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Your search returned over 400 essays for "urbanization"
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The Implications of Rapid Urbanization - Urbanization is the process of human migration from rural areas to towns and cities, thus rapid urbanization means that the rate at which the migration from rural to urban takes place is hurried that a country has no time to plan for their existence at the cities. The situation differs from country to country as the number of cities and rural areas in the countries are different. Another possible reason for the difference is the development nature of the countries; some countries are developed, others are developing while others are considered least developed....   [tags: Urbanization]
:: 11 Works Cited
1669 words
(4.8 pages)
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Problems Due To Urbanization - Recently, as developed countries, many cities have become more suitable to live in with all facilities that people need in favor of a comfortable live style. Therefore, many people migrate from rural areas to urban areas in a process so called urbanization (Wikipedia, 2009). Urbanization has become one of the most important issues facing both people live and governments in most countries. An important term that has been suggested as a policy to solve the problems associated with urbanization is sustainable development....   [tags: Urbanization]
:: 8 Works Cited
1072 words
(3.1 pages)
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Geography: The Urbanization of Bangkok - ... The Chinese New Year (January to February) and the Vegetarian Festival (September to October) is celebrated widely by the Chinese community. 5th December and 12th August mark Thailand's national Father's Day and national Mother's Day because it is the King's and Queen's birthdays. These national holidays are celebrated with royal audiences and public gatherings, the King or Queen gives a speech. King Chulalongkorn Memorial Day (23rd October) is where wreaths are laid at King Chulalongkorn's statue in the Royal Plaza....   [tags: tourism, population, urbanization]
:: 6 Works Cited
1652 words
(4.7 pages)
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The Effects of Urbanization - ... It is important that humans make sure that these everyday resources are always kept at obtainable level for all and be safe for use (Watts, 2010) (Joshi, Kumar, Nazareth, & Ravindranath, 2007). In doing so, it means that these resources are will be used in a sensible manner that ensures that not much is wasted unnecessarily (Watts, 2010). Importance of Sustainability As sustainability is a concept of the preserving and conserving, more good can come out of it then bad. With it being introduced into society brings a more general way of thinking and more community cohesion and that will speed up the process in term of the preserving of the environment....   [tags: population growth, agriculture]
:: 15 Works Cited
1763 words
(5 pages)
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The Urbanization of Poverty - The majority of poor people are those who experience chronic -- and even multigenerational -- poverty (Iceland, 2003). In the United States many of the chronically poor live in urban environments. These environments, characterized by high concentrations of poor high concentrations of people of color and concentrated disadvantage, have been characterized as areas of moral as well as economic failure. In this paper, I will contend that conditions in these regions serve to hold individuals in poverty and to perpetuate multigenerational poverty through diminished human capital and reduced social capital....   [tags: Urban Enclaves of Poverty]
:: 17 Works Cited
2451 words
(7 pages)
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Urbanization in Africa - Urbanization is the movement from a rural society to an urban society, and involves a growth in the number of people in urban areas. Urban growth is increasing in both the developed but mostly in the developing countries. Urbanization is associated with the problems of unemployment, poverty, bad health, poor cleanliness, urban slums environmental deprivation. This causes a very big problem for these developing countries and who are some of poorest countries. Africa urbanization is not as big as most developing countries but is on the rise for it outbursts in city growth lately....   [tags: Development, Urban Trend] 1087 words
(3.1 pages)
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Urbanization and Crime - With a 10% increase in crime rate since 2009, budding city St. John’s (Newfoundland and Labrador) soared 19.2% above the national average and in 2010 placed as seventh in Canada’s overall crime rated cities (Brennan, 2011). The level of crime relative to suburban or rural areas has recently become an accepted theory in criminology. Regardless of the data source used, crime statistics consistently reflect that urban crime rates are substantially greater than crime rates in non-urban areas. More so, population size has been shown to be an important predictor of crime rates across cities, not only in Canada, but all over the world....   [tags: Social Studies]
:: 3 Works Cited
1501 words
(4.3 pages)
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Urbanization in Jamaica - I. Introduction Often misconstrued as an idealistic destination, Jamaica is a very stratified entity when it comes to the have and have not’s. The institution of slavery has shaped the physical landform of the country and inadvertently created fragmented and informal communities. This is further reiterated by the continuous division of garrisons “shantytowns” and gated communities prevalent within the urban fabric. The structural readjustment of the government in efforts to alleviate debt has reinforced the ideology of privatization and splintered urbanism....   [tags: haves, have nots, garrisons, shantytowns]
:: 4 Works Cited
2964 words
(8.5 pages)
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The Relationship Between Urbanization and Industrialization - The industrial Revolution, starting in late 18th century, had a significant urbanizing effect. Industrialization is the basic driving force of urbanization and urbanization, cities, are the important land for industrialization. Industrialization and urbanization are just like brothers that grow and develop together and developed each other (Lexicon Universal Encyclopedia, 1997). Industrialization is the initiator of urbanization and urbanization is the inevitable result of industrialization. The inventions of railroad tracks, automobiles, telephones, airplanes and electricity are a part of industrialization and the growth of cities, urbanization, during the late 1800s and early 1900s....   [tags: american history, industrial revolution]
:: 1 Works Cited
899 words
(2.6 pages)
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The White Tiger: Challenges of Urbanization - Recent years have witnessed a large number of Indian English fiction writers who have stunned the literary world with their works. The topics dealt with are contemporary and populist and the English is functional, communicative and unpretentious. Novels have always served as a guide, a beacon in a conflicting, chaotic world and continue to do so. A careful study of Indian English fiction writers show that there are two kinds of writers who contribute to the genre of novels: The first group of writers include those who are global Indians, the diasporic writers, who are Indians by birth but have lived abroad, so they see Indian problems and reality objectively....   [tags: Indian English fiction writers, Aravind Adiga]
