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Urbanisation - Urbanisation Urbanisation is the increase in the proportion of people who live in cities. There is a great increase in the rate of urbanisation all around the world. During the nineteenth century urbanisation took place in the UK. However in developed countries like the UK, urbanisation seems to be slowing down. However in less developed countries urbanisation is taking place. Urbanisation has taken place all over the world. One of the major reasons for it is because there are better paid jobs in the city; so more people want the ideal lifestyle, a nice house and lots of money....   [tags: Papers] 524 words
(1.5 pages)
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Explaining the Term Urbanisation - Explaining the Term Urbanisation Urbanisation is the process in which the number of people living in cities increases compared with the number of people living in rural areas. A country is considered to be urbanised when over 50% of its population lives in urban places. In the UK the movement of people from rural to urban areas followed the industrial revolution as people were needed to work in the factories in the CBD. It took place throughout the 19th and Early 20th Centuries in Europe and North America....   [tags: Papers] 1220 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Effects of Rapid Urbanisation on Urban Areas - The Effects of Rapid Urbanisation on Urban Areas Urbanisation is the growth in the proportion of people living in urban areas compared to rural areas and has rapidly taken place over the last 200 years, particularly between 1800 and 1850, where there was a population explosion. Also, more recently, between 1950 and 1990, the proportion of people in the world living in urban areas increased by 20%. Currently the rate of urbanisation is much less rapid in MEDC’s than LEDC’s as a large majority of the population are already living in urban areas....   [tags: Papers] 774 words
(2.2 pages)
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Investigating the Impact of Urbanisation in Santiago, Chile - Investigating the Impact of Urbanisation in Santiago, Chile Introduction I am looking at the effects which have taken place in Santiago due to urbanisation and also what their government has done to make it better. The urbanisation that has taken place in Chile’s capital city has the same causes, problems and advantages as many other cities. The main aspect to look at is the growth in population and the density of the city. This tells us how rapidly or slowly urbanisation has taken place over a period of time....   [tags: Papers] 619 words
(1.8 pages)
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What gave rise to urbanisation in the mediterranean - “What gave rise to urbanisation in the Mediterranean region?” What is urbanisation. To ‘urbanise’ is to ‘make (a rural area) more industrialized and urban’ , urban meaning ‘of or living in a city or town’ . Marja C.V. Vink argues that “The word urbanization was used for the first time in Spain a little more than one hundred years ago” to show the “quantitative and qualitative growth if cities” . The degree of urbanisation is quite different when comparing towns or cities of antiquity to the modern understanding of an urban centre; however, essentially it is the same process....   [tags: essays research papers] 2334 words
(6.7 pages)
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Urbanisation and Changes in Scottish Leisure, Religion and Education - Urbanisation and Changes in Scottish Leisure, Religion and Education In the 1880s people in Scotland were just as likely to live in a town or city as they were to live in the countryside. However by 1939 this had radically changed and most people were now urban dwellers. The process of urbanisation during this time is thought by many historians to have "affected the lives of ordinary people in all sorts of ways" (Sydney Wood). In particular there was notable changes in leisure, religion and education....   [tags: Papers] 1115 words
(3.2 pages)
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Problems Due To Urbanization - Recently, as developed countries, many cities have become more suitable to live in with all facilities that people need in favor of a comfortable live style. Therefore, many people migrate from rural areas to urban areas in a process so called urbanization (Wikipedia, 2009). Urbanization has become one of the most important issues facing both people live and governments in most countries. An important term that has been suggested as a policy to solve the problems associated with urbanization is sustainable development....   [tags: Urbanization]
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1072 words
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The Implications of Rapid Urbanization - ... These conditions are conducive for the growth of diseases such as malaria and cholera (WHO estimates that about 3000 children die of malaria daily and about 3-5 million lives are lost through cholera annually) (Knudsen & Slooff, 1992). Nigeria, Africa has experienced an increase in the mortality rate of young children with the rapid urbanization. This is so because a large number of the disadvantaged society in urban areas is socioeconomic disadvantaged thus increasing the risks to children....   [tags: Urbanization]
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Why Does Urbanization Occur? - Urbanisation is the process which has led to an increasing proportion of a country's population living within urban areas. It is impossible to say exactly when the process began, but in Britain it was around the time of the industrial revolution. Many people moved from rural to urban areas in search of regular employment. The MEDC's around the world are all urbanised now, with annual growth rates of urbanisation still increasing, but sustainably. LEDC's however are still rapidly urbanising. In this essay I am going to look at all the factors that cause urbanisation and evaluate why it is occurring....   [tags: World Cultures] 808 words
(2.3 pages)
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Urbanization - ... A suitable way of solving this problem is by spreading awareness amongst people. An important fact is that people have little knowledge on the serious effects of air pollution, and how it has a negative effect on human's health and the environment. The most crucial reason that is causing high number of cars and the fewer use of public transportation is the people's mentality. Keep Britain Tidy is an environmental charity working to achieve cleaner, greener places for everyone (Keep Britain Tidy Consultancy, 2009)....   [tags: Sustainable Development] 2284 words
(6.5 pages)
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Urbanization in Africa - ... So this is saying that government development policies and budget divisions, in which urban residents are often favorites over rural areas and will tend to pull more people into the urban areas. In the cities, public investment often misses the urban poor; with expenses biased towards the higher-income classes and the poor among defenseless groups such as new migrants who force them into slums (Saundry, 2008). As one can see this is something that many people would not want happening. Therefore, the market forces results in a series of changes in employment, urban agriculture and urban production systems....   [tags: Development, Urban Trend] 1087 words
