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Your search returned over 400 essays for "stanza"
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Stanza Critical Analysis - Stanza 1129: Being completely honest with one another is will unite as all, and make for a better society in the long run. You can’t be honest with yourself or others if don’t tell the whole truth. If you don’t do the right thing, it will eventually come back at you. Lying and being selfish is a poison to society that will erode its values. As the truth gradually comes out mother nature becomes aligned (the lightning ceases). Mankind’s actions are directly correlated with nature. How can a society be democratic and civil if everyone is lying to one another....   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 1436 words
(4.1 pages)
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Simplicity in Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost - "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is a regarded as one of Robert Frost’s best pieces of work. However at a first glance, one typically overlooks the poetic finery of Robert Frost’s work. He embeds ambiguous meanings that allow the reader to take a dual interpretation of the text. The iambic tetrameter along with the simplicity of the poem conceals the actual meaningfulness. While creating a deeper meaning Frost also provides a perspective that gives off a remote and solitude feeling. The poem highlights the evening of a man who pauses to take a look at the beautiful scenery lying ahead of his long journey....   [tags: poem, struggles, stanza, life]
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913 words
(2.6 pages)
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Sir Gawain And The Green Knight: Stanza 74 - In stanza 74, fit III, the lady of the castle offers a magical, green girdle to Sir Gawain and explains to him that the wearer of this corset "cannot be killed by any cunning on earth." Sir Gawain, amidst an ethical dilemma, accepts the gift and chooses to conceal it from Lord Bertilak. This passage contains three of the main themes of the story – the inner and outer conflicts between Sir Gawain’s ethics and desire to live, and the test of religion. When Sir Gawain is offered the girdle, his knightly principles are questioned....   [tags: essays research papers] 1329 words
(3.8 pages)
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Keats and the Senses of Being: Ode on a Grecian Urn (Stanza V) - Keats and the Senses of Being: "Ode on a Grecian Urn" (Stanza V) ABSTRACT: With its focus on the pathos of permanence versus temporality as human aporia and on the function — the Werksein — of the work of art genuinely encountered, John Keats’s Ode on a Grecian Urn is a particularly compelling subject for philosophical analysis. The major explications of this most contentiously debated ode in the language have largely focused, however, on various combinations of the poem’s stylistic, structural, linguistic, psychological, aesthetic, historical, symbolic, and intellectual-biographical elements....   [tags: Keats Poem Ode Essays]
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3370 words
(9.6 pages)
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Comparison of the Two Versions of the Last Stanza in London By William Blake - London, by William Blake, was written in 1794. This poem describes how people within a society react, or don't react, when they are subjected to unethical and immoral socially accepted norms. William Blake wrote an earlier version of the last stanza in London, which he later adjusted. The second version is more effective, and dramatic for the reader. The first change Blake made was to "midnight harlot's curse." He changed this to "midnight streets" (13). The first version, "midnight harlot's curse", pertains more to the evil that results from a harlot's curse....   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 289 words
(0.8 pages)
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Comparing Wordsworth's Ode to Duty and Elegiac Stanzas - Comparing Wordsworth's Ode to Duty and Elegiac Stanzas A past attitude is reverted to and revised in Wordsworth's "Ode to Duty" and "Elegiac Stanzas." Employing geographic metaphors, both celestial and earth-bound, the poems climb over rocky Wordsworthian terrain that details his reconciliation between past and present and implications of the future. Though vastly different stylistically‹"Ode to Duty" utilizes an antiquated verse form and language, while "Elegiac Stanzas" is written in Wordsworth's beloved "language of men"‹and in the internal willfulness on the poet's part to change versus reaction to external stimuli, the poems parallel in their desires for resolution of a disarrayed sou...   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
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1626 words
(4.6 pages)
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An Analysis of the Third and Fourth Stanzas in Poe's Poem The Raven - An Analysis of the Third and Fourth Stanzas in Poe's Poem The Raven These two stanzas start at line 25 of the poem, they are the third and fourth stanzas. The persona has heard a knocking at his door, but no one was there. At this point in the poem, his fear and excitement are increasing as some voice keeps repeating the word "Lenore." It is not clear whether he actually hears some other voice speak the word, or if he just interprets the echo after he himself says it as belonging to someone else....   [tags: Poe Raven Essays] 904 words
(2.6 pages)