:: 6 Works Cited
3310 words
(9.5 pages)
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Urbanization Problems and Sustainable Development - Cities all over the world are developing. As war ended in 1942, a significant number of people move to the city because they want to improve life. This urbanization process is causing a number of problems and should be met by sustainable development policies. In the beginning, it is important to know the definition of sustainable development. There are some definitions for sustainable development, but simply they say that sustainable development is a development which using resources now and preserving them for future generations (Adams, 1999, p.137)....   [tags: Social Issues]
:: 6 Works Cited
1366 words
(3.9 pages)
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Urbanization in the Kurdistan Region - Introduction Urbanization: The process by which more and more people leave the countryside to live in cities (Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary). Sustainable development: The ability of an activity or development to continue in the long term without undermining that part of the environment which sustains it (Scottish Natural Heritage, 1993). The process of urbanization and the population growth across the world has been increasing over the last 40 years, and it is expected to happen in the developing countries' urban areas....   [tags: Sustainable Development] 2284 words
(6.5 pages)
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Urbanization & Applied Anthropology - Urbanization is the process of life for many and the desired way of life for many others. Human beings both inhabit urban and rural areas today all over the world. Many people may be disappointed with the development of an increasing number of urban areas. Many peoples once rural areas are now swallowed up directly as cities sprawl outward. The effects of urbanization both positive and negative get examined in the following paragraphs. In addition, who is most effected by urbanization and who plays a role in preventing and/or properly planning development will also be revealed....   [tags: Anthropology ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1818 words
(5.2 pages)
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Sustainable development, a new way of urbanization - Introduction Urbanization, which is becoming a buzzword during the last few decades, is enlarging at a booming speed. It is predicted that 93 percents urban growth will occur to the year 2020, in the developing world (Elliot J.A, 1999). Generally speaking, more than half of the people around the world have been moved to cities, which led to a series of “matters” connected with people’s life that changed in a dramatical way. In this period, sustainable development, another buzzword during the past few years, came into people’s view and gradually became the mainstream of society development....   [tags: Electricity Consumption, Desertification]
:: 13 Works Cited
1257 words
(3.6 pages)
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Population Growth: The Problems Created By Urbanization - ... “In the slum of Golibar, a room of about 15 square meters is home to a family of 8 people. Dewa Ramchandra Bhalerao, their eldest son has been fighting tuberculosis for four years and openly discusses his fear of infecting others in such a congested space” (Nunan). In slums, the lack of sanitation that worries many surrounds the access people have to proper bathrooms and cleaning products, of which many developed nations take for granted. Horrifying amounts of litter cover the city of Mumbai, especially in slums, creating an unhygienic environment in people’s personal living space....   [tags: poverty, poor living, overpopulation]
:: 7 Works Cited
1279 words
(3.7 pages)
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Impacts Of Urbanization - Many villagers and small town dwellers want a living in big cities. With some expectations, they make a movement from villages to big cities. This migration from rural areas to big cities is called urbanization. There are two kinds of factors why rural people seek for urban life. The first one is urban pull factor. They dream for higher wages, better housing and utilities, better school and hospital, more jobs opportunity, and more experience that they can get it all from a living in big cities as they think....   [tags: essays research papers] 396 words
(1.1 pages)
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Communities and Urbanization - COMMUNITIES & URBANIZATION Introduction George Murdock once said that a community is one of the two truly universal units of society organization, the other one being family (Schaefer, 461). We are all part of a community, and in many cases, we are a part of multiple ones. In chapter 20 of our textbook, we are looking at communities and urbanization. It discusses urbanization and how communities originate. It also looks at the different types of communities....   [tags: essays research papers] 2594 words
(7.4 pages)
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Causes and Effects of Poverty and Urbanisation on a Global Community - ... In developing countries like Mongolia, Bangladesh, Zimbabwe etc., it is awfully crucial for lower income groups to sustain decent standards of life. Urban centres are known for high rates of crime. Pick pocketing, murder, theft; cheating, rape etc. are common in urban centres. Urban centres are categorised by vastly secondary relations. The view of community life, neighbourhood has practically vanished in cities. Urban life can be tiresome. This may include an antagonistic psychological result on individuals....   [tags: urbanisation, extreme poverty, beijing]
:: 7 Works Cited
1118 words
(3.2 pages)
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Sustainable Development Policies Can Reduce Urbanization Problems - Cities all over the world are developing. This urbanization process is causing a number of problems and can be met by sustainable development policies. In the beginning, it is important to know what is the reason for urbanization. Most people move to the city because they want to get a better life. Another important term is a sustainable development. There are some definitions for sustainable development, but simply they say that sustainable development is a development which using resources now and preserving them for future generations (Adams, 1999, p.137)....   [tags: Sustainable Development Essays] 1304 words
(3.7 pages)
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urbanization in third world countries - Urbanization and its effect on third world living conditions Urbanization is the spreading of cities into less populated agricultural areas. Most people would not think that this is necessarily a problem. They would say that it is good that the “developing countries” were becoming more developed. With urbanization comes factories and more jobs, so the people can make more money and be happier. Right. The problem is that these people must sacrifice their traditional lifestyles, for this new “Urbanism”(the way of life, attitudes, values, and patterns of behavior fostered by urban settings Knox 234)....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 1 Sources Cited
