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Your search returned over 400 essays for "vaccine"
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Vaccine - This research paper consists of varying information coming from four published articles found on the internet related to whether the MMR vaccine causes Autism in children or not. According to the article MMR Vaccine (2010) in Black's Medical Dictionary, 42nd Edition there have been several studies and experiments performed and until this day, there is no direct link between the MMR Vaccine and Autism. Other researchers such as Robert M. Youngson (2004, 2005), who wrote in the Collins Dictionary of Medicine that: “No association has been demonstrated between autism and the use of the MMR vaccine.” (Youngson, 2004) An editorial by Stephen I....   [tags: Medicine, Autism] 1558 words
(4.5 pages)
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Public Health Concerns with the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine - ... This vaccine contains the VLP antigens for HPV 6, 11, 16 and 18, and is designed to protect against infection of these types (Stanleya, Lowy, & Frazer, 2006). These are both licensed and currently in use with in a number of countries. Clinical trials of both the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines have demonstrated a 90-100% efficacy in preventing precancerous cervical lesions attributable to HPV- 16 and -18, among women who were uninfected with those HPV types before vaccination and who received all three vaccine doses (Fernandez et al., 2010, p....   [tags: Health, Vaccine, Sexuality]
:: 12 Works Cited
1671 words
(4.8 pages)
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HPV Vaccine - ... In a column written for a famous medical journal, one reason opposition leaders are against a mandated vaccination system such as the one done by Perry is because of the fear that it would only increase the sexual activity of teenagers. This is an unproven claim as many are now aware of the dangers of contracting STD, cancer and even unwanted pregnancy because they have been properly educated by their families, by their teachers and by the environment around them. Teenagers are also properly educated at present and are now responsible enough to understand what risks would happen if they still push for unprotected sex....   [tags: Sexually Transmitted Diseases] 743 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Vaccine War - Through the rise of technological advances in medicine, the vaccine has changed the world for the greater good of the human race. Making a great triumph and virtually eliminating an array of life-threatening diseases, from smallpox to diphtheria, thus adding approximately thirty years to many humans’ life spans. Although, a new complication has arisen, possibly linking neurological digression with this rise of new vaccines. Such a digression has forced parents to exempt their children from receiving vaccinations and brought forth mental anguish affecting the minds of many....   [tags: Medical Ethics ]
:: 3 Works Cited
1168 words
(3.3 pages)
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Vaccine Testing - HIV Vaccine Testing in Africa The United Nations estimates that 5.8 million people per year become infected with the immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Ninety percent of these infections occur in sub- Saharan Africa, where infected persons do not have access to antiviral therapy. Approximately 2.4 million Africans died of AIDS in 2002, and 3.5 million occurred in the region. Where in the United States $12,000-$15,000 is usually spent on treating an HIV-infected person per year, only $6 is spent annually per person in Uganda....   [tags: essays research papers]
:: 2 Sources Cited
1091 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Polio Vaccine - The Polio Vaccine The discovery of the polio vaccine was an important medical and scientific breakthrough because it saved many lives since the 1950s. In the summer of 1916 the great polio epidemic struck the United states. By the 1950s hundreds of thousands of people had been struck by the poliomyelitis. The highest number of cases occurred in 1953 with over 50,000 people infected with the virus. When hygienic conditions were poor polio attacked infants. The disease was spread by contaminated water and contact with fecal contamination....   [tags: Papers] 1070 words
(3.1 pages)
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polio vaccine - Poliomyelitis (shortened to polio) has been around for thousands of years, and there is still no cure, but at the peak of its devastation in the United States, Dr. Jonas Salk introduced a way to prevent it. Polio attacks the nerve cells and sometimes the central nervous system, causing muscle wasting, paralysis, and even death. The disease, whose symptoms are flu like, stuck mostly children, and in the first half of the 20th century the epidemics of polio were becoming more devastating. Salk, while working at the Virus Research Lab at the University of Pittsburgh, developed a polio vaccine, and the medical trials to prove its effectiveness and safety are still being analyzed....   [tags: essays research papers] 617 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative - THE CANADIAN HIV VACCINE INITIATIVE Description- The Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative is a Canada based body, which works for the progress of HIV vaccines and testing method, at a global level. Though this organization was established by the Ministry of Canada, it involves enough cooperation and interactivity from other international organizations too. ________________________________________________________________________ Keywords- Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative, Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiatives, CHVI, Canadian Ministry HIV Vaccine Initiative, Initiatives by Canada towards AIDS, Canada Ministry’s initiatives for AIDS, HIV in Canada, Canada fighting HIV, Goals of the Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative, goals of CHVI, objectives of Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative, objectives of CHVI, Technical objectives of CHVI, collaborates of Canadian HIV Vaccine Initiative....   [tags: Health Care] 736 words
(2.1 pages)
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The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine - The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine The unforgettable story of vaccines is a story of triumph and controversy. The saddest part of the story is persistent ignorance and a lack of education, comingled with the personal need of some parents to explain away the problems of their children, have caused the controversy to arise. The good news is that the triumphant reality of vaccines as a whole is still the larger enduring legacy. The human papillomavirus vaccine is not an exception to this rule; in fact despite all the controversy surrounding the vaccine, it is one of medicine’s greatest lifesaving gifts to us....   [tags: HPV Cancer, Cervical Cancer]
:: 9 Works Cited
1596 words
(4.6 pages)
