . ., the two exhibit similar thematic content.  Both works emphasize the importance of social stature, both portray society's view of what's acceptable in the intimate relationships of women, and both are stories in which two lovers are together regardless of whether or not society approves....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
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1005 words
(2.9 pages)
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Edna, the Anti-Mother-Woman in Chopin’s The Awakening - Edna, the Anti-Mother-Woman in Chopin’s The Awakening In short, Mrs. Pontellier was not a mother-woman. The mother- women seemed to prevail that summer at Grand Isle. It was easy to know them, fluttering about with extended, protecting wings, when any harm, real or imaginary, threatened their precious brood. They were women who idolized their children, worshipped their husbands, and esteemed it a holy privilege to efface themselves as individuals and grow wings as ministering angels. (29) She had all her life long been accustomed to harbor thoughts and emotions which never voiced themselves....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 568 words
(1.6 pages)
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Victorian Sexuality in Stoker’s Dracula, LeFanu’s Carmilla, and Polidori’s Vampyre - Victorian Sexuality in Stoker’s Dracula, LeFanu’s Carmilla, and Polidori’s Vampyre Literature is representative of the time in which it is produced. Literature can reflect societal views, attitudes, and fears.Vampire literature, in particular, often represents the fears of a society.In the Victorian Era, a time of intense sexual repression, it was common for vampire stories to reflect the fear of sexuality that was rampant in society. Bram Stoker’s Dracula illustrated fears about sexual women in contrast to the woman who respected and abided by society’s sexual norms....   [tags: Dracula]
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1689 words
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“How Do I Love Thee?” Understanding the Victorian Era Through Browning and Stickney Ellis - ... She writes that women possess a “secret influence” that functioned like a “second conscience” for men, for when he is troubled: “He has thought of the humble monitress who sat alone, guarding the fireside comforts of his distant home; and the remembrance of her character clothed in moral beauty, has scattered the clouds before his mental vision, and sent him back to that beloved home, a wiser and better man.” (1525-1526) It is this image that is the key to that Victorian model of a woman in the home, being the fixed moral center for a man....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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1181 words
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Societal Views of Women in the Victorian Era in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House - Societal Views of Women in the Victorian Era in Henrik Ibsen’s A Doll’s House A Doll’s House, by Henrik Ibsen, creates a peephole into the lives of a family in the Victorian Era. The play portrays a female viewpoint in a male-dominated society. The values of the society are described using the actions of a woman, Nora, who rebels against the injustices inflicted upon her gender. Women’s equality with men was not recognized by society in the late 1800’s. Rather, a woman was considered a doll, a child, and a servant....   [tags: Dolls House essays]
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901 words
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The Development of Jane's Character from Passionate Child to Independent Woman - The Development of Jane's Character from Passionate Child to Independent Woman Jane's character changes immensely throughout the course of the novel. In Victorian England, there were distinctive boundaries of social classes and I intend to study Jane's social elevation, from a destitute orphan to that of a beloved wife. When Jane was a child her parents died and she was sent to Mr Reed, her late mother's brother. "my own uncle - my mother's brother in his last moments he had required a promise of Mrs Reed that she would rear and maintain me as one of her own" Her uncle died and she was left with Mrs Reed and her three cousins who all despised her....   [tags: Jane Eyre Feminism Charlotte Bronte Essays] 2160 words
(6.2 pages)
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What Makes Jane Eyre An Unusual Woman For Her Time? - What Makes Jane Eyre An Unusual Woman For Her Time. Charlotte Bronte wrote 'Jane Eyre' in the mid nineteenth century. At this time women were treated as inferior and believed to be less capable then men. In the Victorian age this belief was widely accepted and most women would marry and have children. Women were generally expected to serve men; this meant many ladies were both emotionally and financially dependent on their husbands. The fact that most women abided by these traditional values meant that it was extremely difficult for women to get jobs in the Victorian age....   [tags: English Literature] 2992 words
(8.5 pages)
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Embittered Woman in Great Expectations, A Rose for Emily, and Sunset Boulevard - The Embittered Older Woman in Great Expectations, A Rose for Emily, and Sunset Boulevard        The character of the delusional, embittered older woman is prevalent in literature and movies. Since Dickens created the memorable Miss Havisham in Great Expectations, she has evolved with the times into many other well-known characters, including Miss Emily in Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" and Norma Desmond in the film Sunset Boulevard. In each of these incarnations, the woman seeks revenge after a man's betrayal prevents her from meeting society's expectations of women, but finds no peace in her bitterness and ends up becoming a shriveled shell of the person she once was....   [tags: Great Expectations Essays]