1296 words
(3.7 pages)
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Urbanization & Habitat Loss in the Fraser Valley as a Threat to Biodiversity - We don’t often stop to consider the impact that simply living our human lives has on the other species that once called our neighbourhoods their home. The Fraser Valley, “one of the most important and complex ecosystems in the country” (Thom, p. 171), has been dramatically altered to make a more convenient landscape for housing and farming. In this process, critical habitat has been destroyed and many species that were once abundant have disappeared from our area (Cuthbert p. 24). Urbanization is ongoing and is thought to be the most significant threat to the incredible biodiversity found throughout British Columbia, and particularly the population-dense Lower Mainland (Harding, p....   [tags: Flora&Fauna, Salmon Lifecycle]
:: 12 Works Cited
1867 words
(5.3 pages)
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Problems Generated by Industralization and Urbanization in Ontario Province - ... [4] c) Department of the Environment Act: this act describes that the minister of environment governs the department and power of the minister related to air, water, soil quality and also the responsibility to preserve the natural environment. Also minister have to submit an annual report which shows departmental operations for that fiscal year on January 31 in the parliament. [5] There are various regulations. The ideal condition should be to prevent the contaminated water to enter into the water body....   [tags: canda, water pollution, drinking water]
:: 6 Works Cited
1067 words
(3 pages)
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Urbanization and Human Influence - Urbanization and Human Influence It is estimated that by the year 2000, half the world population will live in urban environments (Porter and Brown, 1996). The US Bureau of the Census defines an area as being urbanized if a central city and its closely settled surrounding territory are of a certain size with 50,000 people and density of at least 1,000 people per square mile (Knox, 1994). A component of the definition denotes that human influence is a main aspect of urbanized areas in the process of urbanization....   [tags: Environmental Geology Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
841 words
(2.4 pages)
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Consensus vs. Urbanization - Consensus vs. Urbanization The process of modernization contains many elements, which work together in many ways. The two elements that I will be discussing are consensus and urbanization. Consensus is when a group or groups of people come to an agreement with each other. Urbanization is the development of cities. Consensus makes the social forces stronger. Social forces strengthen with higher levels of consensus because more people are agreeing with each other. The social forces can now begin to agree on the things they want and most likely get the things they want....   [tags: Papers] 761 words
(2.2 pages)
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Sub-urbanization in America - Sub-urbanization in America AHousing is an outward expression of the inner human nature; no society can be understood apart from the residences of its members.@ That is a quote from the suburban historian Kenneth T. Jackson, from his magnificent piece on suburbanization Crabgrass Frontier. Suburbanization has been probably the most significant factor of change in U.S. cities over the last 50 years, and began 150 years ago. It represents Aa reliance upon the private automobile, upward mobility, the separation of the family into nuclear units, the widening division between work and leisure, and a tendency toward racial and economic exclusiveness.@ Overall it may represent the change in att...   [tags: Papers] 3293 words
(9.4 pages)
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To What Extent Can the Problems of Urbanization be Met by a Policy of Sustainable Development - Introduction With the development of urbanization, an increasing number of social problems have emerged. These problems will decelerate the urban development, however, there are many ways in which sustainable development can reduce the impact of these urbanization problems. “Sustainable development seeks to improve the quality of human life without undermining the quality of our natural environment” (Adams, W.M. 1999). Actually, sustainable development can partly solve the urbanization problems, for it can reduce the impact of the problems such as traffic jam, housing shortage and severe pollution, but it is difficult to completely solve these problems in a short time....   [tags: Urban Population, Pollution]
:: 6 Works Cited
1338 words
(3.8 pages)
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Why Does Urbanization Occur? - Urbanisation is the process which has led to an increasing proportion of a country's population living within urban areas. It is impossible to say exactly when the process began, but in Britain it was around the time of the industrial revolution. Many people moved from rural to urban areas in search of regular employment. The MEDC's around the world are all urbanised now, with annual growth rates of urbanisation still increasing, but sustainably. LEDC's however are still rapidly urbanising. In this essay I am going to look at all the factors that cause urbanisation and evaluate why it is occurring....   [tags: World Cultures] 808 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Important of Cities in Roman Provinces - Urbanization is defined as the “act of making urban in nature or character (Urbanization). An understanding of urbanization is central to understanding the components behind the Roman rule of Italy, and the process of bringing together different cultures. The operations, particularly of the elite, of the Roman society are essential in the understanding of urbanization as well. Cities then were not what they are today, in regards to economic assemblies. The Roman cities were as much an arena for social and political interaction, as they were for economic exchange....   [tags: Urbanization, Roman History]
:: 3 Works Cited
1172 words
(3.3 pages)
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Systematic Learning for Sustainability Science - Systematic Learning for Sustainability Science: A Framework for Practice I. Introduction The urgency of global problems including growing income inequality, climate change, threats to water security, loss of species and the intensification of urbanization suggest that the aspirations for sustainable development that were laid out in the late 1980s and early 1990s have largely not been met (Röckstrom et al. 2009; Gross, 2012). Failures in conventional science to address these pressing problems and better serve society have led to calls for practicing a different kind of science (Lubchenko, 1998; Gallopin et al....   [tags: urbanization, climate change, ]
:: 27 Works Cited
1976 words
(5.6 pages)