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Introduction to Poetry Representation - Poetry is not just words formed into a line and a stanza; each poem is an opportunity to “dance” with the poet to his or her significant song. “Introduction to Poetry” by Billy Collins is a reflection on how readers should read poetry. This poem is about how readers should take the time to understand and explore poetry. In addition, Billy Collins, also, states that readers should not torture poems and ignore the significance each stanza represents, but dissect, enjoy, and appreciate the journey they will take while reading poetry....   [tags: poems, poetry, billy collins, stanzas]
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947 words
(2.7 pages)
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An Analysis of the First Two Stanzas of Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven - An Analysis of the First Two Stanzas of Edgar Allan Poe's The Raven Picture yourself alone one night. You are sitting up in bed, your legs buried underneath your comforter while you read for what seems like the hundredth time that same paragraph from Franklin for your American Literature class, and trying to ignore the storm that is only getting stronger outside. Suddenly, the power goes out, and you only have candlelight to read by. The silence becomes deafening, and you watch the shadows play across the wall....   [tags: Poe Raven Essays] 867 words
(2.5 pages)
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An Analysis of Selected Stanzas From Book II, Canto VII of Spenser’s Faerie Queene 1 - An Analysis of Selected Stanzas From Book II, Canto VII of Spenser’s Faerie Queene 1 I Her face right wondrous faire did seeme to bee That her broad beauties beam great brightness threw Through the dim shade, that all men might it see: Yet was not that same her owne native hew, But wrought by art and counterfetted shew, Thereby more lovers unto her to call; Nath’lesse most heavenly faire in deed and vew She by creation was, till that she did fall; Thenceforth she sought for help, to cloke her crime withall....   [tags: Faerie Queene] 1917 words
(5.5 pages)
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Naming of Parts, by Henry Reed - The Elaborate Use of Poetry Devices In “Naming of Parts” While one way of thought is factual, more literal, another is more reflective and abstract. In Henry Reed’s “Naming of Parts”, Reed uses both approaches to thinking with his speakers, and this allows his poem to include different points of view and tones. The two speakers are evident in different lines of “Naming of Parts”, and when they merge, they have a different meaning than both alone....   [tags: Poetry Devices, Factual, Literal]
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1141 words
(3.3 pages)
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Exploring How Keats Finds Beauty In Death - There is no life without death, and no death without life. Life and death mutually define each other and without one, the other would have no meaning. Keats was an English poet very concerned with death and human mortality. His poems usually deal with his struggle to accept his own mortality and his attempt to flee from reality into a world of immortality. This poem, “To Autumn”, which Keats wrote after observing an autumn evening, is seemingly simplistic and purely descriptive. However, underneath the surface, Keats has finally begun to accept the difficult truth that death is inevitable....   [tags: Poetry Analysis, Poets, Poem] 1193 words
(3.4 pages)
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Keats: A Life Lesson from A Piece of Marble - Time is an ever constant moving aspect of life. It can build one up and tear one down in an instance, for everything revolves around time. In John Keats’s ever famous poem “Ode On A Grecian Urn” Keats ponders over the immortal world painted on the structure and the changing one in which all humans live in. The structure that makes the poem is one of many characteristics, two being rhyme and meter. “Ode On A Grecian Urn” is dominantly iambic pentameter (with ten syllables per line and five feet) which gives the poem a nice flow....   [tags: Literature]
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1643 words
(4.7 pages)
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Explication of Diane Thiels "The Minefield" - Diane Thiel’s poem “The Minefield” is about a man who’s mind has been ravaged by memories of a war in his childhood. She shows that even though the war had been over for years, the memory of it haunted the man in everything that he did. Through a powerful combination of symbols, dark images, and a split chronology, she creates a full picture of a life changed forever by war. In the first stanza, the tone is lighter, describing a scene where two boys are running through towns. The boys race, the faster one being described as a “wild rabbit”....   [tags: essays research papers] 340 words
(1 pages)
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Analyzing The Bells, An Edgar Allen Poe Poem - Edgar Allan Poe's "The Bells" is a poem filled with alliteration, assonance, and rhyme. The musical words capture the reader as they pull him in with their rapid, lyrical flow. It consists of four stanzas, each a bit longer than the preceding one. Each stanza has it's own type of metal bell, representing different stages of human life. The first set of bells that we come across in this piece are the silver bells. These bells represent the first stage of human life: youth. Firstly, the color silver is pure and shiny....   [tags: American Literature, Literature Analysis] 322 words
(0.9 pages)