(3.1 pages)
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Urbanization and Crime - ... Aggression was measured from a series of questions asking about how people felt towards the others in their space. Controlled variables included household income, ethnicity and gender. “The threshold for aggression is identical to that for withdrawal: 1.18 persons per room. After this point, the deleterious effect of density begins to take off and increased crowding leads to more aggressive responses among individuals.” (Regoeczi , p. 521.) Although the data analysis is limited to one city and does not consider the effects of overall population density on human behavior, the author and the results reflect that when people feel crowded, they tend to withdraw from the situation to retreat into calmer areas to avoid instinctive aggressive responses to high stress situations....   [tags: Social Studies]
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Impacts Of Urbanization - Many villagers and small town dwellers want a living in big cities. With some expectations, they make a movement from villages to big cities. This migration from rural areas to big cities is called urbanization. There are two kinds of factors why rural people seek for urban life. The first one is urban pull factor. They dream for higher wages, better housing and utilities, better school and hospital, more jobs opportunity, and more experience that they can get it all from a living in big cities as they think....   [tags: essays research papers] 396 words
(1.1 pages)
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Communities and Urbanization - COMMUNITIES & URBANIZATION Introduction George Murdock once said that a community is one of the two truly universal units of society organization, the other one being family (Schaefer, 461). We are all part of a community, and in many cases, we are a part of multiple ones. In chapter 20 of our textbook, we are looking at communities and urbanization. It discusses urbanization and how communities originate. It also looks at the different types of communities....   [tags: essays research papers] 2594 words
(7.4 pages)
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The Relationship Between Urbanization and Industrialization - The industrial Revolution, starting in late 18th century, had a significant urbanizing effect. Industrialization is the basic driving force of urbanization and urbanization, cities, are the important land for industrialization. Industrialization and urbanization are just like brothers that grow and develop together and developed each other (Lexicon Universal Encyclopedia, 1997). Industrialization is the initiator of urbanization and urbanization is the inevitable result of industrialization. The inventions of railroad tracks, automobiles, telephones, airplanes and electricity are a part of industrialization and the growth of cities, urbanization, during the late 1800s and early 1900s....   [tags: american history, industrial revolution]
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899 words
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Urbanization & Applied Anthropology - ... This includes products and services for the community as well as global market places. There is competition which leaves people with many options and keeps the price low. Urbanization also leads to efficiency and convenience. More families are able to live in a smaller area which maximizes land use. This includes several houses on a block or several families in a building complex. Less effort is necessary to provide water, heat, energy, and trash disposal to residents. In addition, recycling programs help to reduce and reuse resources....   [tags: Anthropology ]
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1818 words
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Urbanization Problems and Sustainable Development - ... The solutions for this traffic jam problem are investing more in public transportation, sophisticated traffic management systems, controls on automobile use (Newman, 1999, p. 156). Most countries such as Hongkong, Singapore, and Tokyo have succeeded to reduce car dependence by investing more in public transport (Newman, 1999, p. 156). In other hands, it is true that just investing in public transport may not succeed such as what happen in Los Angeles where car habit is the people’s culture (Thisdell, 1993, p....   [tags: Social Issues]
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1366 words
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Consensus vs. Urbanization - Consensus vs. Urbanization The process of modernization contains many elements, which work together in many ways. The two elements that I will be discussing are consensus and urbanization. Consensus is when a group or groups of people come to an agreement with each other. Urbanization is the development of cities. Consensus makes the social forces stronger. Social forces strengthen with higher levels of consensus because more people are agreeing with each other. The social forces can now begin to agree on the things they want and most likely get the things they want....   [tags: Papers] 761 words
(2.2 pages)
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Urbanization and Human Influence - Urbanization and Human Influence It is estimated that by the year 2000, half the world population will live in urban environments (Porter and Brown, 1996). The US Bureau of the Census defines an area as being urbanized if a central city and its closely settled surrounding territory are of a certain size with 50,000 people and density of at least 1,000 people per square mile (Knox, 1994). A component of the definition denotes that human influence is a main aspect of urbanized areas in the process of urbanization....   [tags: Environmental Geology Essays]
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841 words
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urbanization in third world countries - Urbanization and its effect on third world living conditions Urbanization is the spreading of cities into less populated agricultural areas. Most people would not think that this is necessarily a problem. They would say that it is good that the “developing countries” were becoming more developed. With urbanization comes factories and more jobs, so the people can make more money and be happier. Right. The problem is that these people must sacrifice their traditional lifestyles, for this new “Urbanism”(the way of life, attitudes, values, and patterns of behavior fostered by urban settings Knox 234)....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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1296 words