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Food Security in the Developed and the Developing World - In 2020, a massive problem known as food shortage will show up, this will in turn affect food security (Metro, 2011). Food security defined as “Everybody having a sufficient access to food for a healthy diet and efficiently not having anxiety about where their next meal is coming from.” (Global Food Security A, ND). Over the last decade, food crisis has become a real issue facing the world. In fact, world population is expected to rise by 15% by 2050(Global Food Security A, ND). This will negatively affect food security....   [tags: Urbanization]
:: 20 Works Cited
1492 words
(4.3 pages)
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New Urbanism: A Step Forward - After the end of the Second World War American cities saw the development of suburban communities. These large planned communities moved a large number of people from the dense urban areas and spread them out on the outskirts of that same city. As the people moved away from the city the business followed as well. The distances that these communities are from the city is dependent on how long people are willing to travel for and by how efficiently an automobile can move individuals from one place to another....   [tags: Urbanization]
:: 10 Works Cited
2096 words
(6 pages)
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The First Industrial Revolution - Part A. The two most significant social consequences of the First Industrial Revolution (c. 1780-1850) are urbanization and child labor. Because people moved from rural areas into cities, the living conditions changed for the worse and with the invention of the steam-operated power loom in 1785, children were able to operate this simple machine and produce textiles for the exploding population ("Begins," n.d.). The Industrial Revolution began as the development of iron making and the use of refined coal triggered the invention of machine-based manufacturing of textiles ("Industrial Revolution," n.d.)....   [tags: Urbanization, Child Labor]
:: 5 Works Cited
877 words
(2.5 pages)
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Christians and Environmental Stewardship - Christians, the world over, have been given the important task of stewardship of God’s creation. The problem is, Christians and non-Christians alike have become so driven to make money that concern for the earth and it’s well-being have fallen by the wayside. As Rich Deem states, “As Christians, we should be doing everything Jesus commanded, including taking care of our families and all the resources He has given to us.” (Deem, 2009) This phenomenon has been going on since the Industrial Revolution....   [tags: Resource Depletion, Urbanization]
:: 2 Works Cited
848 words
(2.4 pages)
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Urban Planning - In a contemporary era the ideal project goes from the design of a spoon to a city. The indissoluble link between every component of the city and the city itself it is now clear and studied. You cannot add another actor to a play without changing the plot. All the elements are mingled to each other as the people are mingled to them. The attention of people needs and habits has to mould the each project of every scale. The interesting difference between a limited architectural project and one in an urban scale is the triple interaction between the architect, the client and the multiple users....   [tags: Architecture, urbanization]
:: 12 Works Cited
2452 words
(7 pages)
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Urban City Stereotypes - Stereotypes of urban cities commonly reflect the portrayal of minorities which they are seen as poor and criminals in comparison to the middle and upper Caucasian class. Such stereotypes are an effect of environmental racism. However, to divert from the spread of negative and racist stereotypes, the local government must reflect a better city. In this paper, I am going to explain the benefits of new regionalism in relation to urban cities and minorities. Having influence from Manuel Pastor and Myron Orfield, minorities need attention from their local government to better their lives....   [tags: Urbanization] 1905 words
(5.4 pages)
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American Urbanization - With the population of America growing exponentially during the 19th century, migration from the country to the city became increasingly popular. As more and more people called the city their “home”, a Pandora’s Box of problems arose. Everything from overcrowded housing to unsanitary living conditions plagued the cities with new diseases during this time. To warn the people of these problems, author’s such as Washington Irving, Walt Whitman and Edgar Allen Poe helped make Americans more conscious about moving to the city....   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 1178 words
(3.4 pages)
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Mesopotamia Urbanization - In ancient times, Mesopotamia was known as the “Land between rivers”. The two main rivers that ran parallel to each other in Mesopotamia were called the Tigris and Euphrates Rivers. The Tigris River was the more unpredictable river to the East of the Euphrates River and the second largest river in the region. The Euphrates River is the larger of the two rivers and is located to the West of the Tigris river. Both rivers flowed from Eastern Turkey all the way to the Persian Gulf (Tigris-Euphrates river system) .The two rivers provided everything the earliest civilizations needed in order to survive....   [tags: World Civilization ]
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1390 words
(4 pages)
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Urbanization-Subdivisions and Suburbs - ... One being able to provide a large living space and accumulate material wealth became engrained in the American Dream. Many realized that the suburbs and living in planned sub divisions of land was an affordable option led to the growth of suburbia throughout the late 20th century. These same desires are what allows the suburbs to flourish. The US Census Bureau published in 2002 “The Demographic Trends of the 20th Century.” In the 20th century, the American population grew from 76 million to 281 million, with 80% of the 281 million living in Urban areas....   [tags: modern suburbs, communities]
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919 words
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How is Sprawl Related to Landscape Change in Cities? - How is Sprawl Related to Landscape Change in Cities. Over the past 20 years the 100 largest US urbanized areas have sprawled an additional 14,545 square miles according to the US Bureau of Census on Urbanized Areas. That was more than 9 million acres of natural habitats, farmland and other rural space that were covered over by asphalt, buildings and housing of suburbia. A major controversy in the efforts to halt the rural land loss is whether land-use and consumption decisions are the primary engines of urban sprawl, or whether it is the nation’s growing population boom that is providing the driving expansion....   [tags: Urbanization Sprawl Urban Essays]
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3015 words