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Religion and Education in The poem A Different History by Sujata Bhatt - The poem A Different History was written by Sujata Bhatt, and is about how the culture, language and identities of the colonisers have affected India’s values, culture, religion and spirituality. The first stanza focuses on respect for religion and education, and on India’s culture, whereas the second stanza emphasises how the language and the colonisers destroy this culture and values. This poem also focuses on the fact that language plays a crucial part in establishing national identity, linking people of the same nation together through common history, and a shared culture (which language is a part of)....   [tags: indian culture, language, identities]
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1364 words
(3.9 pages)
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Unique Senses of Place in Poetry by Edward Thomas and Robert Frost - Both Edward Thomas and Robert Frost explore many poems where they describe a place which would transport the reader to a specific scene that implies that this place is somewhat important to the poet. Edward Thomas’ poem, ‘Adlestrop’ describes where he witnessed a place for only a few moments as his train stopped at a station, named ‘Adlestrop’. Adlestrop is a small rural parish on the eastern border of Gloucestershire, and it is very well-known for its countryside and walks. This poem begins with the line “Yes, I remember Adlestrop”; this leads us to believe that someone may have asked him if he knew this place and also creates a conversational feel of the poem to intrigue the reader to find...   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 1027 words
(2.9 pages)
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Loaded Gun Symbolism Depicted in Emily Dickinson's Poem, 754 - In the beginning of Emily Dickinson’s poem “754,” the narrator immediately compares her life to a weapon, “My Life had stood -- a Loaded Gun --” (754). Usually, when one thinks of a gun, he or she might think of death instead of love. In most cases, when a person owns or has a possession of a gun, that person might use the gun for protection. A gun is an inanimate object that has the potential or power to take the life of a human. From analyzing the poem “754,” the narrator symbolizes a loaded gun, full of potential, full of power, waiting to be in the possession of its owner for protection just as a bride waits to be wedded by her husband....   [tags: 754, poetry] 2006 words
(5.7 pages)
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Role of Works of Art in Ode on a Grecian Urn and Musée des Beaux Arts - While differing in technique and subject matter, John Keats’ “Ode on a Grecian Urn” (1820) and W.H. Auden’s “Musée des Beaux Arts” (1940) demonstrate how using the rhetorical device of Ekphrasis in poetry helps to guide the reader to the central themes and messages of the poem. Both poems confront and explore the works of art differently: while Keats uses the rustic urn (in which scenes and myths are depicted upon it) to confront the nature as well as the limits of the world of art and fantasy; Auden uses Brueghel’s painting, The Fall of Icarus, in his second stanza to help reinforce the speaker’s comments (stated within the first stanza) on the apathy or indifference that seems to be presen...   [tags: ekphrasis, poetry, composition]
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999 words
(2.9 pages)
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Two Similar Poems Written by the Same Author 39 Years Apart - Coleridge wrote two similar poems, “Effusion XXXV” and the revised version, “The Eolian Harp”. His first, written in 1795, was composed thirty-nine years before his revision, which was placed in his Poetical Works. Both poems were written in Somersetshire and continue to speak in the same conversational tone to Sara, his fiancé. While both poems can be considered similar to each other, they each have a different story when read throughout. “Effusion XXXV” has three stanzas and fifty-six lines. It is a conversational poem where Coleridge is speaking to the woman he loves, Sara, who he would marry two months after the creation of the poem....   [tags: poetical work, somersetshire, poem]
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1080 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Second Coming, by Willim Butler Yeats - William Butler Yeats’ “The Second Coming” is one of the famous and well-known poem. It describes an apocalyptic situation in the first stanza while also assuring the readers of the hope of the arrival of a messianic figure in the second. The gloomy, darksome picture that is delineated by Yeats creates a fear in the reader’s mind about the falling worldly conditions as optimistic language later tried to give hope. This feeling of apocalypse came into Yeats’ mind as the world was advancing at a fast speed and he felt it needed to slow down a bit....   [tags: Poetic Analysis, Description]
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502 words
(1.4 pages)
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Analysis of Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening - Analysis of Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening Diction (i.e. choice of vocabulary) The diction of "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening" is extremely simple. None of the vocabulary is difficult or unusual, and most of the most of the words are short and plain, for example 'woods', 'house', 'snow', 'horse'. None of the descriptions, either of the setting, or the horse, is detailed or elaborate: the horse is simply, 'little'; the lake is 'frozen' (but we learn nothing else about it), and the only time more than one adjective is used to described anything is when we are told that the woods are: 'lovely, dark and deep'....   [tags: Papers] 758 words