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Sub-urbanization in America - Sub-urbanization in America AHousing is an outward expression of the inner human nature; no society can be understood apart from the residences of its members.@ That is a quote from the suburban historian Kenneth T. Jackson, from his magnificent piece on suburbanization Crabgrass Frontier. Suburbanization has been probably the most significant factor of change in U.S. cities over the last 50 years, and began 150 years ago. It represents Aa reliance upon the private automobile, upward mobility, the separation of the family into nuclear units, the widening division between work and leisure, and a tendency toward racial and economic exclusiveness.@ Overall it may represent the change in attitude of the American people....   [tags: Papers] 3293 words
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Urbanization problems can be met by sustainable development? - ... Increasing population in urban areas is causing traffic jam. The reason for this is the fact that automobile dependence in cities is increasing all over the world from the 1980s to projected 1990s. US, European, Asian, Australian, and Canadian cities increase the number but with a different pace (ESCAP as cited in Newman, 1999, p. 153). Some Asian cities like Bangkok, Jakarta, and Kuala Lumpur suffer from this automobile dependence trend. The traffic jams in these cities are very bad. A lot of money is wasted because they burned fossil fuels for nothing except pollution....   [tags: Social Issues, Population, Conception Policy] 1305 words
(3.7 pages)
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American Urbanization - With the population of America growing exponentially during the 19th century, migration from the country to the city became increasingly popular. As more and more people called the city their “home”, a Pandora’s Box of problems arose. Everything from overcrowded housing to unsanitary living conditions plagued the cities with new diseases during this time. To warn the people of these problems, author’s such as Washington Irving, Walt Whitman and Edgar Allen Poe helped make Americans more conscious about moving to the city....   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 1178 words
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Mesopotamia Urbanization - ... Due to the advancement of technology, the crops in Mesopotamia prospered and it gave the earliest civilizations a surplus of food. On the banks of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the farmers of the area cultivated and produced a vast amount of vegetables, fruits and grains. Dates, grapes, figs, melons and apples were some of the most popular fruits among the civilizations. Furthermore, lettuce, radishes, beans and onions were plentiful in the region and the Mesopotamians favorite food during the time was eggplant (Ascalone)....   [tags: World Civilization ]
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The Important of Cities in Roman Provinces - ... In the description of Panopeus, a small town in Phocis, Pausnias described what he considered essential for cities to have: an agora, a fountain house, a proper water supply, and various other amenities. Pausnias did not agree that Panopeus was a city since it did not have, what in his view were, essential amenities of a city. He had to agree that it had the status of a polis but Panopeus should merely be a village. Urbanism is not solely concerned with the physical arrangement of the city, but also by the influence of the political role in the community....   [tags: Urbanization, Roman History]
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Beautiful Ravenswood - Beautiful Ravenswood Enabling roads Grand River Ave. retraces one of the seven or eight significant Indian trials that led to De’troit as the French called it, the city on the straits. It travels ZZZ miles from the City center through the Northwestern suburbs towards Brighton, Howell and ultimately parallels the Grand River before it flows through Michigan’s state Capital of Lansing. By the 1840’s The Old Grand River Indian trail was but a muddy, mucky pair of ruts that was often impassable for months out of the year....   [tags: Urbanization] 1145 words
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Urban City Stereotypes - Stereotypes of urban cities commonly reflect the portrayal of minorities which they are seen as poor and criminals in comparison to the middle and upper Caucasian class. Such stereotypes are an effect of environmental racism. However, to divert from the spread of negative and racist stereotypes, the local government must reflect a better city. In this paper, I am going to explain the benefits of new regionalism in relation to urban cities and minorities. Having influence from Manuel Pastor and Myron Orfield, minorities need attention from their local government to better their lives....   [tags: Urbanization] 1905 words
(5.4 pages)
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New Urbanism: A Step Forward - ... New Urbanism looks to create communities that have a wide range of diversity in both physical and social aspects. According to Peter Calthorpe there are four fundamental elements of community, “civic places, commercial uses, housing opportunities, and natural systems,”(Calthorpe 332) which can be used to define the physical elements of diversity at any scale. In the physical sense mixed use developments allow for many different types of buildings to be within one area. One of the main tactics that New Urbanism advises using is mixed-use zoning, which allows for a mix of retail and residential....   [tags: Urbanization]
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Food Security in the Developed and the Developing World - ... For example, in Australia climate change has reduced the production of local rice and wheat crops by drought and diseases. (Teng and Escaler, 2010). Both of the developed and the developing world are affected by the factor of climate change, but the developing countries are affected more than the developed countries. The developed countries with a high level of income can resolve their problems by import and export from other countries to be food secured. However, the developing countries are depending on the developed countries to donate food for them due to low level of income....   [tags: Urbanization]
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Modern Metropolis - ... (Unesco) As a result, today people from everywhere can easily recognize this traditional city and its spirit, especially for the Palio. “ The palio and the contrade of Siena are unique in present-day Italy and have attracted a great deal of interest among travelers and writers. Of the diverse interpretations of the palio, most require little discussion: that it is chaotic ("the world's wackiest horse race"), corrupt ("the world's crookedest horse race"), an ancient survival, a revival for the benefit of tourists, a religious devotion, a paramilitary expression, a sport, and others....   [tags: Urbanization]