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Urbanisation in India - INTRODUCTION Urbanisation refers to peoples changing attitude towards social life and modernization. It is a process by which there is an increase in proportion of people living in urban area, leading to transformation of land for residential, commercial, and industrial purposes. The basic reason for increasing urbanisation is increase in the number of people moving into cities, for jobs, higher education, and better future prospective and for much higher quality of life. It also allows an easy flow of information, more technological development....   [tags: social life, modernization]
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1931 words
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Industrial Revolution - ... Women and children were often used to work in these industries, leaving very little time for education or family life. The machines were often dangerous to operate and it was common for workers to sustain injuries or death. Ultimately, workers had little rights and in order to keep their jobs had to comply with all the requests of their employers or risk loosing their jobs. Housing was also a concern for those who migrated into the urban as there were more supplied. Property owners could take advantage of the demand for living space....   [tags: urbanization, working class]
:: 5 Works Cited
1333 words
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The Comparisons Between Two Innovative Urbanizations; Mesoamerica and Sumer - Sumer and Mesoamerica are primitive urbanizations that have independently developed in their religion, architecture, government, ect. and it makes each one unique. From the Tigris and Euphrates River in 3500 B.C.E., the place of Sumer had begun and has developed to what we know today as Iraq. Also, the place of Mexico, which begun along the Gulf Coast of Mexico in 3000 B.C.E. Both of these primary urbanizations are important to the world around us because it explains why and how the places interact the way they do now, in the present....   [tags: World History]
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1577 words
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Beautiful Ravenswood - Beautiful Ravenswood Enabling roads Grand River Ave. retraces one of the seven or eight significant Indian trials that led to De’troit as the French called it, the city on the straits. It travels ZZZ miles from the City center through the Northwestern suburbs towards Brighton, Howell and ultimately parallels the Grand River before it flows through Michigan’s state Capital of Lansing. By the 1840’s The Old Grand River Indian trail was but a muddy, mucky pair of ruts that was often impassable for months out of the year....   [tags: Urbanization] 1145 words
(3.3 pages)
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Modern Metropolis - Changes shape life, sometimes they make it better, and sometimes they just let it be more intense. People definitely need a good dose of courage to change, especially when an innovation modifies permanently their lives. However, nowadays one can profit by many opportunities in every field, and this, perhaps, make changes inevitable. As an example for that, people can choose between a vast panorama of places where they would like to live and relocate their lives. According to Penelope Trunk’s experience, “Three years ago, I made a decision to move from New York City to Madison, WI based purely on research....   [tags: Urbanization]
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2310 words
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Mesoamerica and Complex societies - which theory played the biggest part in transformation. Why did it occur in Mesoamerica. Mesoamerica went through a radical transformation since the adaptation of agriculture from their hunter-gather societies into reformed Mayan city states under the control of political hierarchies. The authenticities of these leaders was determined by surplus of goods, particularly maize which was a significant part of their culture and religious connections to the Mayan gods, goddesses and deities. This transformation initiated from Pre-Olmec Period to the Late Classic Maya Period....   [tags: Transformation, Theories, Urbanization] 790 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Importance Urbanisation in India - INTRODUCTION Urbanisation refers to peoples changing attitude towards social life and modernization. It is a process by which there is an increase in proportion of people living in urban area, leading to transformation of land for residential, commercial, and industrial purposes. The basic reason for increasing urbanisation is increase in the number of people moving into cities, for jobs, higher education, and better future prospective and for much higher quality of life. Urbanization allows for easier flow of information, more resistance to anti-progressive forces like nobles or religious officials, and more technological evolution....   [tags: social life, modernization]
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2038 words
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Urban Population, Megacities, and Motivation - Urban Population, Megacities, and Motivation The social phenomenon of urbanization and emergence of megacities in the world’s inhabitation pattern is proved to be an effect that co-exists with human. The biggest launch of the early centuries was caused by the Industrial Revolution and in the latest years, Globalization, established a new basis to the issue. It has been observed to have had a most rapid growing rate in the 20th century due to mainly internal migration of native people from rural areas to cities, that in combination with the global growing birth rate and technology revolution has brought this effect to the proscenium of more economically developed countries and developing cou...   [tags: Urbanization Housing Big Cities Economy Essays] 805 words
(2.3 pages)
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What gave rise to urbanisation in the mediterranean - “What gave rise to urbanisation in the Mediterranean region?” What is urbanisation. To ‘urbanise’ is to ‘make (a rural area) more industrialized and urban’ , urban meaning ‘of or living in a city or town’ . Marja C.V. Vink argues that “The word urbanization was used for the first time in Spain a little more than one hundred years ago” to show the “quantitative and qualitative growth if cities” . The degree of urbanisation is quite different when comparing towns or cities of antiquity to the modern understanding of an urban centre; however, essentially it is the same process....   [tags: essays research papers] 2334 words
(6.7 pages)
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Water Is Irreplaceable - ... In the bathroom, flushing the toilet uses the most water. The next highest consumption activity is showers and baths. Faucets deliver on average about two gallons of water per minute. People should drink around eight-8 ounce glasses of water per day (USGS). Importing water uses substantial energy resources (19 percent of state electricity, 32 percent of state natural gas, etc.). The importing practice also puts stress on the Colorado River (Coastkeeper). San Diego needs to both reduce its usage and find new ways to increase the supply of water....   [tags: Water, urbanization, crisis]