(2.2 pages)
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Ode on a Grecian Urn - In “Ode on a Grecian Urn” Keats uses the urn as a symbolism he talks about the urn being a human being. The poet speaks of the urn designs that are process in time by the artist which the urn became a beautiful master piece of art that comes alive. The urn is a beautiful ancient object designed with fascinated pictures imprinted on the side. He brings the pictures to life as he goes into a fantasy world thinking of lovers that are frozen in time. He thinks of a relationship the lovers could have and what if they pursue their love interest....   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 476 words
(1.4 pages)
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Love As a Theme In a Poem - Love is one of the main sources that move the world, and poetry is not an exception, this shows completely the feelings of someone. In “Litany” written by Billy Collins, “Love Poem” by John Frederick Nims, “Song” by John Donne, “Love” by Matthew Dickman and “Last Night” by Sharon Olds navigate around the same theme. Nevertheless, they differ in formats and figurative language that would be compared. For this reason, the rhetoric figures used in the poems will conduct us to understand the insights thought of the authors and the arguments they want to support....   [tags: poetry, Litany, Love Poem, Song, Last Night]
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892 words
(2.5 pages)
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Pro War Attitude Conveyed in Robert Bridges' Poem Wake Up, England - In the poem “Wake Up, England” by Robert Bridges, the speaker expresses his pro-war attitude and urges his English citizens to support the war by playing with our fears, duty and patriotism. In stanza one and two, the speaker asks the citizens to stand up for England because now is not a time for happiness. This is shown when, ‘Thou peace-maker, fight/Stand, England, for honor.’ (Line 2-3); meaning that the speaker is wanting the citizens of England to fight, either physically in the war or supporting it....   [tags: Poetry, Poem Analysis] 666 words
(1.9 pages)
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Purpose of Life: Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night by Dylan Thomas - Dylan Thomas’ poem “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” focuses on the purpose of life. Dylan Thomas suggests that the ultimate consequences an individual faces are those that result from the effortless acceptance of giving into death which, in turn, forces him to fight it rather than mutually accepting its fate. The poet conveys this message through the articulate structure of the poem, by the use of poetic conventions and through the perspective of four types of men who journey through life....   [tags: poem, true purpose of life]
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1148 words
(3.3 pages)
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Critique of William Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 - Critique of William Shakespeare's Sonnet 138 In “Sonnet 138” also known as “When My Love Swears that she is Made of Truth” is a sonnet written by William Shakespeare, has many examples of literary elements such as personification and various types of rhyme. In “Sonnet 138” the author writes the sonnet in iambic pentameter and writes in an ABAB, CDCD, EFEF, GG rhyme scheme. The narrator also includes examples of connotation and denotation to help change the meaning of the poem. Throughout the sonnet the author obviously is an older man than the younger woman that he is dating....   [tags: Shakespeare, Poetry Analysis] 700 words
(2 pages)
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The Levels of Complexity in “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” - “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” by Robert Frost, on the surface appears to be a straightforward poem illustrating the monologue of a tired traveler passing by the woods on a winter evening who captures the scenery of his journey and comes to a realization that he has quite a bit of traveling ahead of him before he can rest. The simplicity of this poem is apparent, but at closer inspection there is vast complexity entailed in the wording of Frost’s poem. His words are of two minds in which Frost uses artless objects to connote implied metaphors and uses these objects for further making comparisons throughout the piece....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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1795 words
(5.1 pages)
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Analysis of Baudelaire’s The Firing Range and the Graveyard - ... The other two stanzas switch over to a darker mood, more specifically the last stanza, and turning into a realization of how the world is and what the world has in store; death. The shift from a happy stanza to a fearful, scared stanza, creates progression through the poem, just as if we were enjoying a happy meal with family and friends, then suddenly something happens and the mood becomes dreary, the change in mood can progress the reader’s imagination. The last stanza, the most important of the poem and the ending, brings about another character, bringing about wisdom and knowledge from a deceased person, a soul or if interpreted differently, the voice could be the narrator....   [tags: Firing Range and the Cemetery]