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An Artist in her Way: Representations of the Woman Artist in Margaret Oliphant's Kirsteen - Representations of the Woman Artist in Margaret Oliphant's Kirsteen Margaret Oliphant (1828-97) was a prolific writer. She published almost 100 novels as well as biographies, art criticism, travel writing, historical sketches, and over two hundred articlesfor periodicals like Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine andThe Cornhill Magazine, yet her ambivalence about representing herself as a serious artist in her Autobiography provides Oliphant aficionados with grist for speculation and conjecture: did Oliphant even think of herself as an artist....   [tags: Margaret Oliphant Kirsteen Essays]
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3226 words
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A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and An Ode Popular Superstitions of Highlands of Scotland - Comparing Unification in A Vindication of the Rights of Woman and An Ode on the Popular Superstitions of the Highlands of Scotland        In A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, Mary Wollstonecraft seeks to abolish repressive, orthodox conventions. She endeavors to abate manners that lacerate our society, that elevate man above woman, that prohibit equal exchange between the sexes. This unequal system of gender roles forms the basis of her argument. Wollstonecraft claims that civilization will not progress while half its population is subjugated....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
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2646 words
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The Ways in Which Narrative Perspectives Vary in The French Lieutenant's Woman and Hawksmoor - The Ways in Which Narrative Perspectives Vary in The French Lieutenant's Woman and Hawksmoor Although there are many different perspectives taken in the two novels that shape the overall theme of each plot, comparisons can be drawn between them to show that they share a few fundamental similarities in the way that the authors present their narrative. By looking at the this presentation, it is possible to extract that the authors share common ground in the role that they take in the novel, the post-modernist way they seem to perceive their own role as a novelist and their perspectives on the theme of time in a novel....   [tags: Papers] 3932 words
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The Life of the Governess Rebecca Sharp - The Life of the Governess Vanity Fair Sets the Stage “If Miss Rebecca Sharp had determined in her heart upon making the conquest of this big beau, I don't think, ladies, we have any right to blame her…” (Thackery 27). The narrator of Vanity Fair encourages readers not to blame Rebecca Sharp for being determined to win Joseph Sedley's attentions and proposal in only ten days. After all, the narrator reminds us that she was motherless, and thus had no one to help her secure a husband. Yet, members of Vanity Fair rebuke Miss Sharp for her assertive efforts....   [tags: Victorian Era]
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586 words
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19th Century Women - Missing Works Cited Purpose Statement: This paper will outline the role of women in society during the Victorian Era and present some real life examples from the Women's Diaries of the Westward Journey of 19th century women following their roles and at times having the those roles challenged by the difficulty of the trail. 19th-Century Women Women in the nineteenth century, for the most part, had to follow the common role presented to them by society. This role can be summed up by what historians call the "cult of domesticity"....   [tags: Victorian Era] 1661 words
(4.7 pages)
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The New Woman in Fanu’s Carmilla, Stoker’s Dracula, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer - The New Woman in Fanu’s Carmilla, Stoker’s Dracula, and Buffy the Vampire Slayer The correlation between the vampire, a figure that is usually regarded as the subject of social ostracism, and the New Woman, the advent of which was feared by the majority of the British Victorian patriarchy, was a prominent aspect of much mid-to-late Victorian era literature. Supplementary evidence to support the compelling Victorian era literary connection between the vampire and the New Woman can be extrapolated from the unique gender role standards that defined that socially complex era....   [tags: Buffy Vampire Slayer]
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2487 words
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Gender in Society as portrayed in Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Right Woman and D.H. Lawrence's Give Her a Pattern - In this essay I am going to show you how things like education, job and relationship between men and women have changed and things like support are still the same since Mary Wollstonecraft and D. H. Lawrence write about them. In the essay 'A Vindication of the Right of Woman' by Mary Wollstonecraft, the author urges women to reject their conventional image of weakness. Mary Wollstonecraft uses her style of diction to convince the reader of her ideas. D. H. Lawrence, in his essay, 'Give Her a Pattern' sketches some of the patterns imposed on women by men from eighteen to 21st century....   [tags: essays research papers] 899 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Woman as Muse and Begetter: Susan Barton’s “anxiety of authorship” in J.M. Coetzee’s Foe - ... In Foe, Susan Barton attempts to write her story while her hired writer, Foe, is absent, but constantly encounters difficulty. One contributor to Barton’s inability to write her story is her own disbelief that she is capable of doing so, which is exactly Gilbert and Gubar’s “anxiety of authorship.” Barton actually writes a short history of her time on the island which she sends to Foe, but writes to him, “‘it is a sorry, limping affair…but you will know how to set it right’” (Coetzee 47). That Barton believes herself incapable of writing well most likely stems from the patriarchal society in which she lives....   [tags: Literature Patriarchy]