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2474 words
(7.1 pages)
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Tearing Down a City to Build a Shopping Mall - Tearing Down a City to Build a Shopping Mall I exited US Highway 101 South at Madonna Road, squinting into the sun through the windshield of a friends borrowed truck. As I neared the Central Coast Plaza that includes Staples, Bed Bath & Beyond and other retailers, I wondered what was to become of the Dalidio farmland, just south of the shopping center. 130acres of farmland sit just ten yards from the center, separated only by the newly paved Dalidio Road. I thought about how neat it is that we can have agriculture in such close proximity to large scale retail and both can prosper....   [tags: Urbanization Argumentative Papers]
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1606 words
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The High Price of Urban Sprawl - Urban sprawl is a social pattern describing the way cities continue to grow outward uncontrollably. People who do not want to live in an urban atmosphere often seek refuge in suburban areas that have access to metropolitan areas. As more people follow this trend the suburban areas slowly become developed and new areas must be sought for people to inhabit. This leaves some city workers commuting in trains, cars, or even buses for hours. Urban sprawl is not the luxury that it seems to be but actually a social pattern with a great deal of costs....   [tags: Urbanization Urban Essays]
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Keep San Luis Obispo Unique - Keep San Luis Obispo Unique When I began looking at colleges two years ago, I was attracted to Cal Poly in large part due to San Luis Obispo’s unique small town charm. The downtown area boasts distinctive shops and restaurants, a treat for any visitor. This is coupled with majestic mountains and lush agricultural land to create a stunning city contrasting in size and facade to other California cities such as San Francisco and Santa Maria. I recall mentioning to my future roommate over the summer that I hoped San Luis Obispo would never become too developed....   [tags: Urbanization Argumentative Persuasive Papers] 1336 words
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The Great Levittown Impact - The Great Levittown Impact The third listing for the definition of sprawl in the Merriam-Webster’s dictionary is as follows: “to spread or develop irregularly”. Unfortunately, this is the pattern, or lack thereof, with which America’s development is following. Every single day the world population rises, and these new babies have to live somewhere. Due to the fact that the birth rate is larger than that of the death rate in America (http://www.bartleby.com/151/a24.html), new homes and communities must be developed to accommodate all of the incoming people....   [tags: Urban Sprawl Urbanization Essays]
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Benefits and Problems Associated With Urbanisation - ... As much as it may only be a little drop in the PH level can affect many species that require a specific level of acidity. As climate change accelerates, so do the effects of it. We have begun to see a link between climate change and extreme weather patterns as well as an increase in natural disasters such as: Extreme temperature highs – heat waves, storms, including windstorms, hurricanes, etc, high levels of precipitation, and associated flooding, lack of precipitation, and associated drought (Anderson and Bausch, 2006)....   [tags: industrial revolution, massive population]
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Relationship Between Urbanisation and Climate Change - Index Topic Page no. Introduction 3 Rationale 3 Key Issues How climate change and urbanisation relate Local perspective National perspective Global perspective 4 Analysis 5 Conclusion 6 Learning Outcome 6 Bibliography 6 Acknowledgement 7 Association between Climate Change and Urbanisation Introduction Urbanisation refers to the physical progression of urban areas....   [tags: Global Warming Essays]
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Urbanisation - Urbanisation Urbanisation is the increase in the proportion of people who live in cities. There is a great increase in the rate of urbanisation all around the world. During the nineteenth century urbanisation took place in the UK. However in developed countries like the UK, urbanisation seems to be slowing down. However in less developed countries urbanisation is taking place. Urbanisation has taken place all over the world. One of the major reasons for it is because there are better paid jobs in the city; so more people want the ideal lifestyle, a nice house and lots of money....   [tags: Papers] 524 words
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Explaining the Term Urbanisation - Explaining the Term Urbanisation Urbanisation is the process in which the number of people living in cities increases compared with the number of people living in rural areas. A country is considered to be urbanised when over 50% of its population lives in urban places. In the UK the movement of people from rural to urban areas followed the industrial revolution as people were needed to work in the factories in the CBD. It took place throughout the 19th and Early 20th Centuries in Europe and North America....   [tags: Papers] 1220 words
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The Effects of Rapid Urbanisation on Urban Areas - The Effects of Rapid Urbanisation on Urban Areas Urbanisation is the growth in the proportion of people living in urban areas compared to rural areas and has rapidly taken place over the last 200 years, particularly between 1800 and 1850, where there was a population explosion. Also, more recently, between 1950 and 1990, the proportion of people in the world living in urban areas increased by 20%. Currently the rate of urbanisation is much less rapid in MEDC’s than LEDC’s as a large majority of the population are already living in urban areas....   [tags: Papers] 774 words
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Investigating the Impact of Urbanisation in Santiago, Chile - Investigating the Impact of Urbanisation in Santiago, Chile Introduction I am looking at the effects which have taken place in Santiago due to urbanisation and also what their government has done to make it better. The urbanisation that has taken place in Chile’s capital city has the same causes, problems and advantages as many other cities. The main aspect to look at is the growth in population and the density of the city. This tells us how rapidly or slowly urbanisation has taken place over a period of time....   [tags: Papers] 619 words
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Urbanisation and Changes in Scottish Leisure, Religion and Education - Urbanisation and Changes in Scottish Leisure, Religion and Education In the 1880s people in Scotland were just as likely to live in a town or city as they were to live in the countryside. However by 1939 this had radically changed and most people were now urban dwellers. The process of urbanisation during this time is thought by many historians to have "affected the lives of ordinary people in all sorts of ways" (Sydney Wood). In particular there was notable changes in leisure, religion and education....   [tags: Papers] 1115 words