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1440 words
(4.1 pages)
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To His coy mistress by Andrew Marvell - In "To His Coy Mistress," Andrew Marvell presents a speaker who appeals to his love through persuasion. The speaker uses an appeal to reason as his main tool, but he also appeals to his mistress through emotion and character to garner a response. Each stanza utilizes a different method of appeal that relies on diction and punctuation. In the first stanza, the speaker appeals to character, in the second emotion, and in the third reason. By using different methods of appeal, the speaker hopes to win his mistress' love....   [tags: essays research papers] 1141 words
(3.3 pages)
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Formalistic Approach Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) - Formalistic Approach Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat (Favourite) In Thomas Gray's poem "Ode on the Death of a Favorite Cat," we find many examples of the Formalistic Approach. In this poem, we find numerous examples of alliteration, rhyme scheme, puns, and creative word choice. This poem is very joyful and fun to read because the author is very creative in his choice of words and phrases. In the first stanza, we figure out where this event is taking place or in other words, we find out the setting....   [tags: Ode to the Death of a Favorite Cat Essays] 698 words
(2 pages)
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Hymn to Intellectual Beauty - Let’s face it. In our complicated lives who really cares about nature and beauty. Marred by the pressures of responsibilities and expectations, most of us never stop and smell the roses nor do we stop and think about how simply wonderful the world is. However, Percy Shelley does. In his “Hymn to Intellectual Beauty,” Shelley reflects upon the awesome power of beauty and his relation to it as a humble servant, one who cherishes it and respects it but will never hoard and control it. Projected in a rhyme scheme of ABBAACCADDEE for seven stanzas, Shelley explores the character of beauty, the role of beauty, and his relation to the spirit of beauty....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Percy Shelley] 1913 words
(5.5 pages)
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The Black Lace Fan my Mother Gave me - The Black Lace Fan my Mother Gave me Commentary on “The Black Lace Fan my Mother Gave me” by Eavan Bolland The Black Lace Fan my Mother Gave me by Eavan Bolland reflects on the last of a love life of a couple during pre-war Paris using a symbol, a ‘Black Lace Fan’. Bolland achieves this through the use of weather imagery, the changing of his tense from past to present, and using literary features such as simile, metaphor, personification and repetition. In the first stanza of the poem, Bolland disconcerts the reader by using the diction “it” twice, though representing different things....   [tags: English Literature] 1071 words
(3.1 pages)
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Analysis of John Donne's Poem, The Flea - The Flea John Donne’s poems are similar in their content. They usually point out at same topics like love, lust, sex and religion; only they are dissimilar in the feelings they express. These subjects reflect the different stages of his life: the lust of his youth, the love of his married middle age, and the piety of the latter part of his life. His poem,’ The Flea’ represents the restless feeling of lust during his youthful days but it comes together with a true respect for women through the metaphysical conceit of the flea as a church in the rhythm of the sexual act....   [tags: Poetry, Poem Analysis] 1411 words
(4 pages)
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An Analysis of Sunday Morning - An Analysis of Wallace Stevens' Sunday Morning         “Sunday Morning” by Wallace Stevens is a poem about a woman having a late breakfast and thinking about the purpose of religion. Stevens wants the readers to ask themselves the questions that the woman asks, and to explore their feelings towards Christianity. He also wants to spark an awareness of nature. The first stanza asks the first tentative questions before launching into a racy debate in the later stanzas.           Stevens uses stanza I to set the scene for the rest of the poem....   [tags: Sunday Morning]
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1349 words
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Growing Up in McAuliffe's 'Black Box' - Transition from childhood to adulthood is a major element in our lives and to many individuals this can be a daunting experience. The poem ‘Black Box’, by John McAuliffe, portrays this change from the perspective of an individual who is resistant to the development from childhood to maturity. This essay will critically examine the way this interpretation is formed by following the model established by I.A.Richards and critics of the New School. The aim of this model is to construct an understanding of a text “by isolating the text from history and context.” (Barry, 2009, p.15) In terms of poetry, the model focuses on the way literary techniques, structure and form contribute to the meaning o...   [tags: Literature]
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1856 words
(5.3 pages)