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How is Sprawl Related to Landscape Change in Cities? - How is Sprawl Related to Landscape Change in Cities. Over the past 20 years the 100 largest US urbanized areas have sprawled an additional 14,545 square miles according to the US Bureau of Census on Urbanized Areas. That was more than 9 million acres of natural habitats, farmland and other rural space that were covered over by asphalt, buildings and housing of suburbia. A major controversy in the efforts to halt the rural land loss is whether land-use and consumption decisions are the primary engines of urban sprawl, or whether it is the nation’s growing population boom that is providing the driving expansion....   [tags: Urbanization Sprawl Urban Essays]
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The Comparisons Between Two Innovative Urbanizations; Mesoamerica and Sumer - Sumer and Mesoamerica are primitive urbanizations that have independently developed in their religion, architecture, government, ect. and it makes each one unique. From the Tigris and Euphrates River in 3500 B.C.E., the place of Sumer had begun and has developed to what we know today as Iraq. Also, the place of Mexico, which begun along the Gulf Coast of Mexico in 3000 B.C.E. Both of these primary urbanizations are important to the world around us because it explains why and how the places interact the way they do now, in the present....   [tags: World History]
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1577 words
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Urban Population, Megacities, and Motivation - Urban Population, Megacities, and Motivation The social phenomenon of urbanization and emergence of megacities in the world’s inhabitation pattern is proved to be an effect that co-exists with human. The biggest launch of the early centuries was caused by the Industrial Revolution and in the latest years, Globalization, established a new basis to the issue. It has been observed to have had a most rapid growing rate in the 20th century due to mainly internal migration of native people from rural areas to cities, that in combination with the global growing birth rate and technology revolution has brought this effect to the proscenium of more economically developed countries and developing countries of the world....   [tags: Urbanization Housing Big Cities Economy Essays] 805 words
(2.3 pages)
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Planning Community for Halstead - I am an independent planning advisor commissioned by the Sevenoaks District Council to provide recommendations for the future development of Halstead. This report will take into account not only the local issues but also the wider context of housing and development in the UK. Halstead is located 14 miles from London within its Green Belt. It has good communications, both rail and road, and is 28 minutes away from Gatwick Airport. Due to the current shortage of housing in the UK, there is a lot of pressure on the south east of England, especially places around London, to build housing as well as industry....   [tags: Community] 2375 words
(6.8 pages)
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The Factors that Influence the Flood Hydrograph - The Factors that Influence the Flood Hydrograph Introduction In this essay I aim to find out the ways in which they affect the flood hydrograph, with particular reference to rural and urbanised drainage basins of Tokyo. A drainage basin is an area of the land's surface from which a river receives its supply of water. An imaginary line can mark the edge of a drainage basin. This is called the watershed. The other main features of a drainage basin are shown in figure 1. The drainage basin relies on the atmosphere for its inputs of water, whilst water passes through the drainage basin leaves the system either to return to the atmosphere or to become an input into the coastal and ocean systems....   [tags: Papers] 953 words
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Tearing Down a City to Build a Shopping Mall - Tearing Down a City to Build a Shopping Mall I exited US Highway 101 South at Madonna Road, squinting into the sun through the windshield of a friends borrowed truck. As I neared the Central Coast Plaza that includes Staples, Bed Bath & Beyond and other retailers, I wondered what was to become of the Dalidio farmland, just south of the shopping center. 130acres of farmland sit just ten yards from the center, separated only by the newly paved Dalidio Road. I thought about how neat it is that we can have agriculture in such close proximity to large scale retail and both can prosper....   [tags: Urbanization Argumentative Papers]
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Keep San Luis Obispo Unique - Keep San Luis Obispo Unique When I began looking at colleges two years ago, I was attracted to Cal Poly in large part due to San Luis Obispo’s unique small town charm. The downtown area boasts distinctive shops and restaurants, a treat for any visitor. This is coupled with majestic mountains and lush agricultural land to create a stunning city contrasting in size and facade to other California cities such as San Francisco and Santa Maria. I recall mentioning to my future roommate over the summer that I hoped San Luis Obispo would never become too developed....   [tags: Urbanization Argumentative Persuasive Papers] 1336 words
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The Great Levittown Impact - The Great Levittown Impact The third listing for the definition of sprawl in the Merriam-Webster’s dictionary is as follows: “to spread or develop irregularly”. Unfortunately, this is the pattern, or lack thereof, with which America’s development is following. Every single day the world population rises, and these new babies have to live somewhere. Due to the fact that the birth rate is larger than that of the death rate in America (http://www.bartleby.com/151/a24.html), new homes and communities must be developed to accommodate all of the incoming people....   [tags: Urban Sprawl Urbanization Essays]
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The High Price of Urban Sprawl - The High Price of Urban Sprawl Urban sprawl is a social pattern describing the way cities continue to grow outward uncontrollably. People who do not want to live in an urban atmosphere often seek refuge in suburban areas that have access to metropolitan areas. As more people follow this trend the suburban areas slowly become developed and new areas must be sought for people to inhabit. This leaves some city workers commuting in trains, cars, or even buses for hours. Urban sprawl is not the luxury that it seems to be but actually a social pattern with a great deal of costs....   [tags: Urbanization Urban Essays]
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Natural Hazards and Their Effect on Rich and Poor Countries - Natural Hazards and Their Effect on Rich and Poor Countries 'Poor countries are more at risk from natural hazards than rich countries.' For this question to be answered the meaning of the word "risk" needs to be considered carefully. It may be referring to the risk of loss of lives or money. Perhaps it is referring to geographical location creating more or less of a risk....   [tags: Papers] 1667 words