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Weighing the Benefits of the Gardasil Vaccine - ... (“MarketWatch - Stock Market Quotes, Business News, Financial News.”) However, there are over 100 different types of HPV; Gardasil only claims protection against the four most common strains of HPV. This does not offer immunity against 30% of HPV strains that are at fault for causing cervical cancer. (“Comprehensive Cancer Information - National Cancer Institute.”) Although, cervical cancer may be the second most common form of cancer found in women, it is also the easiest form to cure. Based on information by Doctor Diane Harper, whom is the lead researcher for the Gardasil vaccine, the Gardasil shot is completely unnecessary....   [tags: Cancer Preventon, Side Effects] 1007 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Importance of the Influenza Vaccine - Illnesses have long haunted the human race. As long as these illnesses have existed, humans have developed ways to cure themselves, beginning with simple herbs and proceeding as far as vaccines and complex medicines. One cure that long eluded scientists was that of the influenza virus. Now, the influenza vaccine, or flu shot, saves thousands of lives a year and helps prevent serious complications resulting from influenza infection. At no time was a search for the cure for influenza more frantic than after the devastating effects of the pandemic of 1918....   [tags: Health Care]
:: 6 Works Cited
1503 words
(4.3 pages)
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The Impact of the Tuberculosis Vaccine - The Impact of the Tuberculosis Vaccine Abstract Tuberculosis is one of the most infectious diseases in the world. With almost one third of the world infected with this virus, people are striving to help prevent the spread of this disease (NIAID, 2001). One prevention technique for tuberculosis is the BCG (Bacillus of Calmette and Guerin) vaccine. In the early twentieth century Calmette and Guerin worked together to isolate a strain of the disease creating the first BCG vaccine. Throughout the century the scientists improved the BCG vaccine and today there are several different strains of the vaccine available....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical Disease TB]
:: 5 Sources Cited
1623 words
(4.6 pages)
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Hiv: The Search For A Vaccine - In 1985, over 10,000 cases of AIDS were reported worldwide (White and Fenner 1986). Just over a decade later, in 1998, the Global AIDS Policy Coalition estimated that 30.6 million people were infected with HIV worldwide. It has also been projected that by the year 2000, between 40 and 70 million adults will be infected with HIV (New Generation Vaccines 1997). Over 90% of all HIV-1 infected individuals live in developing nations: 50% in Southeast Asia and 40% in sub-Saharan Africa. However, even with all of these alarming statistics and projections, there is hope for the future of humanity....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 2 Sources Cited
1319 words
(3.8 pages)
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2004 Influenza Vaccine Shortage - 2004 Influenza Vaccine Shortage Internal PR Action Plan MKT 438 November, 22, 2004 Abstract This year’s flu season is supposed to bring a strain of the virus with a severity unlike any other seen in previous years. This supposed new strain is a mutated, currently untreatable strain that is expected to be responsible for several deaths. The media has caused such a wide spread panic over the Influenza bug this year and then claimed that 48 million vaccines mysteriously became contaminated rendering the public virtually helpless against the attack of this new strain of flu....   [tags: essays research papers] 1401 words
(4 pages)
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The HPV Vaccine and Its Effect on Cancer Screening and Prevention - The HPV vaccine and its effect on cancer screening and prevention Introduction Human Papillomavirus(HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention(CDC) around 20 million people are infected with HPV and additional 6.2 million people are newly infected every year. According to National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey in 2003-2004 among sexually active women (57% of 14 to 19 years and 97% of 20 to 59 years) HPV was highest prevalent in youngest age group (40% of 14-19 years and 50% of 20-24 years)....   [tags: HPV Cancer, Cervical Cancer] 1653 words
(4.7 pages)
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Human Papilloma Virus Vaccine and Cervical Cancer - ... In stage one, squamous cells in the cervix’s surface layer are all normal, healthy epithelial cells. In stage two, infection of human papilloma virus in basal cells brings mild cell changes in normal cervix. If mutated cells are not repaired, it can lead to stage three, moderate cells changes that can develop to severe cell mutation in stage four. Although most mutation of cells are reversible with immune response before developed into an invasive cervical cancer, cervical cancer can occur if the infection of human papilloma virus has not been fully cured, especially accompanied by co-factors such as the dysfunction of immune system, chronic human papilloma virus infections and exposure to carcinogens....   [tags: mortality rate, prevention, health, Hong Kong]
:: 12 Works Cited
1788 words
(5.1 pages)
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The Science, Technology, and Ethics of HIV Vaccine Research - The Science, Technology, and Ethics of HIV Vaccine Research An annual report recently released by the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS indicated that the number of HIV-infected individuals increased 10 percent in the last year, bringing the number of people worldwide who are now carrying the virus to over 33 million. According to the report, half of these new infections were in people15 to 24 years old, and there were 11 new infections a minute. Sub-Saharan Africa reportedly accounts for two thirds of the infected population and about 12 million AIDS related deaths....   [tags: AIDS Third World Countries Poverty Papers]
:: 6 Works Cited :: 2 Sources Cited
4292 words
(12.3 pages)
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The Dynamics of the Dengue Fever Virus and the Creation of its Vaccine - The Dynamics of the Dengue Fever Virus and the Creation of its Vaccine Abstract: I investigated Dengue Fever and the dynamics of creating a drug or vaccine to cure it. After acquiring a basic knowledge of the virus I dove into various topics including variants on the virus such as Dengue Shock Syndrome and Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever. Then I looked into the molecular structure of the disease’s proteins and how their shape relates to how it can be treated by drugs. Professor Tantillo’s lectures about drug design, including pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and ADMET (Absorption, Distribution, Metabolism, Excretion, Toxicity) connected the concepts of protein molecular structure and effective ways to treat diseases....   [tags: Medical Biology Dengue Fever Virus]
:: 2 Works Consulted :: 2 Sources Cited :: 5 Sources Consulted
1301 words
(3.7 pages)
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Anthrax Prevention - Missing Works Cited Aside from treatments of the disease, there is also another way to fight anthrax: an anthrax vaccine. For some time now, a vaccine to protect animals from anthrax has been available. It wasn’t until “…1970, when a human vaccine was licensed called Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA)” (Joellenbeck). It was licensed for workers at high risk for occupational exposure to anthrax. The vaccine is “…a cell-free filtrate containing protective antigen as the principal immunogen” (Joellenbeck)....   [tags: Anthrax Vaccine] 809 words