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Explication of Wallace Stevens' Snowman - Wallace Stevens explores the perception of a January winter scene in his poem “The Snow Man.” The poem occurs over the space of five unrhymed stanzas, three lines each, and is contained to a single, deceptively simple sentence. Within this sentence, semicolons split up the viewer’s actions as the speaker expands on the necessities of the scenery. Rather than that which is perceived, it is the act of perception on which the poem focuses, and passive verbs predominantly characterize this central action, imposing conditions on the viewer and the winter scene which is viewed....   [tags: The Snoeman, Poetic Analysis] 1415 words
(4 pages)
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The Mother by Gwendolyn Brooks - In a world in which abortion is considered either a woman's right or a sin against God, the poem "The Mother" by Gwendolyn Brooks gives a voice to a mother lamenting her aborted children through three stanzas in which a warning is given to mothers, an admission of guilt is made, and an apology to the dead is given. The poet-speaker, the mother, as part of her memory addresses the children that she "got that [she] did not get" (2). The shift in voice from stanza to stanza allows Brooks to capture the grief associated with an abortion by not condemning her actions, nor excusing them; she merely grieves for what might have been....   [tags: Poem Poetry Abortion] 1704 words
(4.9 pages)
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One Art, by Elizabeth Bishop - The concept of loss is a notable theme in poetry, whether its about love, beauty or even life, many poets tend to render it. Such a theme is illuminated upon by Elizabeth Bishop, a distinguished 20th century American poet, who, unlike other poets of her time, usually did not write about personal details of her life in her poems. However the poem One Art can arguably be a contradiction to this fact; for Bishop expressed emotions of losing her dear friend in the voice of the speaker through out the poem....   [tags: Thematic Analysis, Loss] 1153 words
(3.3 pages)
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John Keats' Fear That He Might Cease to Be - During his last years, Keats ponders about what it would mean to die. He translates this into fears of what he hasn’t yet accomplished and would like to have time to do. This aspect of time is emphasised with the use of the word “when” at the start of the first three quatrains which is also used in Shakespearean Sonnets. The heading, “When I have fears that I may cease to be” demonstrates Keats’ belief, or rather, lack of belief in the idea of an afterlife. In the first quatrain of the poem Keats describes his fertile imagination, yearning to have “glean’d my teeming brain” before it is too late, the image of abundance is instilled with the words “high- piled” and “rich.” The paradox of a fi...   [tags: John Keats, poetry,] 607 words
(1.7 pages)
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Women’s Writings in Twentieth Century British Malaya - As I began doing research on the pantoum I quickly noticed the uniqueness of this form when compared to others. Unlike many others, the pantoum is a form that is greatly influenced by the culture in which it originated from. In this essay, I will be discussing several qualities that make the pantoum such a unique poetic form. By examining both the history of the form and the way in which it has evolved over time, we can better understand the impact that this form has on art of poetry. The pantoum, originally called a “pantun,” originated in Malaysia during the Fifteenth Century....   [tags: uniqueness, culture, poetry, Malay language]
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974 words
(2.8 pages)
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Reading Between the Lines - William Blake’s poem “The Lamb” is a simplistic poem until you read deeper into it and find a powerful and uplifting religious message about creation. Blake is able to draw people into his poem by having a young innocent child as the speaker, asking rhetorical questions to a lamb. Although he also throws irony into the second stanza by having the young child answer his own questions, asked in the first stanza. The poem has a tone so sweet and soft that it is not offensive in any means and is not affected by cynicism of the older generations....   [tags: Poetry Analysis]
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927 words
(2.6 pages)
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Analysis of Ralegh's Nature, that washed her hands in milk - Analysis of Ralegh's "Nature, that washed her hands in milk" Nature, that washed her hands in milk” can be divided structurally into two halves; the first three stanzas constitute the first half, and the last three stanzas make up the second half. Each stanza in the first half corresponds to a stanza in the second half. The first stanza describes the temperament of Nature, who is, above all, creative. This first stanza of the first half corresponds to stanza four, the first stanza in the second half of the poem....   [tags: Ralegh Nature Washed Milk Poetry Essays] 846 words
(2.4 pages)
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The Poetry of William Blake - William Blake is considered one of the greatest poets of British history due to his recognizable talent and unique style of writing and illustrating. As a young boy, Blake began having visions that he claimed were the source of his inspiration. His parents did all they could to nurture his “gift” and made sure he retained it throughout his life. His imagination definitely stayed with him as he grew up and wrote Songs of Innocence. This series of poems included Blake’s favorite themes of the destiny of the human spirit and the possibility of renewing our perceptions....   [tags: poetry, william blake] 601 words
(1.7 pages)