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2461 words
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Portrayal of Jane Osborne in Vanity Fair - The Redundant Woman Thackeray’s portrayal of Jane Osborne in Vanity Fair is very troubling to the reader of the twentieth century. Grown to be a woman who is stuck under her tyrannical father’s roof, her life appears to be very confining and menial. Her sister snubs her, her nephew mocks her behind her back, her father mocks her to her face, and her main role in life seems to be as her father’s housekeeper. However, Thackeray’s portrayal would have had a very different effect on the Victorian reader....   [tags: Victorian Era William Thackeray]
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693 words
(2 pages)
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New Year's Changes in Henrik Isben's A Doll's House - In Victorian England, women were expected to be undoubtedly obedient to their fathers, and later in life, servile to their husbands as well. They were normally forbidden to pursue a real education, and would often “devote themselves to their husbands' happiness” (Roland 10). Throughout history, women have had to make sacrifices for other people's feelings and lives. They have given up their own lives, freedoms, education, and careers due to their concern for others. A concurrent injustice occurs in Henrik Ibsen's play, A Doll's House....   [tags: Victorian England, A Doll's House, ]
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1410 words
(4 pages)
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The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde - The novel ‘Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde’ was written by Robert Louis Stevenson in the Victorian era, which had a very different culture from today. The book was first published in 1886 in England and it brought success to the author. The Victorians had strict moral codes to live under as middle class people and had to be well respected to be considered as a good person. The character’s reputation emerges throughout the novel as an essential tool to success in the society of the era. Another Victorian value expected of them was to live a life without any sin and to obey the Bible as literalists....   [tags: Robert Luis Stevenson Victorian Era] 2938 words
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Female Characters in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Female Characters in Bram Stoker's Dracula Having studied Bram Stoker's Dracula as part of my GCSE English Course, I am going to consider the representation of women in the novel. The three main characters I will study are Mina, Lucy, and the three female vampires (belonging to Dracula). I am going to consider the similarities and differences of each character, and how well they compare to traditional Victorian women. I will support my answers with quotes and evidence. During the early twentieth century, the traditional Victorian ideal would be a lady of leisure....   [tags: Dracula Bram Stoker Victorian Women Essays] 1234 words
(3.5 pages)
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Role of Women in Jane Eyre - Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre represents the role of women in the Victorian era by giving the reader an insight into the lives of women from all social classes. Jane Eyre therefore represents figures of the Victorian time yet the character of Jane Eyre, herself, can be seen as very unconventional for the Victorian society. England, in the eighteenth century, was driven by class distinction and wealth. In the lower class there was always a desperate struggle to survive which contrasted to the life led by the upper class, socializing with people like themselves....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Woman Female Jane Eyre] 1506 words
(4.3 pages)
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Tess Of The D’Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - Is Tess a Pure Woman? - Thomas Hardy’s Tess Of The D’Urbervilles (A Pure Women) - Do You Agree with Hardy’s Subtitle, A Pure Women. ‘Tess Of The D’Urberville’ was written by Thomas Hardy in 1891. Tess is the main character who gets exploited by the character, Alec. The question is whether Tess is pure or not. The subject of purity caused a lot of controversy in the Victorian times. The dictionary definition of the word purity is that if someone is pure they are innocent, fresh, virtues, chaste and very trustworthy. Thomas Hardy English poet and novelist, famous for his dispictions of the imaginary county “Wessex”....   [tags: Tess Of The D’Urbervilles] 2591 words