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The Renouncer Tradition - The Renouncer Tradition Before I begin to explain what exactly the renouncer tradition is, I think that it is important to give a brief outline of the religious history pre-dating this tradition, and also to acknowledge the social life at the time and its mentality. By the time that the renouncer tradition was beginning to establish some recognition, sixth century B.C.E, a group of texts called the Veda had been in existence and had been enjoying their religious influence upon the Indian culture for about a thousand years....   [tags: Papers] 2353 words
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The State of Britain in 1815 - The State of Britain in 1815 After the end of the Napoleonic wars between France and England, which had lasted about a quarter of a century, England was the most powerful country in the world. This had come about because of many changes throughout Britain in Industry, Agriculture, Society, and Politics and also because of International incidents. The culmination of all these changes was that Britain had changed dramatically and had become a much more 'modern' state. In this essay I will be exploring the changes and what effects they had....   [tags: Papers] 1131 words
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Analysis Of Brazils Migration Trends - Analysis Of Brazils Migration Trends The country that I will be analysing for migration trends is Brazil. Brazil is in South America as you can see from the map above. There is a lot of different migration in Brazil. Many different migration schemes are occurring all over the world, things such as. Ø War Ø Slave Trade Ø Jobs Ø Don’t like area Ø Actors, musicians etc Brazil is a bit different though because it has an overcrowding problem, and the government has it’s way of moving people....   [tags: Papers] 1084 words
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The Land Use Patterns Typical of a Sub-Urbanized Village in the U.K. and the Way in Which the Patterns are Changing - The Land Use Patterns Typical of a Sub-Urbanized Village in the U.K. and the Way in Which the Patterns are Changing Suburbanisation is the increased movement of people, services and industries from the centres and inner urban areas outwards, towards and onto the edges of the built-up area taking over land that was previously rural. A suburbanised village has grown as a result of being populated by those who have moved out of urban areas. As this occurs in villages in the UK so the conversions of old barns and shops takes place....   [tags: Papers] 785 words
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The Extent to Which Economic Developments Had Made Britain into an Industrial Nation by 1830 - The Extent to Which Economic Developments Had Made Britain into an Industrial Nation by 1830 By 1830, Britain had undergone essential and irreversible structural changes in the economy and industry. Its urban labour force was also considerably altered and had grown tremendously in the previous 50 years to the expense of agricultural labour. However not all the characteristics of an industrial nation were present by 1830 and a lot was still to be done. One of the features of an industrial nation is a large rate of economic growth, 2% p.a., which was achieved by Britain well before 1830....   [tags: Papers] 904 words
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INTRODUCING THE SERVICE DELIVERY AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION CONUNDRUM IN KHAYELITSHA - 1.1 INTRODUCING THE SERVICE DELIVERY AND CITIZEN PARTICIPATION CONUNDRUM IN KHAYELITSHA This study presents an assessment of connections between service delivery – water services in particular – and participatory strategies adopted by different communities. This study was thought-out within a context of heightened militancy in local government as exemplified by the widespread and so called service delivery protests in 2005-2006. A large body of literature (e.g. Benit-Gbaffou 2008a, 2008b, Piper and Nadvi 2010, Tapscott 2010, 2005, Ballard et al 2006, Miraftab 2006, and Zeurn 2001) already exists on the state-civil society nexus in the post apartheid era....   [tags: Africa] 1934 words
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Gerard Sekoto's Song of the Pick - ... John Mohl and Brother Roger Castle of St Peter's Secondary School also encourage Sekoto to exhibit his work and he started to gain name for himself in Johannesburg. Sekoto was becoming dysphoric because of the racially charged atmosphere which was suffocating him. He continued to paint every day scenes in the township, despite feeling despondent and depressed about the situation. In spite of his unhappiness, these were the 'golden years' of his art, during which he stared to develop his characteristic style....   [tags: Art Analysis ]
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Green Roof - ... However it was merely the growth of contemporary building materials and techniques that permitted the further extensive creation of green roofs. Linda and Velazquez, (2005) suggest that Germany were the first country to introduce true modern green roofs in the early 1970s and 1980s, therefore, there is no uncertainty that Germany is in the current centre of green roof movement throughout the globe. Approximately 14% of all flat roofs are green in Germany, and 80% of those are extensive systems which tender the most cost effective solution compare to intensive types (Herman, 2003)....   [tags: Environment, Plants, Structural Design] 1591 words
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Discourse Analysis - ... Yet, during urbanisation, in the 1830s, many moved from rural areas, to take up residence in cities. And although the attraction to move to urban areas was complex, Hinchliffe (2009, p. 210) points out, cities seemed attractive, they gave opportunities to earn a living wage and increase prosperity even if it was mainly through manufacturing. The text from Blaenau Gwent plays on the myth (discourse) of the idyllic countryside, by mentioning how the ‘natural environment’ can ‘improve people’s physical and mental wellbeing’....   [tags: Communication, Identity Work] 1056 words
(3 pages)
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Victoria Profile - ... However, this ratio shifts as the population ages. There are more females than males aged 30 years and over, reflecting a female’s longer life expectancy (ABS, 2006). Russel (2009) suggests that over the next 30 years the ageing of Victoria’s population will be substantial. It is estimated in 2036 that persons aged 70 years and above will account for 16.3% of Victoria’s population (Russel, 2009). Consequently, an ageing population will not only affect the workforce but also various infrastructure plans (ibid, pp.10)....   [tags: Country Analysis ]