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"All must love the human form" - William Blake uses his two compilations of poems, The Songs of Innocence (1789) and The Songs of Experience (1794) to present two opposing pictures of human divinity and human corruption in his two poems “The Divine Image” and “A Divine Image.” In these two poems Blake uses several techniques and literary devices to transmit his thoughts on the ideal and more realistic views of human nature. William Blake was born in 1757 and died in 1827 after living a very long, happy, and stable life; as opposed to many of the other important Romantic poets of his time....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]
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1050 words
(3 pages)
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An Explication of Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night - An Explication of Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night In this poem Thomas makes a very personal appeal to his father as the latter approaches death. He pleads with him not just to surrender to death but to fight death as long as possible. His plea also becomes universal as Thomas addresses also all other people approaching death, not to accept death as inevitable, but rather to fight against dying. Whether men have been strong or weak throughout their lives, they should still make a stand at the end....   [tags: Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night] 789 words
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The Fall of the House of Usher - In the story “The Fall of the House of Usher” by Edgar Allen Poe, the character Roderick Usher is the last male member of the Usher family. The Usher family has a nearly impeccable direct line of descent as stated in paragraph 3 of the story. Roderick has only one living relative, his sister Madeline. This means that the Usher family is in jeopardy of disappearing because neither Roderick nor his sister has any children. Therefore there is a possibility of incest between Roderick and Madeline. However this could result in many difficulties and problems for the potential children and possibly on the consciences of Roderick and Madeline....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Edgar Allen Poe] 1058 words
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Edgar Allen Poe’s Annabel Lee: Never a Happily Ever After - Fairy tales are usually associated with elegant dresses, fancy shoes, and a happily ever after for the protagonists, presenting the tale itself as if it is too good to be true, because it is. In reality people cannot have a fairy tale ending because the majority of the population has difficulty paying bills, providing for their families, and, in many cases, relationships fail. Edgar Allen Poe’s “Annabel Lee” shows readers exactly that: All Fairy Tales must be brought to an end and there is nothing that can stop this....   [tags: poem, poetry, poetry analysis] 625 words
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Overview of Dulce et Decorum Est - “Dulce et Decorum Est” (1918), a poem by Wilfred Owen, provides readers with a view of war contrary to the romanticized portrayals common during the early 20th century. Owen, born in 1893, died fighting in World War I in 1918. This British writer amplified the basic theme of the poem by beginning the poem in iambic pentameter; later, he diverged from the poetic form to submerge the reader into the chaotic and desperate atmosphere of the poem. The author’s main idea reflects the haunting tragedy and irony of war in a passionate plea to those who appeal to the youth with glorified ideas of battle....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]
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Slough by Sir John Betjeman - Sir John Betjeman’s poem, Slough, opens with a wonderful, dramatic stanza. There is huge tension between the ideas of cows grazing and the idea of death. Even in the opening line there is conflict ‘friendly bombs’ is a contradiction in terms, as bombs are almost never thought of as friendly, and Betjeman’s use of this defines what a bad place. Another tool Betjeman employs is rhythm; the stanza is at a steady, predefined pace until the last line where the rhythm is broken with the word ‘Death’, which gives a powerful image of Slough....   [tags: Poems Poetry Analysis] 452 words
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Use of Language and Structure to Illustrate the Journey of Death in Dickinson's Poem, Because I Could Not Stop For Death - Emily Dickinson had unconventional views, which may explain the disconcertingly charming way in which she describes death in this poem. She presents the arrival of "Death" as a friend, or even a bridegroom, to escort the narrator in a leisurely manner towards her tomb. An awareness of immortality is conveyed throughout the poem by various literary techniques. The poem consists of six quatrains with no regular rhyme pattern, except for an occasional abcb half-rhyme. The numerous internal rhymes, and the alliteration however, creates a smooth and leisurely pace....   [tags: literary techniques, poetry] 831 words
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Struggles of the Cultural Revolution in Bei Dao's "Notes from the City of the Sun" - ... In this stanza, the speaker describes the dawning of a new day; however at the same time, the speaker is sarcastically referring to the dawning of a new day in the life under the communist rule of Mao Zedong. A repeat of the sun imagery occurs in the seventh stanza, describing art as a shattered mirror reflecting “a million scintillating suns” (Dao 21). The relation of art to a shattered mirror refers to the artists and the intellectuals who suffered the most under the Cultural Revolution. Ma states that this stanza represents the guaranteed survival of art because, although shattered, “art still glittered in its splintered dying pieces” (85)....   [tags: Chinese poetry]