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Repressed Sexuality in Bram Stoker's Dracula - Repressed Sexuality in Bram Stoker's Dracula       Perhaps no work of literature has ever been composed without being a product of its era, mainly because the human being responsible for writing it develops their worldview within a particular era.  Thus, with Bram Stoker's Dracula, though we have a vampire myth novel filled with terror, horror, and evil, the story is a thinly veiled disguise of the repressed sexual mores of the Victorian era.  If we look to critical interpretation and commentary to win support for such a thesis, we find it aplenty "For erotic Dracula certainly is.  'Quasi-pornography' one critic labels it.  Another describes it as a 'kind of incestuous, necrophilious, oral-anal-sadistic all-in-wrestling matching'.  A sexual search of the novel unearths the following:  seduction, rape, necrophilia, pedophilia, incest, adultery, oral sex, group sex, menstruation, venereal disease, voyeurism" (Leatherdale  155-156).  While there are many other interpretations of the novel, such as the vampire as a Satan figure who wishes to take away the mortality Christ won mankind, this analysis will explore how it reads as a story of repressed sexuality and the conflict it creates for the characters living in a repressed Victorian world....   [tags: Bram Stoker Dracula Essays]
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Dealing with Society Edna Pontelliers Battle with Social Class - Dealing with Society Edna Pontelliers Battle with Social Class Edna Pontellier, the main character in Kate Chopin’s novel The Awakening, is a woman trying to form her own identity, both feminine and sexually, in the repressive and Victorian Creole world of the latter nineteenth century. She is met by a counterpart, Mademoiselle Reisz, who is able to live freely as a woman. Edna herself was denied this freedom because of the respectable societal position she had been married into and because of her Presbyterian up bringing as a child....   [tags: essays papers]
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1935 words
(5.5 pages)
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The Representation of Family in Nineteenth Century English Art - The Representation of Family in Nineteenth Century English Art 19th century art gives us a great insight into Victorian society and culture, its hopes, fears, likes, dislikes, its ambitions and failures and its preconceptions and contradictions (The Victorian Web, 2003) . Each picture tells a story and provides us with a great record of Victorian culture and the thoughts and pre-occupations of people throughout the 19th century. The home and the family became the centre of 19th century life and the family was the most common of all Victorian paintings....   [tags: Papers] 1333 words
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History of Cosmetics - ... Some women went to great extremes in order to fit the standard of beauty during that time. For example, “paleness could be induced by drinking vinegar and avoiding fresh air,” said Pauline Thomas, Textiles and Design graduate and British qualified teacher (Thomas). American women today hold the exact opposite idea of beauty compared to the women from the Victorian Era. The main reason for this is because it is not a trend for women to look like a diseased patient anymore. American women wear makeup that gives them a healthy, glowing look....   [tags: Beauty ]
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Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and W.B. Yeats - Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and W.B. Yeats   Elizabeth Barrett-Browning and W.B. Yeats, examined together in the same sitting are as different as the Victorian and Post-Modernist eras they emerged from, yet they were both independent thinkers of their time.          Browning, born in 1806 before Victorianism came into full play, was celebrated as a woman poet but also quite conformist to the Victorian movement in some regards.  Browning did make use of her family's money to "give herself an exceptional education"  (1858) and she thought outside of traditional lines in regards to gender roles for women as in her poem "Aurora Leigh".  In this poem, the narrator is a woman which is unusual for that era "Place your fecund heart in mine, and let us blossom for the world"  (1877).  It was unusual in the Victorian era - to consider that women added anything substantial to a marriage relationship.  Browning was definitely independent in her thinking and in her personal life - defying her father by eloping with Robert Browning late in life  (1859).          There are other elements of her poetry that are fairly conformist to the Victorian age.  Her poem "Sonnets from the Portugese" describes a courtship that is prudent and in keeping with Victorian age.  This form of a sonnet was taken from Shakespeare's style, yet another element of Browning stepping into territory formerly only occupied by men  (1859).          W.B....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Free Awakening Essays: Romanticism - Romanticism in The Awakening Even though it was written in the Victorian era, Kate Chopin's The Awakening has several romantic qualities, especially with the main character, as she struggles between society's obligations and her own desires. Chopin writes about a woman who continues to reject the society around her, a notion too radical for Chopin's peers. Edna Pontellier has the traditional role of both wife and mother, but deep down she wants something more, difficult to do in the restricted Victorian society....   [tags: Chopin Awakening Essays] 528 words
(1.5 pages)
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On Feminism and Jane Eyre - ... Mr. Brocklehurst tries to further exert his power over the girls when he confronts Miss Temple about the lunch of bread and cheese. He thinks that since they did not eat breakfast they should not get lunch; he doesn’t want to “accustom them to habits of luxury and indulgence.” He continues by saying their sufferings should be comparable to those of the martyrs of Biblical times. He sets the standard at what he believes the girls, and by extension all women, should be once more. Another example is St....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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1267 words