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Urban Geography: Chile - Chilean Landscape Chile is located along the southwestern coast of South America and has the Andes Mountains on one side and the Pacific Ocean on the other. The landscape in Chile offers diversity from deserts, forests, rivers, glaciers and valleys. Chile has three different climate zones and they experience a variety of seasons to support their primary sector of agriculture and produce variety of fruits including grapes to manufacture wine. ("Chile facts and," 2007) Population Density: Urban or Rural....   [tags: Geography ]
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Boom Towns Of The Amazon - Urban Geography Boom Towns of the Amazon The Amazon Basin has been called the last frontier. Although there has been a considerable amount of government investments in rural development, the majority of Amozonia is urban. Charles Wageley said that the “Typical Amozonian town was lethargic and backwards due to its seclusion.'; Every year many people are killed in land disputes in this area. With all the social and environmental changes rapid urbanization in the Amazon has been overlooked....   [tags: essays research papers] 424 words
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Quality of life Increases in Correlation to Social Unrest in 19th Century Europe - In the late 19th to early 20th century intellectual trends of the upper end of society differed vastly from the mindset of the general populace, with the mindset of social unrest largely trending towards the intellectuals of society. Due to the social welfare movements that were nascent in the late 19th century the standard of living for the mass populace in Europe did improve, which essentially meant said populace did not participate in the social unrest that was born in the minds of the society who disagreed with certain forms of social change....   [tags: European History ]
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Developmental Origins of Permanent Inequality from Neolithic Revolution to Urban Revolution - The revolutionary evolution of culture can be analyzed through a shift in complexity of social organization. Population growth triggered a need for cohesion, resource surplus, distribution and regulations of surplus implicating widespread population trade networks. These causal factors of the Neolithic Revolution incorporate other potential causal factors that implies through these three pathways a sociopolitical transformation developed, Urbanization. By identifying the Neolithic revolutionary factors this paper will be able to directly correlate the urbanization aspect in a generalized cause and effect description....   [tags: Social Issues, The Revolutionary Evolution] 1792 words
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Virtual Communities: A Sociological Perspective From Pastoral Village to Metropolis - The technical, functional, and symbolic characteristics of the Internet may have changed the ways that communities are formed and experienced through a decentralized global communication network that transcends physical time and space. While this notion of “virtual community” is closely associated with the emergence of information communication technologies (ICTs), the idea that communities can be seen as series of social ties that vary in density, size and nature is not a novel concept. The rise of cities and urban centers as a result of industrialization have long concerned sociologists, many of whom (e.g., Wirth, 1938; Woodsworth, 1911) feared that traditional social relations that perme...   [tags: Sociology ] 1966 words
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South Africa: The Impact of World War II - ... There the Africans could start a new life with much better opportunities for themselves. It was already mentioned that urbanization played a huge role in the migration of Africans from other regions to South Africa in the post World War II period and this helped the population of South Africa to also increase. After World War II, the population of the Africans living in South Africa pretty much doubled because urbanization was increasing in South Africa and this would cause the people to migrate there (South Africa- The Impact of World War II)....   [tags: post world war II, migration]
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The Loss of Coastal Wetlands - The Loss of Coastal Wetlands This paper introduces the environmental concerns of the loss of coastal wetlands. The paper will discuss the significance of wetlands and the devastation that is occurring because of human activity. Wetlands are an essential element of our environment both ecological and societal; conservation will be essential for the preservation of these precious ecosystems. Globally coastal wetlands are disappearing at an alarming rate, the problem is most of society does not realize the value of these precious wetlands....   [tags: Conservation, Causes, Characteristics]
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The Worlds Battle with Obesity - ... Urban centres have more roads, cars, and many other meens of transportation, this results less walking or biking transportation. This makes it hard for people all around the world to fit in their daily physical exercise. The Changes in Cultural Norms and Behaviour Fast shifts to an urban lifestyle and economic growth are also a big cause for the global obesity epidemic in low- middle income countries. One example of this is unhealthy food and beverages being heavily advertised combined with the West overeating ways can greatly impact the food choices and behaviour towards food therefore tempting people towards the unhealthier choices....   [tags: physical activity, healthy food]
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The Economic Underpinnings of the First Industrial Revolution in England - The Economic Underpinnings of the First Industrial Revolution in England The manufacture of military munitions and the development of a home market were critical underpinnings of the first industrial revolution in Britain. Military manufacturing supported by the British Government contributed directly to technological innovation and spurred industrialization. This is because the companies that choose to fulfill the government contracts to make military munitions found money could be made if new processes and technology was developed to fulfill the huge contracts....   [tags: essays research papers] 449 words
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An evaluation of property tax system in Malaysia - 1.0 Introduction Rapid population growth and increasing urbanization have triggers increases in demand for real property. These developments ultimate translate to the responsibility of local authority in providing facilities for the public. Therefore, local government need some sources to provide these facilities. Basically local government income comes from taxes, fees and fines. Property taxes are the largest fund and backbone of municipal finance which is used to provide amenities and services....   [tags: Government, Malaysia's Real Property] 1696 words