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Gang Crime in United States of America - Gang Crime in United States of America As the United States of America moves into the new millennium the self styled 'leader of the free world' faces a highly complex problem that is threatening to destroy the fabric of its unique urban society. This problem has been developing for many years and has become entwined into the core of American society to such a point where it has virtually become accepted as the norm to the millions of people whose quality of life has been greatly reduced by it....   [tags: Papers]
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An Investigation Of Japanese Corporate Culture, Its Trends And Changes - An Investigation of Japanese Corporate Culture, Its Trends And Changes Japanese Business & Culture bus 258.1 Table of Contents1.0 Introduction 2.0 Procedure 3.0 Findings 3.1 Changing social culture. 3.2 Business Culture in Japan 3.3 Why change is needed 3.4 What is Japan and her corporations doing to develop and change 4.0 Conclusion 5.0 Bibliography Japanese Business & CultureAn investigation Japanese corporate culture, its trends and changes.1.0 IntroductionThis report is based around the following quote: "Japan's corporate culture is the product of uniquely Japanese social and historical influences, so deeply rooted as to easily repel outside influences....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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London's Economy - King (1990, page x) argues that the dissolution of empire has been critical to the growth of world cities. How far does this apply to London. Modern patterns of development and growth have been shaped and influenced by the historical context of colonialism. Within this context relationships between capitalist and pre-capitalist states or colonies helped forge a world economy, which would later lead to processes of globalisation and the current economic world order. Expansion in the world economy has been exacerbated by the freer flow of labour, goods, services and capital, which are features of the post-war, post-colonial world....   [tags: Economics]
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Human Impact on the Environment - Human Impact on the Environment About three hundred years ago there was a definite spurt in the population of the human race. This was brought about with advancements in sanitation and technology, as well as a dramatic fall in the death rate. By around 1850 the world's population had grown to about 1 billion and by 1930 it had risen to 2 billion. The current figure is around 6 billion and at this rate the United Nations estimates the population will be at about 9 billion by 2054....   [tags: Environmental Papers] 1539 words
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USA's Division into Two Different Societies by the Civil War - USA's Division into Two Different Societies by the Civil War The traditional interpretation of the American Civil War holds that the states of North America had become divided into two camps representing two very different societies by the 1860's. These societies had little common ground, with different economic and social infrastructures and were divided by the issue of slavery. This argument claims, therefore, that slave states and free states were bound to come into conflict since the north and the south were 'divided across a fault line delineated by the institution of slavery'[1]....   [tags: Papers] 3398 words
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Natural Hazards and the Interaction of Physical and Human Processes - Natural Hazards and the Interaction of Physical and Human Processes The earth has been producing hazards for millennia these include earthquakes and volcanoes caused by the movement of tectonic plates, and also wind and water elated disasters such as tornadoes and tsunamis, these can be varied by a countries location such as suffering drought due to be land locked or an island, also the relief on the land can contribute greatly to the hazards it faces.. All of these cause great destruction and can involves lots of energy, these events do not become disasters unless there are human factors involved, when people live on a fault line they are risking suffering from an earthquake, this combination of physical and human processes can lead to large losses not only in lives but also monetary due to lost land, employment and homes....   [tags: Papers] 644 words
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The River Rhine Case Study - The River Rhine Case Study The River Rhine rises in the Swiss Alps about 3,353 metres above sea level and flows north, passing through or bordering Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Austria, Germany, France, and the Netherlands and then its mouth is located at the North Sea. The Rhine is usually at its maximum volume during the seasons of spring and summer; this is due to the fact that there is the melted water of snow and glaciers. In this enquiry I am looking at the aspect of river flooding in the Rhine, particularly in 1995....   [tags: Papers] 954 words
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The Impact of Building Harlow New Town on Canon's Brook - The Impact of Building Harlow New Town on Canon's Brook There are likely to be many effects of building a town on a brook. We can see that the most probable responses would be that more water flows into the river and the flood risk increases. However, there are likely to be many other contributing factors and other responses to these rainfall events. In this essay, I am going to examine how the changes to the response of the river occur and what these changes actually are....   [tags: Papers] 954 words
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How and Why Rural Areas Have Changed - How and Why Rural Areas Have Changed It is difficult to define the word “rural” as you just can’t tell where rural begins anymore but people general have a common perception of what rural areas are like which has been generated by the media. This is known as the rural idyll because people usually see the countryside how the media presents it, although this is not the case anymore. And The rural area has changed dramatically over the last few decades the traditional rural area has changed from a typically quiet with traditional jobs in farming, pollution free, a small isolated village to something similar to the city suburbs these rural villages are know called Suburbanised villages this is because most former rural villages have changed, for example suburbanised villages know contain a lot more amenities, they are much bigger and are no longer pollution free....   [tags: Papers] 589 words
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The Demand for Housing in Britain - The Demand for Housing in Britain b) Imagine a builder proposed to built thousands of new homes on the green land around your nearest city. Suggest why this might need to be limited and outline possible alternatives. a) In Britain the demand for housing is growing rapidly and over time there will be no space for new homes to be built in urban areas. The increasing demand for the housing in Britain is mainly due to the extensive growth of the population in the country. From the trend of counter urbanisation more people want to build their homes in the countryside....   [tags: Papers] 818 words