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The Dichotomy of Honesty in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest - Oscar Wilde's, "The Importance of Being Earnest" revolves around the dichotomy of the true definition of honesty versus the victorian definition of honesty. It is apparent that Wilde's opinion is that true honesty is expressed through being genuine to one's self as opposed to putting on a front as is important in victorian ideals. In this work, Wilde uses humor to off-set the seriousness of the theme of the story. One who has studied this work can also clearly see that Wilde is using sarcasm to say things that would not have been accepted by society if they were said bluntly....   [tags: The Importance of Being Earnest] 537 words
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Female Rebellion In Aurora Leigh and The Lady in the Looking-Glass - Female Rebellion In Aurora Leigh and The Lady in the Looking-Glass      Women of both the ages of Victorian and early Modernism were restricted from education at universities or the financial independence of professionalism. In both ages, women writers often rebelled against perceived female expectations as a result of their oppression. To lead a solitary life as a subservient wife and mother was not satisfactory for writers like Elizabeth Barrett Browning and Virginia Woolf. One of the most popular female poets of the Victorian era, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, illustrated "a woman's struggle to achieve artistic and economical independence in modern society" (Longman P.1858)....   [tags: Aurora Leigh Essays]
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Women's Suffering - ... Any basic form of literacy was seen as a threat to the husband, and was usually prohibited (Garton, 52). Due to ignorance, men did not realize the personal gain they would receive if they allowed women to pursue education. Most successful relationships occur when both partners are helping improve one another (Mill, 65). If a man were to settle with a woman who had substandard education, he would never be able to self-improve (Mills, 65). This could be severely detrimental to a human to give up self-improvement....   [tags: Women's Rights]
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Timeless Message of Equality in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest - Timeless Message of Equality in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest   Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest satirizes Victorian society.  The witty epigrams of his characters provide light comedy masking the underlying theme of criticism of the Victorian way of life.  Wilde's effective use of humour diffuses the tense theme of his work.  In a Victorian society that emphasized progress, it was precarious for artists like Oscar Wilde to express an imperfect interpretation of life in nineteenth-century England.  Wilde's attack on the ethics of his era is an attempt to fulfill the author's prophecy that art has the power to dictate life, not merely imitate it (614-615).  At a time when the world measured progress in empirical research, Wilde chose to use the English language rather than the scientific method as his mean to transform society.  The Importance of Being Earnest satirizes two main social constructs:  social class and gender relations....   [tags: Importance Being Earnest Oscar Wilde Essays]
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1958 words
(5.6 pages)
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Essay - Bridge Between Worlds in Virginia Woolf's To The Lighthouse - To the Lighthouse - Bridge Between Worlds Virginia Woolf's To the Lighthouse illustrates a bridge between the worlds of the Victorian mother and the modern, potentially independent woman. The Victorian woman was to be absorbed, as Mrs. Ramsay is, by the task of being mother and wife. Her reason for existing was to complete the man, rather than to exist in her own right. Mrs. Ramsay certainly sees this role for herself and is disturbed when she feels, momentarily, that she is better than her husband because he needs her support to feel good about himself and the life choices he has made....   [tags: To The Lighthouse Essays] 461 words
(1.3 pages)
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Lady Audleys Secret - The Style and Genre of Lady Audley&#8217;s Secret Lady Audley&#8217;s Secret, by Mary Elizabeth Braddon, is a novel of many elements. It has been placed in many different style or genre categories since its publication. I feel that it best fits under the melodrama or sensational genre, and under the subgenre of mystery. It contains significant elements of both types of writing, so I feel it is best to recognize both, keeping in mind that melodrama is its main device and mystery is a type of Victorian melodrama....   [tags: essays research papers] 2374 words
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Comparing Christina Rosetti's Approach to the Subject of Death in After Death, Remember, Song and Dream - Comparing Christina Rosetti's Approach to the Subject of Death in After Death, Remember, Song and Dream Death was a favourite theme of the Victorian writers. Before antibiotics and a National Health Service it was common to die early in life from common illnesses such as tuberculosis and during childbirth. 50% of children died before the age of six in Hanworth, the Bronte sisters' village. The Victorians held expensive funerals that were showy and intrigued by the processes of decay, change and growth....   [tags: Papers] 868 words