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Envisioning Urban Futures: Machelen-Diegem's Master plan - Machelen-Diegem Machelen, a cozy Flemish town is located in Brussels city of Belgium. It is home to a lot of historical values. The site is considered to be at a strategic place for economic development. Industrial estates, commercial establishment, large job market attract large population to settle in and around Machelen - Diegem. This is as a result of its centralized location in the arteries of Europe’s capital. The site has reached its full blown in terms of infrastructure development. Machelen is also acknowledged for the location of main airport of the country....   [tags: urban design, master plan]
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The Progressive Era of American History Illustrated in the Novel, Ragtime - The turn of the century in America introduced new inventions, new lifestyles, and new cultures. This time was called the “progressive era”. The cities were bustling and new amazements came every day. The storyline and the characters in the novel, Ragtime, represent the changes of this time period. From Emma Goldman, to mother, to Evelyn Nesbit, all people and their lives evolved in this period. Emma Goldman, an anarchist, fought for freedom in all aspects of life. Mother became the head of the family and grew into a strong woman who could support herself....   [tags: ragtime]
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A Cleaner Future: A Comprehensive Pollution Prevention and Reduction Program - A Cleaner Future: A Comprehensive Pollution Prevention and Reduction Program Introduction Pollution is a major problem globally and it becomes greater as the human population continues to rise exponentially. One of the major problems with increased population is higher waste production, which creates increased air, soil, and water pollution. To resolve this problem waste reduction must be of primary importance in preventing and reducing pollution. Waste management can be an expensive undertaking if not managed correctly so sustainable practices must be addressed....   [tags: Environmentalism, Pollution Control]
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Wall-E: Urbanism, Helath Care, Population, and Social Movements - In the movie Wall-E by John Carter, a robot by the name of Wall-E has a life job of cleaning up the Earth that had been destroyed and polluted by the human race as it became overpopulated and contaminated by too much urbanization. When Wall-E meets a robot by the name of Eve, who’s mission is to find a source of life on Earth, he travels to the spaceship that holds the entire population of Earth in order to save Eve. While saving Eve, he discovers how the human race is unable to care for themselves, and need to be persistently cared for by on-board robots....   [tags: John Carter, film, robot, Earth]
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The Story of Peter the Great of Russia - ... The uptick in privileges that nobles had as the eighteenth century came to a close was drastically different from the amount of service they were obliged to give and the lack of many privileges at the beginning of that same century. Under the reign of Catherine II, also known as Catherine the Great, during the eighteenth century, nobles gained privileges and townspeople started de-urbanization. Serfs “provided the gentry with wealth and future incomes” (Kahan, 49) while agriculture became a developing industry....   [tags: russian culture,westernization,russian society]
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Effects of the Industrial Revolution - The Industrial Revolution that took place throughout the 18th and the 19th centuries had major effects which influenced every aspect of society and life such as, urbanization, imperialism and nationalism. The industrial revolution had an unfathomable effect on shaping the modern world to what it is today. Before the revolution, society revolved around farming and agriculture. There were only two social classes, the nobility and the working class. Little did they know, that their lives were about to change dramatically and continue changing for the next generations to come....   [tags: Industrial Revolution, World History] 1162 words
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Impact of the Industrialization Era (Great Britain and United States) - The industrialization era is one of the most important and wonderful events that have occurred in the past 400 years. Industrialization has had an over all ripple effect upon the world. “Industrialization led to a better quality of life for most people” (Beck, 723). While it may seem to some that Industrialization only impacted Great Britain, it is actually true that industrialization many characteristics and consequences that had a worldwide impact. Industrialization had its up’s and down’s such as economic prosperity, jobs, and innovation....   [tags: british history, industrialize, european history] 620 words
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Industrial Revolution Seminar Questions - 1) What caused the Industrial Revolution. There are multiple reasons that the Industrial Revolution started. It was mostly made possible by a revolution in agriculture, which improved farm productivity. New types of soil, the development of crop rotating, and the invention of new devices, such as the seed drill, all served to increase the quantity and quality of farm produce. This meant that there were less famines, and that women would have stronger babies, so population skyrocketed. Population explosion from both declining death rates and the enclosure movement, in which rich landowners kicked farmers off their land, resulted in more people migrating to the cities to find jobs....   [tags: Industrial Revolution, questions,] 1306 words
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Development in Flood Zone - The world population has more than doubled in last 50 years (from 2.52 billion in 1950 to 6 billion in 2000). Moreover the United Nations (1999) estimate that 97% of growth is taking place in less developed countries, with Africa as a fast growing Area. Cities such as Bombay, Calcutta, Karachi, Jakarta, Nairobi, Manila, Lagos and Cairo are examples of rapid human concentration. This makes the current planning strategies insufficient and ineffective (if they even exist). Consequently, slums and squatters and informal settlements in those cities are the expression of a marginalization of a big and growing range of city dwellers (Sietchiping 2000)....   [tags: Population, Urban Areas] 790 words
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Theory of Demographic Transition - The `Theory of Demographic Transition' embraces the observation that all countries in the world go through different stages in the growth of population. A nation's economy and level of development is directly related to that nation's birth and death rates. Population history can be divided into three main stages, which apply to third world, second world and first world nations. These stages or classifications demonstrate a transition from high birth and death rates to low birth and death rates. The `Theory of Demographic Transition' suggests that all nations begin in stage one as underdeveloped, third world nations and through time transition into first world nations....   [tags: Sociology] 820 words
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