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Four Types of Drainage Basin Stores - Four Types of Drainage Basin Stores In this essay I intend to give brief descriptions on 4 types of Drainage Basin Stores, and then explain how different human actions can influence these. As explained in previous pieces of work, the water system is made up of several stores and flows, one input (precipitation), and 3 outputs (run-off, evaporation, transpiration). The four main stores I am working on today are Interception, Soil, Surface and Ground water. Water will almost never land directly on a bare surface....   [tags: Papers] 862 words
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An evaluation of property tax system in Malaysia - ... CAMA system carries out mass calculation in a stipulated time with high degree of accuracy. The advantages of CAMA system are the outcome will be more objectivity; well documented; provision for regular or annual revaluations; and improvement in fairness, equity and economies of scale (McCluskey and Anand, 1999). The overall objective of this study aims to assess the problems faced by Local Authority in administrating the property tax and to develop strategies to help local government appraisals in the valuation of properties for taxation purposes....   [tags: Government, Malaysia's Real Property] 1696 words
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Stages in Development a Country Needs to Become a Self-sustaining Economy - Using Rostow's model as a basis what are the stages in development a country needs to become a self-sustaining economy. The Rostow model is used to detect what stage of development a nation is in, within the course of the 5 stages the increase in development will show that a country will gradually gain a self-sustaining economy. Within the 5 stages of the Rostow model each stage differs and eventually leads to a nation having a self-supporting economy. Within the first couple of stages (Stage 1 & 2) the economy needs to have some foreign direct investment and also must develop some form of capital formation....   [tags: Economic] 649 words
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Facts about the Global Trends - Facts about the Global Trends In this essay I will aim to answer the question, “Where, When & Why did the first states form?” This is an important question as the development of the states, is the turning point in civilisation from chiefdoms into a society, which is very similar to the one, which we live in today. The state can be defined many ways by different organisations; political theorists, historians, archaeologists and anthropologists all use different definitions. I will define the state as having a centralised government with, an elite ruling class of powerful families and rulers, a bureaucracy of government and ruling officials, an armed group which maintain a legitimate monopoly on force to impose decisions, and maintain law and order....   [tags: Papers] 1249 words
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Claudius - Claudius The emperor, Claudius, was a man with great integrity, individuality, common sense, patriotism and determination. From his struggles as a child to his death, was a remarkable journey. Many historians today and ancient Rome have placed him amongst the greats of all time. Despite his physical disabilities and background, Tiberius Claudius Nero contributed much to the greatness of the Roman Empire. Tiberius Claudius Nero is the youngest son of Nero Claudius Drusus and Antonia (Daughter of Antony and Octavia), giving him royal blood....   [tags: Ancient Rome Roman History] 1279 words
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Prohibiton - Prohibiton What was Prohibition Introduced. In the 1920's American politics was dominated by democracy and the idea of isolationism to keep America prosperous was incredibly apparent. However in 1919, President Wilson passed the 18th Amendment to the American Constitution prohibiting the manufacture, distribution and consumption of alcoholic drinks (any drink containing over 0.5% alcohol). Prohibition was not just a novel American idea, at the turn of the Twentieth Century, other countries were also experimenting with limiting or totally banning the production, distribution and consumption of alcoholic drinks the primary origins can be found all over the world....   [tags: American America History] 2833 words
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Environmental Crisis - Environmental Crisis "We Have An Environmental Crisis Because We Have A People Crisis - A Crisis of Population Growth, of Wasteful Consumption of Resources, and A Crisis of Apathy and Inaction." An environmental crisis is an emergency concerned with the place in which every human lives - the environment. A people crisis is an emergency with the community that inhabits the world environment. A crisis of population growth is a turning point where the environment can no longer sustain the amounts of people which it contains....   [tags: essays research papers] 1525 words
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Hooligans - Hooligans “Hundreds of English fans have been departed from Belgium after scenes of mass violence in Belgian cities and football authorities have threatened to expel the English team from the competition if there is another outbreak of the English Disease” This was an article dated 20 June 2000 written by an English journalist. It is obvious from this article that world is facing a great problem nowadays. Actually it would be wrong to use the term ‘nowadays’ because the ‘English Disease’ namely hooliganism have been a problem for many centuries....   [tags: Hooliganism Football Sports Athletics Essays]
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Implications of Migration for Pro-poor Agricultural Growth - differences etc. all of which influence migration patterns and remittance utilisation. Methods musttherefore be broadened to include more qualitative techniques and case studies. 2. Integrate migration and commuting into PRSPs, CASs, National Plans At present most key policy documents related to rural development, agriculture and povertyreduction pay little or no attention to migration. These should be reviewed where possible to integrate migration and commuting concerns. There needs to be a greater recognition of thecontribution of current and future mobility to development and poverty reduction....   [tags: essays research papers] 2188 words
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Mass Production - Mass Production Mass production is the manufacture of products of uniform quality in large quantities using a standardised mechanical process or assembly line. After a short post-war depression, the American economy grew rapidly in the early 1920s. By 1926, the standard of living in the USA was the highest it had ever been in the country's history and America was officially the richest nation in the world. Natural resources such as oil were abundant and this gave the USA an advantage that no other country enjoyed at that level....   [tags: Economics] 728 words