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John Fowles - John Fowles It's A Boy. Robert and Gladys Richards Fowles give birth to a baby boy on March 31, 1926, in Leigh-on-Sea, Essex County, England. The proud parents have high hopes for their son and send him to two prestigious schools, Alleyn Court School (1934-1939) and Bedford School (1939-1944), where he excels in scholarship and sports. After his primary education is complete, the family moves from London to the Devon countryside, to avoid the invasion of troops in World War II. After serving two years in the Royal Marines (I 945 -1947), John Robert Fowles studied literature at Oxford University, graduating in 1950....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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Feminism in the Novel Jane Erye - The belief that women should have equal economic, political and social rights which were offered to men was known as feminism. Feminism has been a prominent and controversial topic in writing for over two centuries, with the view articulating in the “19th century meaning that women were inherently equal to men and deserved equal rights and opportunities.” (Gustafson, 1) Many women throughout time have stood forward towards women’s rights. Jane Eyre was written and published during the Victorian Era....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte, Literary Criticism] 1228 words
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The Sexual Expression of Women in Thomas Hardy's Writing - The Sexual Expression of Women in Thomas Hardy's Writing The nineteenth-century woman was defined by her adherence to submission and resistance to sexuality. She was portrayed by most writers as a naive, accepting figure with strong concerns about living up to the prescribed societal ideals for a respectable woman. The women in Jane Austen's novels offer a clear representation of the nineteenth-century woman. Austen refuses these women any sexual expression and focuses more upon their concern with marriage and society....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
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A Feminist Perspective of The Lady of Shalott - A Feminist Perspective of The Lady of Shalott        In an essay on feminist criticism, Linda Peterson of Yale University explains how literature can "reflect and shape the attitudes that have held women back" (330). From the viewpoint of a feminist critic, "The Lady of Shalott" provides its reader with an analysis of the Victorian woman's conflict between her place in the interior, domestic role of society and her desire to break into the exterior, public sphere which generally had been the domain of men....   [tags: Lady of Shalott Essays Feminism]
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Helen Stoner - Helen Stoner Helen Stoner is instantly stereotyped by readers as a judicious and unpretentious lady of high society England. Conan Doyle pulls the strings of the Victorian males desires and creates a 'damsel in distress', who comes to a man for aid that she does not have the resources to conclude herself. He portrays her as a woman who is wronged and in great danger therefore adding to the suspense of the story. Analysing the assortment of clothes that she is wearing the reader can conclude that she is of sufficient 'breeding' and discreet....   [tags: English Literature Helen Stoner Essays] 3662 words
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Split Sisters and Split Personalities of Goblin Market - Split Sisters and Split Personalities of Goblin Market       "I have 50 different personalities, and still I’m lonely" (Amos). Perhaps everyone is truly composed of multiple personalities embodied within one whole. Whether these split personalities are actual or purely metaphorical, no one human being has a single sided mind, and a single sided position on everything. Within the brain many battles are raged between opposing sides of issues, between the personalities. "Goblin Market" is one of Christina Rosetti’s "sister" poems, a form in which she used sisters to "represent different aspects of the split personality that was caused by conflicting attitudes and mixed emotions towards love" (Bellas 66)....   [tags: Goblin]
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A Tale of Two Hearts in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - A TALE OF TWO HEARTS While an artist uses a variety of colors and brushes to create a portrait, Charlotte Bronte used contrasting characters and their vivid personalities to create a masterpiece of her own. In her novel Jane Eyre, Bronte uses narration and her characters to portray the struggle between a society’s Victorian realism and the people’s repressed urges of Romanticism. In order to discern between the Victorian and Romantic themes, Bronte selects certain characters to portray the perfect stereotype of each theme....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays] 1170 words