(2.3 pages)
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Immunological Cures for Diabetes Mellitus Type 1 - ... When the body has low levels of Treg the body develops various autoimmune diseases. Since Treg can suppress autoreactive CD4 T cells that are activated by autoantigens from antigen presenting cells, the cascade of activation of the CD8 T cell would not occur. Treg can potentially be used to suppress autoimmunity in type 1 diabetes patients by the adoptive transfer of in vitro islet-specific Treg.1 Using islet-specific Treg to neutralize the T cells in the islets targeting the beta cells of the pancreas will preserve beta cell function....   [tags: Health, Self Vaccine]
:: 6 Works Cited
1126 words
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Role of Smallpox Vaccine in the Prevention and Treatment of Variola major and Variola minor - Role of Smallpox Vaccine in the Prevention and Treatment of Variola major and Variola minor Smallpox has claimed the lives of many ever since the Middle Ages. However, it has now been eradicated due in part to a very effective vaccine. The vaccine has saved the lives of thousands and has eradicated the disease in the history of man kind. This miracle vaccine can greatly diminish the effects variola and even stop the disease from becoming fatal. The vaccine is also the only known way to fight the smallpox, and until an antiviral agent is found, it will be humanity’s only defense against this deadly and devastating disease....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical]
:: 4 Sources Cited
1164 words
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The Vaccination Controversy - ... It is likely that at times many HCPs, if unconsciously, make parents feel inadequate for even questioning the safety and necessity of vaccinations for their children.14 By doing this, even with the best of intentions, HCPs run the risk of automatically closing the window of opportunity for an honest conversation about concerns and fear surrounding vaccinations. HCPs especially need to consider, before displaying any judgment or bias, that there are many reasons, apart from personal disagreement, why patients may seek vaccine exemption, including socioeconomic and language/cultural barriers.13,15 By maintaining open, receptive communication, HCPs, particularly nurses, have an opportunity to weaken those barriers, to help patients communicate their needs, and to empower them in receiving the care they choose surrounding vaccinations....   [tags: nursing, vaccine controversy, informed consent]
:: 18 Works Cited
2233 words
(6.4 pages)
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anthrax vaccine - A. Attention Getter 1. Yentl is born at wrong time and place to follow her dreams 2. Father says, “Yentl, you have soul of a man” 3. Yentl knows she does not want woman’s life 4. Could not do domestic thimgs like cook or sew 5. Thought women had boring life 6. Did not want to raise children B. Thesis statement 1. Yentl believed she had the soul of a man, but her Jewish background did not allow her to make the choices in life that she wanted. C. Overview 1....   [tags: essays research papers] 806 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Flu Shot Should Not Be Mandatory - Should the Flu Shot Be Mandatory. Vaccines have been proclaimed by many people as one of the miracles of modern medicine. Vaccines are credited with saving thousands of lives and wiping out many contagious diseases. Recently, there has been a tremendous debate whether annual influenza vaccines should be mandatory. Influenza vaccines should be voluntary because people have the right to examine data on vaccinations and make their own informed decisions. Although people should have the freedom to choose to be vaccinated, the public needs to be educated about the personal, economical, and social benefits of receiving the influenza vaccine....   [tags: Influenza Vaccine Papers]
:: 3 Sources Cited
1095 words
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Vaccinations - ... The second dose can be given as early as twenty-eight days later, but is usually given four to six years of age (“MMR Vaccine”). It is predicted that one out of one million will have a severe allergic reaction to the MMR vaccine (“MMR Vaccine”). The severe reactions to the vaccine are so rare that medical researchers do not know if the reactions are tied to the MMR vaccine (“MMR Vaccine”). One of six people will develop a slight fever after the first dose of the MMR vaccine (“MMR Vaccine”)....   [tags: vaccine, control, disease, life saving, death]
:: 16 Works Cited
1444 words
(4.1 pages)
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Austism and Vaccines - Every year, tens of thousands Americans die from the seasonal flu alone. This alarming statistic is what led the United States government to urge the country to vaccinate themselves, as well as their children every November, when the flu season is fast approaching. Though countless Americans do follow the government’s plea, many others insist that these vaccines distributed every year (as well as other year-long vaccines) contain an abnormally high amount of thimerosal, (a mercury-based chemical in vaccines designed to prevent the growth of bacteria) which could eventually lead to autism....   [tags: autism, vaccines, ] 632 words
(1.8 pages)
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Rabies Control - Rabies Control Rabies is widespread due to the lack of control, especially in third-world countries that obtain the virus usually through being bitten by the animals in the wild. Nevertheless, rabies cases overall has decreased compared to previous years due to increased restrictions that includes vaccinations and laws. This has made countries such as the United States and Great Britain average about only a couple of cases of rabies a year. Unfortunately, rabies will most likely remain as it is impossible to vaccinate every mammal and there are animals that can live successfully with the disease....   [tags: Disease Vaccine]
:: 4 Works Cited :: 1 Sources Cited
1607 words
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Vaccines Are Not the Cause of Autism - ... But some experts say better diagnosis could explain autism's apparent rise” (Glazer, 2003). Severe effects of vaccines are very rare plus there is no scientific evidence that some vaccines produced autism or comparable developmental or cognitive impairment. Countless deem that the definite reason for autism is not the dead or live virus found in vaccines but the derivatives’ within them. “Exposure to thimerosal, a mercury-containing preservative that is used in vaccines and immunoglobulin preparations, has been hypothesized to be associated with increased risk of autism spectrum disorder (ASD)” (Price, et al., 2010)....   [tags: vaccines, diseases, vacinations]
:: 5 Works Cited
620 words