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Why Might Economic Growth Not Always Be A Good Thing? - Why Might Economic Growth Not Always Be A Good Thing. When a country undertakes the challenge of economic growth, it does it for a number of reasons, but possibly the most important of these is to satisfy its population. At the end of the Second World War, South Korea wanted to grow economically in order to escape their predominantly farming lifestyles and to experience all of the benefits of consumerism. But instead what South Koreaand many other developing economies find themselves left with is far from their idealistic dreams....   [tags: Economics] 739 words
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HIV/AIDS - With reference to one animal or human disease, explain why its economic consequences can vary spatially. Introduction There are many diseases, which produce economic consequences and which can vary in their effect depending on location. Some are Tuberculosis (TB), Malaria, Ebola Virus and AIDs. Throughout this report I am going to focus on the AIDs virus. HIV is the Human immunodeficiency virus, and AIDs is the Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, which it causes. HIV is a slow retrovirus, which means that not only does it take months to show any symptoms and years to develop fully....   [tags: HIV, AIDS, Health] 1969 words
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Use of Language to Portray 19th Century London Society in Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens - Use of Language to Portray 19th Century London Society in Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens The world's most popular author and novelist who belonged to the Victorian era requires no introduction. Charles Dickens is the man behind great novels like, 'Oliver Twist,' 'Hard Times,' 'Great Expectations,' and many other fascinating and insightful novels that are considered, and quite rightly so, works of true genius. The man, himself was a worker in a blacking factory during his childhood. His father was unable to pay off the family debts so young Dickens was left without a proper education and so spent his childhood and most of his youth in poverty....   [tags: English Literature Oliver Twist] 7189 words
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Far From the Madding Crowd - Close study of a passage from chapter 46: The Gurgoyle Chapter 47 of "Far From the Madding Crowd" is written in a dramatic and sensationalist style, similar to the popular gothic novels of the time. The language and literary techniques used are closely related to this central theme of the passage. Hardy's novel was serialised there is a build up to the final climatic chapter of each series. This explains the increase in tension shown by the horrific description of the gargoyle and the increasing velocity of the "liquid parabola" it spouts into Fanny's grave....   [tags: English Literature] 1407 words
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Level of Development within the Dominican Republic - 1.0 Introduction The following report examines the extent of development within the Dominican Republic in relation to economic, social and political development. It shall also examine some of the problems that are preventing further development within the Dominican Republic. 1.1 Location The Dominican Republic is located in the Caribbean, between Cuba and Puerto Rico on the island of Hispaniola, which it shares with Haiti to the west. With an extension of 48,442 square kilometres, the Dominican Republic is the second largest country in the Antilles....   [tags: World Cultures] 4785 words
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Discuss Work & Negative Views about It. What Are the Qualities of Satisfying Work? - To discuss work, one must first of all try to define work. Once one starts to think about this definition however, one finds that there are as many definitions of work as there are people. Experts such as sociologists have been trying to reach a definite answer, yet they can never agree between them. Although it is accepted that work is that time which is not leisure, one is then confounded with trying to find a definition for leisure. Stanley Parker reached a compromise by dividing our time in five sections, merging from pure work to pure leisure....   [tags: Sociology] 740 words
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Global Politics - Global Politics The study of international or rather global politics, seeks to provide an account of politics in the broadest domain. The domain of international politics in the twenty-first century is characterised by the increasing number of actors pursuing common and personal interests. It is largely due to the globalised, interdependent nature of the current international political environment that the concepts of sovereignty and power deserve further evaluation. The exercise of authority and power are facts as old as time, throughout the ages men have tried to explain and understand how and why political authority is organised....   [tags: Papers] 6683 words
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Eighty-Six Years of Change in St.Michael's Ward, Sunderland - Eighty-Six Years of Change in St.Michael's Ward, Sunderland For this assignment I am going to cover 86 years of change in this locality (St. Michaels Ward, Sunderland), 1855, 1897 and 1941. Maps show a number of industries, businesses and homes have remained the same. Maps A and B show the most change, from a rural area to an urbanised area, from maps B to C there's even more urbanisation. In 1855, farming was the main industry, using most of the land. Farming was the main industry because st Michael's ward was a rural area and it had enclosed fields....   [tags: Papers] 1590 words
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Late 19th Century Law and Order - Late 19th Century Law and Order Thick green smog hung in the air and filth ran in the streets. 19th century London was not a nice place to live. Crime was on the up with burglaries, drunkenness and assault being just some of the crimes committed. Women got a rough deal. There was no work available to them so many women turned to prostitution and alcoholism. Surprisingly enough, however, the percentages of violent deaths was very low, with around 15 murders, and 50 cases of manslaughter a year....   [tags: Papers] 567 words
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What England Looked like Between 1750 and 1900 - What England Looked like Between 1750 and 1900 In England between 1750-1900 the population rose quite noticeably. This is shown in the graph below: [IMAGE] There are many reasons for the rise. One of the reasons is that working as well as living conditions started improving. Numerous amounts of Health Act Services were passed which improved conditions. Slowly people started realising the fact that they were living in such poor conditions. People became more aware of diseases and so streets were much cleaner, houses were better and public toilets were eliminated....   [tags: Papers] 1730 words
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