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The Portrayal of Gender, Ethnicity and Class in Two of Arthur Conan Doyle's Stories - The Portrayal of Gender, Ethnicity and Class in Two of Arthur Conan Doyle's Stories Arthur Conan Doyle was a well known writer during the Victorian Era and still is today. He was famous for his stories. One of his books had a fictional character that caught people's attention. This character is a spectacular detective, Sherlock Holmes. People loved Sherlock Holmes so much because he always solves the case and always defeat evil. In fact, in one of Arthur's short story, 'The Speckled Band', Sherlock Holmes was described as "the Scotland Yard Jack-in-office" and "the busybody!" This period of time is called the Victorian Era because the ruler during this time was Queen Victoria....   [tags: Papers] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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great expectations - Should Great Expectations be considered a part of the canon of great literature based on its portal of social class issues in Victorian England. This is a question that has been pondered by many, but has a justifiable answer. This book should not be considered a part of the canon of great literature for several reasons, such as the rise in social class, marriage between classes, and the depiction of women. One reasoning as to why Great Expectations should not be considered a part of the canon of great literature is the constant rise of social class....   [tags: essays research papers] 619 words
(1.8 pages)
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Freud is Not Sexist - Freud is Not Sexist Many feminist critics have perceived Freud to be an active force in Victorian gender politics that claim women's inferiority. His attitudes towards women, as reflected in his psychoanalyses, consciously reflect the patriarchal assumptions of Victorian society, but unconsciously reject gender roles and stereotypes about women. Freud is therefore complicit in accepting sexist perceptions of women, but is not a perpetrator who attempts to entrench patriarchy by portraying women as inferior....   [tags: Papers] 2456 words
(7 pages)
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gender changes in the sun also rises - The Sun Also Rises, by Ernest Hemingway is a story of being apart of the “Lost Generation” in the 1920's. The Great War had changed the ideas of morality, faith and justice and many people began to feel lost. Their traditional values were changed and the morals practically gone. The “Lost Generation” rejected Victorian ideologies about gender, sex and identity. The main characters, Brett and Jake, redefine masculinity and femininity, drifting away from the Victorian ideals of sexuality and identity....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Morality in the Elizabethan Era - Morality in the Elizabethan Era Values and morals of the Victorian era are quite different than those that our society upholds today. The satirical plays, A Doll's House by Henrik Ibsen, and Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw, examine the problems with certain beliefs held by the people, both men and women, of the Victorian age. Furthermore, the people in general didn't not just hold certain morals, but the different classes in the Victorian society also held their own beliefs on moral code. Of which, the middle class beliefs are most closely examined in both plays....   [tags: Papers] 1097 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - The Oppressed Female in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre      In Jane Eyre, Charlotte Brontë clearly demonstrates the relationship between sexuality and morality in Victorian society through the character of Bertha Mason, the daughter of a West Indian planter and Rochester's first wife. Rochester recklessly married Bertha in his youth, and when it was discovered shortly after the marriage that Bertha was sexually promiscuous, Rochester locked her away. Bertha is called a "maniac" and is characterized as insane....   [tags: Jane Eyre Essays]
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899 words
(2.6 pages)
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Tess of the d'Urbervilles by Thomas Hardy - The Victorian Age was a virtuous era, full of chaste women and hard-working men. As with any seemingly utopian society, there are the misfits: those who always seem to go against the grain. Hidden in the shadows of towns were bastardized babies and public outcasts. The flourishing literature of the era attacks the societal stereotypes and standards that make for such failures and devastating tragedies. In Tess of the d'Urbervilles, by Thomas Hardy, Tess Durbeyfield's initial loss of innocence brings her down to an insurmountable low, and the victorian society, of which she is a part, dooms her to a horrible fate with its "normal" shunning of her innocent misbehaviors....   [tags: Literature Analysis Utopia] 1539 words
(4.4 pages)
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Poetry Of Robert Browning - Robert Browning used his poetry as a way of self-determination as many of the ideas expressed in his poems go against the current of the Victorian era. His poetry should be included in the texts list for the HSC because they not only offer examples of classic poetry but also provide insights into the 19th century English society in terms of behaviour, gender roles and religion. Three poems that are fine examples of this are "Porphyria's Lover", "My Last Duchess" and "The Laboratory." "Porphyria's lover" presents a man who is so restricted by his society's traditions and mores that he is driven to murder and sees it as a just action....   [tags: Robert Browning] 1713 words
(4.9 pages)
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Fire Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre - Fire Imagery in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre Incomplete Works Cited The prevalence of fire imagery and it's multitude of metaphoric uses in Charlotte Bronte's Jane Eyre expresses two things that could not be expressed openly in the Victorian Period, which are mainly passion and sexuality. Brontes writing was dictated by the morals of her society, but her ideas were not. Jane Eyre was written with the Victorian reader in mind. Bronte knew that if she were to write about these two things directly she would have to face possible rejection of her book....   [tags: Charlotte Bronte Jane Eyre] 2653 words
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