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Vaccines - Introduction Vaccines against diphtheria, polio, pertussis, measles, mumps and rubella, and more recent additions of hepatitis B and chicken pox, have given humans powerful immune guards to ward off unwelcome sickness. And thanks to state laws that require vaccinations for kids enrolling in kindergarten, the U.S. presently enjoys the highest immunization rate ever at 77%. Yet bubbling beneath these national numbers is the question about vaccine safety. Driven by claims that vaccinations can be associated with autism, increasing number of parents are raising questions about whether vaccines are in fact harmful to children, instead of helpful (Park, 2008)....   [tags: Ethical Issues, Immunology] 1147 words
(3.3 pages)
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Smallpox Treatment - Smallpox Treatment Smallpox has threatened our world for the past twelve thousand years. Treatments were desperately searched for until a cure called variolation was discovered. Variolation is the use of the virus placed into a being to which they will receive the illness to a lesser degree and overcome the illness forming an immunization to it. This process was started in China and went worldwide after Lady Montagu took the process from Turkey and informed the British about it....   [tags: Vaccination Vaccine Variolation]
:: 5 Sources Cited
2114 words
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Influenza Vaccines - Influenza is an infectious illness that can be spread from one individual to the next. It can be transmitted by means of saliva, nasal secretions, feces and blood. It can also be spread by coming in contact with the virus on contaminated surfaces. Influenza is responsible for an average of 36,000 deaths and for more than 226,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States. (Davidson, 2007-2009, Davis, 2007). It is my goal for this paper to explain how flu vaccines are made, how long it takes to create the vaccines, and when they will be ready for distribution for the upcoming flu season....   [tags: Immunology]
:: 5 Works Cited
899 words
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Influenza Vaccines - Influenza is an infectious illness that can be spread from one individual to the next. It can be transmitted by means of saliva, nasal secretions, feces and blood. It can also be spread by coming in contact with the virus on contaminated surfaces. Influenza is responsible for an average of 36,000 deaths and for more than 226,000 hospitalizations each year in the United States. (Davidson, 2007-2009, Davis, 2007). Influenza viruses are divided into three classes. These are A, B, and C. Influenza A and B are blamed for the increases in hospitalization and deaths each year....   [tags: Disease ]
:: 5 Works Cited
839 words
(2.4 pages)
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Benefits of Vaccines - The controversy concerning vaccination for children has been a debate for many parents. A vaccine is defined as a biological agent used to prevent very serious illnesses and diseases, such as smallpox, measles, influenza, tuberculosis, and hepatitis by injecting a weakened infectious organism into the human body. When vaccines are given, the human body produces antibodies against the foreign substance, thus creating a defense mechanism for immunity to occur. Parenting decisions based on vaccinations are a sensitive matter in a child’s life....   [tags: Parents Should Have Their Children Vaccinated]
:: 11 Works Cited
2014 words
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The Pharmaceutical Industry and the AIDS Crisis in Developing Countries - The Pharmaceutical Industry and the AIDS Crisis in Developing Countries · Describe the nature of supplying drugs to emerging markets at an affordable price without undermining their profits · Research and analyse in depth the effectiveness of one proposed policy response to this issue. Introduction 1 2001 saw a flurry of events, as highlighted in the excepts of the case study, which caused an awareness by the international community of the inequality between rich and poor nations in the care and treatment of people living with HIV/AIDS....   [tags: AIDS Vaccine Drugs Supply Demand] 1837 words
(5.2 pages)
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The Benefits of Prolonging and Separating Vaccines - Parents today have many concerns for the well being of their child. One big apprehension is what vaccines are being introduced into their infant’s small bodies and the many adverse reactions they cause. In our current generation, infants are injected with up to 31 vaccines just in their first year of life (CDC, 2015). Life threatening diseases are prevented with such vaccines, but parents are often left to wonder, how many of these vaccines are even necessary. Many of the vaccines are given in combinations; sometimes three or more disease fighting vaccines are given in one inoculation....   [tags: Vaccination, Pros and Cons]
:: 5 Works Cited
2234 words
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Vaccines and the Prophylactic use of Antipyretics - ... These include treatment with gamma globulins or immune globulins, chemotherapy, and immunosuppressive therapies (Sorensen & Paris, 2012). There is no mention of antipyretic therapy’s effect on vaccine response in any of the previous articles. Two articles contained in the review of literature cite fever phobia as the likely explanation for parents treating the majority of fevers with antipyretics. Fever phobia is defined as the belief that fever, “can cause physical harm to children,” (Wallenstein et al., 2012, p....   [tags: pediatric care, healthcare, medicine]
:: 18 Works Cited
2523 words
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Edible Vaccines - Edible Vaccines Missing Works Cited Today eighty percent of infants are being vaccinated for diphtheria; pertussis (whooping cough), polio, measles, tetanus and tuberculosis (Landrige 2000). This percentage is up from about five percent in the mid-1970s; however, the death toll from these infections is roughly three million annually. Millions still die from infectious diseases for which immunizations are non-existent, unreliable, or too costly. Vaccines all function with the same idea in mind, priming the immune system to swiftly destroy specific disease-causing agents, or pathogens, before the agents can multiply enough to cause symptoms (Landrige 2000)....   [tags: Papers] 1600 words
(4.6 pages)
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West Nile Virus Vaccines - This first discovered virus was identified in 1937 in Uganda in eastern Africa named West Nile Virus. West Nile virus is a single stranded RNA virus that lies within the family of flavivrus, which is part of the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex of viruses. It is found in both tropical and temperate regions. It is known to infect vertebrates and certain insects. The most common route in which it infects humans is through the bite of an infected mosquito. West Nile Virus hit the United States the summer of 1999 in New York....   [tags: Disease]
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1288 words
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Presentation on DNA Vaccines - Vaccines • Vaccines are “one of the greatest achievements of modern medicine” • In developed nations, vaccines have almost exterminated polio and smallpox and tightly controlled diseases like hepatitis A and B or typhus • There are three generations of vaccinations • First generation vaccines are either weakened or killed forms of whole organisms • There is a problem with first-gen vaccines: the pathogens can still revert to dangerous forms and cause diseases in immunocompromised vaccine recipients....   [tags: Powerpoint Presentation] 1527 words
(4.4 pages)
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Meningococcal Disease Treatments and Vaccines - Meningococcal Disease Treatments and Vaccines Meningococcal disease is a large concern in the medical field because it is unbiased towards the patients it infects. There has been limited success in trying to eliminate this disease. Antibiotics play a role in helping to treat patients with bacterial meningitis, and steroids have been tested to help reduce risk factors. Prevention has also become a key issue because meningitis can only be spread through direct contact with infected body fluid. The best prevention is to maintain clean hygiene....   [tags: Bacterial Meningitis]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 6 Sources Cited
3064 words
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Edward Jenner and the Discovery of Vaccines - Edward Jenner and the Discovery of Vaccines Edward Jenner (1749-1823) trained in London, under John Hunter, and was an army surgeon for a period of time. After that, he spent his whole career as a country doctor in his home county, Gloucestershire (West of England). His research was based on careful case studies and clinical observation more than a hundred years before scientists could explain what viruses and diseases actually were. His innovative new method was successful to such an extent that by 1840 the British government had banned alternative preventive treatments against smallpox....   [tags: Papers] 764 words
(2.2 pages)
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Vaccinating Children Should Be Mandatory - ... What could possibly be the arguments for not protecting your children, others, and yourself from deadly, yet preventable, diseases. Vaccines are liquid solutions that contain dead or weakened forms of infectious viruses that are injected into the body to produce immunity from disease. A vaccine works by tricking the body’s immune system into creating antibodies that fight an innocuous form of the virus. The antibodies then remain in the body, and if the person encounters the real virus, they are protected against it....   [tags: Vaccines Should Be Required] 1034 words
(3 pages)
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Vibrio cholerae, the Human Immune System, and Vaccines - Vibrio cholerae, the Human Immune System, and Vaccines Cholera remains a drastically severe disease, killing hundreds of people each outbreak. When ingested, it attaches to the mucosal lining of the intestines and disrupts the normal flow of ions so that there is more sodium, chloride, and water in the intestinal lumen than normal and results in massive diarrhea. Cholera has made a global impact and been endemic in almost all parts of the world. Cholera control strongly emphasizes sanitation, clean drinking water, isolation, and careful food preparation....   [tags: Cholera]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 4 Sources Cited
1605 words
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Vaccinations: Know the Risks and Failures - “Vaccinations are causing a major upsurge in childhood diseases, adult maladies, and even deadly ailments such as Gulf War Syndrome and Lou Gehrig’s disease” (Blaylock). Every now and then an individual’s doctor calls telling them about the latest vaccine they should receive. The person immediately schedules a time to come in and get it done. But do they even give a second thought about it. Have they ever thought that maybe they do not need another vaccination. Many people have not taken the time to seriously think about the process of immunization....   [tags: Anti-Vaccination, Vaccines and Autism]
:: 5 Works Cited
1626 words
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A Needed Sacrifice - ... Their findings could one day lead to a human HIV vaccine” (Chang).The researchers would not use animals if they knew the inclusion of animals would not help. The researchers would use other alternatives more if the differences in animals and humans affected the scientists’ studies, but as clarified in the article Animal Research: Right or Wrong. the differences could lead to different in depth studies that later are compared with human related issues. Also, the differences do not affect scientists because animal testing all together helps both humans and animals as well....   [tags: legal issues, vaccines, animal testing]
:: 18 Works Cited
2468 words
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Analysis of Malaria - ... Falciparum transcends across two habitats (the cold-blooded mosquito vector and the warm-blooded human host), it is thought that the production of chaperones by the parasite is survival strategy used in response to stress against temperature and physiological changes (3,6). There is evidence that suggests heat shock proteins help the parasite to adapt leading to drug resistance, and heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) has been viewed as the primary protein involved (3,7). During the development of febrile malaria, body temperature rises to 41°C because of the release of pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor (3,8), and the development of this fever is known to promote the pathogenesis of malaria by enhancing the ability of the parasite-infected erythrocytes to adhere to blood vessels(3,9)....   [tags: Vaccines, Affected Areas, WHO]
:: 15 Works Cited
754 words
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Controversy About Vaccinations Against Infectious Diseases - Vaccination Against Infectious Diseases Vaccines are one of the most controversial topics in modern medicine and will continue to attract more attention in the years ahead. Most new parents dutifully take their babies to their doctor to be vaccinated, at the prescribed times. However, over the last few decades, there have been several scares concerning vaccinations, and the possible side effects of them. Some parents have refused to have their child vaccinated because of some of these scares, and the truth is, they have been blown out of proportion by the press and it can be very confusing for the general public....   [tags: Medicine Papers Vaccines] 1094 words
(3.1 pages)
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Vaccinating against H1N1 - As the flu season continues to draw closer, the fear of contracting the H1N1 virus, more commonly known as the swine flu, persists in spreading throughout the world. The United States Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 2 million people nationwide have already been infected with the H1N1 virus, but families are still skeptical about the new H1N1 vaccine and refuse to take it. I believe the best way to prevent children and adults from the influenza is to receive the H1N1 vaccine....   [tags: Vaccinations, H1N1, USA,] 532 words
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H1N1 and the Regular Seasonal Flu - H1N1 and the Regular Seasonal Flu There is currently a debate going on between the regular flu and the swine flu (H1N1). Both are viruses, but there is a difference between them. In this report, I will be discussing what a virus is, how it is transmitted, how it is proliferated, and what types of symptoms one has if they get the virus. I will also be discussing vaccines, how they are developed, why they are used, what a flu vaccine is in particular, how the early flu vaccine is different from H1N1 vaccine, and why there is a concern about the swine flu verses the regular flu, since swine flu season occurs yearly....   [tags: Compare Contrast, Virus, Flu] 785 words
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HPV Vaccination - According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, 80% of people in America are infected by the Human Papillomavirus, also known as HPV, at some point in their lifetime. That would be as though, 25 out of the 30 students in this classroom have or have had this sexually transmitted disease. Only one group of desks in this class would be safe from its harmful effects. This is an incredibly common, and potentially deadly, virus, which is why we should mandate the HPV vaccine, Gardasil, for all teenage girls entering middle school....   [tags: HPV Cancer, Cervical Cancer] 892 words
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HPV Speech - According to the Journal of the American Medical Association, 80% of people in America are infected by the Human Papillomavirus, also known as HPV, at some point in their lifetime. Compared to this class, 25 out of the 30 students here have had this sexually transmitted disease. Only one of your tables is safe. The rest of you are all at risk. This is an incredibly common, and potentially deadly, virus, which is why we should mandate the HPV vaccine, Gardasil, for all teenage girls entering middle school....   [tags: HPV Cancer, Cervical Cancer] 878 words
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Childhood Vaccinations: A Game of Russian Roulette? - Introduction Parents make sure their children get a proper diet, wear their bicycle helmet, and get enough sleep. Every parent wants to do what is best for their children and protect them from harm. No parent would allow their child to play with a loaded weapon, even with the safety on, and expect the best outcome. It would never happen. But it does. With every vaccine that is given, we are playing Russian roulette with our children’s lives. Childhood vaccinations have replaced common childhood illness as a “rite of passage” for many young children....   [tags: Health Care]
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Lowering Testing Standards in Third World Countries - Lowering Testing Standards in Third World Countries ABSTRACT: Recently, Sidney Wolfe, director of Public Citizen’s Health Research Group (PCHRG), charged the National Institute of Health (NIH) and Center for Disease Control (CDC) with sponsoring fifteen immoral HIV studies in sub-Saharan Africa. The trials are being conducted to determine if certain alternate medical procedures or a short course of treatment with AZT, zidovudine or other drugs prevent some mother-child HIV transmissions. (1) Since the control group receives only placebos rather than AZT, Wolfe claims that the tests give suboptimal treatment that will result in more children contracting HIV and AIDS....   [tags: HIV AIDS Vaccines Papers]
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A Perilous Cure - Throughout history, mankind has encountered multiple obstacles. One of the main roadblocks has been illness. From a simple cold to the bubonic plague, viruses and diseases were once thought uncontrollable and deadly. Scientists have recently found ways to combat such illnesses – vaccines. When administered, the weak virus in a vaccine is easily overwhelmed by a healthy immune system. The human body remembers the virus structure and is capable of fighting the full version. In manufacturing vaccines, it is necessary to prevent bacterial or fungal growth in the event that the vaccine is accidentally contaminated, as might occur with repeated puncture of multi-dose vials (Questions and Answers)....   [tags: Medicine] 1258 words
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Vaccinations Necessary to the Nation’s Youth - Parents must make many decisions about their child, which vary from what brand of diapers to use to at what age to start a college fund. Parents also take responsibility for their child’s health, including deciding whether or not to vaccinate. Immunizations serve as the most efficient way to prevent possible life threatening diseases, including mumps, Hepatitis B, and polio, from affecting children, not only during adolescence, but also throughout their adult lives. Parents need to make the informed decision to vaccinate their children....   [tags: Medical Research, Immunization]
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Understanding Polio - Understanding Polio Polio runs rampant in countries with very unhealthy sewage practices. Luckily, polio can be isolated from sewage, but anytime unclean water is let into a river, stream, lake, or other water body, it can spread into any unknowing person who uses that water to drink. People in the 30's, 40's and 50's were afraid to swim because of that. Polio after being digested, heads for the cells covering the intestines. There are three main strains of Polio. Two of them only produce a low-grade fever, headache, sore and inflamed throat, nausea, and vomiting....   [tags: Informative, Expository] 296 words
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INOCULATION TO DISABILITY AND DEATH - Scientific evidence demonstrates that vaccine inoculation can cause complications including disability and death. What is causing this shift in immune-prophylaxis, from the initial goal of eradicating contagious diseases, to becoming a killer inoculation. Are we still free to defend and decide for our health, or is there a danger of government actions with mass- vaccination mandates. There is a justified alarming concern on vaccines, not only in the population worldwide, but also in the medical personnel....   [tags: Medical Research]
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To vaccinate, or not to vaccinate? - Currently, one cannot explore the news without coming across the topic of the swine flu, scientifically known as H1N1. Swine flu is a respiratory infection derived from the influenza virus. The virus contains genetic materials from human, swine, and avian flu viruses. It was first identified in spring 2009, and since then has spread rapidly across the globe. The infection’s spread has been verified as a global pandemic by the World Health Organization. As soon as the swine flu virus was isolated, scientists quickly developed a swine flu vaccine....   [tags: Disease] 1456 words
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Vaccinations: A Clear Benefit - Vaccinations: A Clear Benefit Vaccination: A Clear Benefit A clear definition of a vaccination is, “the generic term for immunization procedures. Immunization is a procedure whereby living or nonliving materials are introduced into the body…:” (Nosal, 1999) The concept that people who survive an infectious disease do not get the same disease again is the basis for the administering of vaccinations. Vaccines are normally given to healthy individuals for the prevention of diseases....   [tags: essays research papers] 1967 words
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The Anthrax Threat - The Anthrax Threat Today's US military personnel around the world face a new threat: Biological weapons. To protect the US troops against Biological weapons; the Department of Defense implemented a mandatory vaccination program against anthrax. This was justified to counter an increasing threat from hostile countries and possible terrorist groups that now or in the future will likely possess the capability of fielding weaponized anthrax spores as a Biological Weapon. This decision has resulted in court-martials and disciplinary hearings among U.S....   [tags: Papers] 778 words
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The History of Swine Flu and the Current Worldwide Outbreak of this Virus - A long time ago, the world has been greatly hit by the virulent disease of swine flu in 1918, 1976, 1988, 1998, 2007 and now finally in the year of 2009. This flu is also referred to as swine influenza, hog flu, or pig flu. The swine flu that has hit humans has been mainly associated with bonds of the H1N1 virus. In the past, in Mexico, the Midwestern United States, South America, China, Taiwan, Japan and other parts of Eastern Asia have been found tainted with swine flu. Over the very past years this virus has shown its evil face along the entire world....   [tags: health, medical]
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Common Symptoms and Damages of Measles - The Latin name for measles is rubeola. The pathogen which causes the disease is a paramyxovirus, which is one of a group of RNA (ribonucleic acid) viruses. Measles is a respiratory disease caused by a virus, and also comes out in a rash. The virus enters the body via the respiratory system, and grows in the cells at the back of the throat and in the cells that line the lungs, from there it then enters the blood stream and circulates the body. Common Symptoms Usually a person doesn’t start to get symptoms of measles until they have been infected with the virus for 7-11 days....   [tags: measles, medical, ] 581 words
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I Think Everyone Should Get Vaccinated Against H1N1 Influenza - H1N1 is a global flu pandemic that is currently all around the world. The Swine Flu spread through Mexico in April, 2009, and by June 11th, the World Health Organization raised the alert level to a full-blown pandemic across the globe. The virus spread rapidly throughout the world. Luckily, the government of Canada, and of other nations, has offered an immunization flu shot against this pandemic that is available to some citizens at the present time. In “Swine Flu Vaccine: What Is Fair?,” from the journal Hastings Center Report in 2009, Lawrence O....   [tags: H1N1, vaccinations,] 853 words
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Flu Season - Each year the winter seasons brings with it cold, snow, holidays, and to a lucky few a break from work or school. To many, however, winter brings the dreaded Influenza virus, a virus which, if left to it’s own devices, can bring death, especially to the young, the old, and the infirm. This year winter also brought with it a shortage of the Influenza vaccine, which was due to a contamination of one manufacturer’s supply. (Flaherty A02) The resulting decrease in supply caused a dramatic increase in the price demanded by suppliers (and the price paid by consumers)....   [tags: essays research papers] 666 words
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Cervical Cancer - HPV Vaccination Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancerous death, in women, since 1950. Approximately 200,000 cervical cancer patients die each year in developing countries. Strains like HPV 16 and 18 cause about 70% of cervical cancer in women– one of the top causes of death in the world (WebMD, 2010, p.1). In the Unites States, about 10,000 women acquire the disease and 3,700 die annually Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is directly associated as a cause of cervical cancer. This virus affects the skin and genital area and, in some cases, it can also infect the throat and mouth....   [tags: Health, Diseases, Human Papilloma Virus] 1801 words
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Flawed Protection - Having kids vaccinated is a decision every parent has to make shortly after their children are born. Most parents are led to believe there is no question about the safety of these vaccines. However there are few parents that are determined these vaccines are one of the prime factors in the cause of autism. The United States is in the midst of a tragic epidemic of autism. An analysis of the US Department of Education data from 1992-1993 in comparison to 2000-2001 indicates that there has been an average increase of 644% among all US children....   [tags: Medical Research]
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The Global Fund - The threaded discussions have demonstrated that communicable diseases are the leading causes of illness, deaths, and disability in the African continent. In this regard, the economic costs in terms of prevention, treatment, and loss of productivity are undeniably enormous. Most, if not all of the human and financial resources allocated to Africa have focused on disease-specific intervention programs, such as prevention or treatment of malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. Yellow fever, like malaria, is transmitted by mosquitoes and share similar symptoms....   [tags: Health, Diseases, HIV/AIDS] 833 words
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A Comprehensive Study of Jonas Salk - A remembrance in La Jolla, California, presents, “Hope lies in dreams, in imagination, and in the courage of those who dare to make dreams into reality.” The memorial commemorates the great virologist Jonas Salk (Salk.edu). Although many recognize Salk as the man who effectuated the eradication of polio, he also contributed to a vast amount of medical research. A comprehensive study of Jonas Salk includes his young life, early career, work with poliomyelitis, and later career and life. Daniel and Dora Press Salk became the parents of Jonas Salk on October 28, 1914....   [tags: Biography] 1080 words
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The Importance of Childhood Vaccination - Since the introduction of vaccinations, medical science has managed to all but eliminate many formerly fatal and debilitating childhood illnesses in countries where the immunization of children is nearly universal. Diseases such as measles, mumps, diphtheria, rubella and polio have been relegated to a marginal status in developed countries with active immunization campaigns; smallpox is actually considered to have been completely eliminated from the earth, without a single case having been reported since roughly 1979 (“Childhood”)....   [tags: Medicine Vaccinations]
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Diptheria - Diphtheria Introduction Diphtheria is a bacterial disease caused by the pathogen Corynebacterium diphtheriae. Diphtheria is a respiratory disease and can be a skin infection, but this is less common. The Corynebacterium diphtheriae multiply on the lining of the throat, nose or larynx, from here they divide and excrete a poisonous toxin. The bacteria and toxin destroy the lining of the throat, and a thick coating is formed and then the patient will develop serious inflammation of the throat. The coating in the throat can become detached and obstruct airways which makes breathing very difficult and can cause asphyxiation....   [tags: Disease] 579 words
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Anthrax - Anthrax Vaccine: Safe and Effective, or Not. Intro: The Anthrax vaccine is a mandatory shot for military; while some people are willing to take the shot to save their lives, others believe if they take it, it will ruin theirs. I. The Anthrax Disease A. Anthrax is a bacterial infection caused by Bacillus Anthracis. 1. It primarily affects livestock, but can occasionally spread humans. a. The infection can be treated, but is almost always fatal. 2. The bacterium produces spores that lay dormant for years in soil and on animal products....   [tags: essays research papers] 881 words
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Polio - Poliomyelitis, infectious virus disease of the central nervous system, sometimes resulting in paralysis. The greatest incidence of the disease, also known as infantile paralysis, is in children between the ages of five and ten years. The disease was described in 1840 by the German orthopedist Jacob von Heine. In its clinical form it is more prevalent in temperate zones. Symptoms The virus usually enters the body through the alimentary tract and spreads along nerve cells to affect various parts of the central nervous system....   [tags: essays research papers] 430 words
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Mumps Virus - Mumps Virus Mumps is a paramyxovirus that is closely related to the parainfluenza virus. Its symptoms were first described in the 5th century BC, and it was a very common childhood affliction until the last several decades. It was identified as a virus in 1934, and an effective vaccine was developed in 1967. Mumps is acquired by aerosol, necessitating close human interaction for spread. Human beings are the only known reservoir for mumps virus, and there is only one serotype. Multiplication The virus is primarily spherical shaped and roughly 200nm in size, surrounded by a host-cell derived membrane....   [tags: ] 715 words
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Aids and its History - For the fast several years an AIDS vaccine has been the key focus in AIDS research. While the government sees the vaccine as a termination to the disease, but a portion of the public along with many renowned scientists from around the world would argue against a vaccine. The United Nations and the US military have threatened to administer a mandatory vaccine to children at the age of 12 and all military employees. Reports predict a massive resistance to a mandatory AIDS vaccine in the US. (www.newsmax.shtml) The Committtee to Protect Medical Freedom warned that the vaccine would infact put more people at risk of contracting the deadly disease....   [tags: essays research papers] 1195 words
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Pre-existing Knowledge - ‘It is more important to discover new ways of thinking about what is already known than to discover new data or facts’. To what extent would you agree with this claim. Albert Einstein said, “We shall require a substantially new manner of thinking if mankind is to survive.” This new manner of thinking should be based on pre-existing knowledge. This pre-existing knowledge is necessary because it is the catalyst that pushes the human race forward, making us want to discover more. Trying to discover completely new knowledge would not yield the same results....   [tags: Scientific Research]
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Skipping Childhood Vaccination Is Not Neglect - Skipping Childhood Vaccination Is Not Neglect According to The Guardian, everyday approximately 11,000 babies are born in the United States of America. From the time they are born, they are required to be immunized. In the first few hours of life, these newborns receive the Hepatitis B vaccine. There are parents however who are skeptical about the potential side effects of all the vaccines. They think that immunizations are going to harm their children by causing them to develop neurological deficits....   [tags: persuasive text] 1247 words
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Fear No Evil, Fear No Shot: Vaccinating Children Should Be Considered Safe - Illnesses such as pertussis, meningitis, and the flu are not extinct, nor are they easily treated if contracted, particularly by children. However, it seems that some parents of small children will not consent to have their children vaccinated against these and other life-threatening illnesses because they are convinced that some of these vaccinations cause SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome), autism, or have other serious side effects. Although many studies have been conducted, and the majority have found no cause for alarm, many parents are still skeptical....   [tags: Medical Research]
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Meningitis - In nineteenth century Geneva, a family came down with a strange disease— one that had never previously been diagnosed. In a short time, many people in their town were infected and thirty-three people were left dead. This strange disease was later determined to be meningitis. In 1806, the United States saw its first outbreak of meningitis in Massachusetts. It was not until 1887, however, that Professor Anton Weichselbaum was able to determine a cause of meningitis: a bacterium called Neisseria meningitides....   [tags: Health, Diseases] 1069 words
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It is Advisable that Everyone Should Get Vaccinated Against H1N1 Influenza - H1N1 Influenza (“Swine Flu”) is a flu pandemic that has recently spread all around the world. The Swine Flu began its massive spread through Mexico in April (2009) and by June, the World Health Organization raised the alert level to a full-blown pandemic across the globe. The virus has spread rapidly throughout the world. Luckily, the governments around the globe have offered an immunization flu shot against this pandemic that is available to some citizens at this present time. In Lawrence Gostin's “Swine Flu Vaccine: What Is Fair?” (2009), he explains his doubts for the Swine Flu vaccination by emphasizing how rich countries have a large advantage over poor countries in receiving the vaccine, how high authorities are hardly helping the poor countries with their struggle to afford vaccinations, and what groups of people are considered the “priority groups” throughout America....   [tags: H1N1, Swine flu, vaccinations, ] 1087 words
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Importance of Immunizations - My Audience will know the Importance of Immunizations I. INTRODUCTION The Importance of Vaccine Preventable Diseases A. ATTENTION GETTER “Fact Texas is ranked last in Immunization coverage rates among the 50 states” B. ESTABLISH THEME Un immunized kids are starting to become a risk factor in our Texas school, to a point where they are starting to exclude students from school activities. C. CREDIBILITY I speak from first hand knowledge, not only am I faced with these problems on a day to day basis, my daughter was diagnosed with pertussis from an un immunized contact person, so I know the importance of immunizations....   [tags: essays research papers] 494 words
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