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Love in Andrew Marvell in To His Coy Mistress and John Donne's The Sunne Rising - Love in Andrew Marvell in To His Coy Mistress and John Donne's The Sunne Rising These two poems, "To His Coy Mistress" and "The Sunne Rising" are similar poems, they are both metaphysical (metaphysical means more than physical) poems written around Shakespeare's time. The main theme of these poems is the same; it is romance and the love of a woman. Yet the two poets have very different opinions on these two things. Within both poems are arguments, in "To His Coy Mistress" it is with the woman and in "The Sunne Rising" it is with the sun....   [tags: Papers] 1596 words
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Comparison of The Little Boy Lost and The Little Boy Found - Comparison of The Little Boy Lost and The Little Boy Found The Little Boy Lost and The Little Boy Found are two poems that are quite different to each other, in the aspect of language used, themes and ideas, and imagery. I shall look at each poem in detail in this essay, along with the different ideas that I get from them. In The Little Boy Lost, the first stanza of the poem gives the reader images of a father ignoring, possibly abandoning his son and walking away from him. This stanza is written in first person, to show us how confused the boy is....   [tags: English Literature] 443 words
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Marvel to His Mistress: Carpe Diem! - Marvell to His Mistress: Carpe Diem. In Andrew Marvell's poem "To His Coy Mistress," he's arguing for affection. The object of the speaker's desire wants to wait and take the relationship slow, while the speaker pushes for instant gratification. This persuasive poem makes the point that time waits for no one and it's foolish for two lovers to postpone a physical relationship. Marvell's piece is structured as a poem but flows as a classical argument. He uses the three stanzas to address the issues of time, love, and sex....   [tags: Poetry] 725 words
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Analysis of Heaney's Mid-Term Break - Reading a story or poem about death is usually sad and overtly predictable.  However, Seamus Heaney inverts this mundane typicality to deliver a poem shrouded in mystery.  The main aspects of Heaney's poem  Mid-Term Break  are the plot development and how the diction sets the somber tone that slowly reveals the mystery.     One technique Heaney uses is diction, which aids in plot development.  In the first stanza he uses words that draw out the stanza and make it seem to last a long time.  In the first line the use of the word  all  drags out the line.  The sense of time is apparent in this first stanza.  The second line,  Counting bells knelling classes to a close,  uses words that describe...   [tags: Heaney Mid-Term Break Poem Poetry Essays] 1053 words
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Death of Naturalist by Seamus Heaney - Death of Naturalist by Seamus Heaney The poem "Death of Naturalist" was written by a well known Irish poet Seamus Heaney. The title "Death of a Naturalist" gives us a sense of loss. The opening line "All year the flax-dam festered in the heart" gives us specific detail like in Blackberry picking. The alliteration in the first line such as flax-dom and festered links in with the second stanza. Flax-dom is an onomatopoeia and festered has association of sickness and decay. It contrasts with the happy description in the first stanza when he recalls collecting the frogspawn....   [tags: Death of Naturalist Seamus Heaney Essays] 664 words
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The Abortion Experience - Many conditions such as the ability to conceive, carry a child, and lifestyle, are often used as aspects that qualify what it is to be a parent. A controversial condition is a woman’s control over her body and reproductive system. The most direct control a woman can have is in the choice to experience or abort a pregnancy. While the dichotomous mentality surrounding abortion has always been at the forefront of social controversy, the “gray area” between the two extremes of pro life and pro choice is often neglected....   [tags: Informative Essay]
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An Analysis of Emily Dickinson's Poem, Because I Could Not Stop for Death - In the poem “Because I could not stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson refers to death as a gentlemen who unexpectedly visits Dickinson to take her on a journey “towards eternity” (I. 24). It is very ironic that she considers death as a gentleman, but as we all know it is the total opposite. On the second stanza they both start the slow and peaceful journey. “We slowly drove, he knew no haste” (I. 5). We can see the tranquility of the scene in which they are. Dickinson here understands the seriousness of the situation in which she is, and she forgets about everything....   [tags: Poem Analysis, Poetry] 620 words
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Doubting Religion in Wallace Stevens' Sunday Morning - Doubting Religion in Wallace Stevens' Sunday Morning Voice is an integral part of Wallace Stevens' "Sunday Morning." The voice of the poem is not the woman's, but that of an outside narrator who seems to give words to the feelings that the woman experiences. The dramatic situation is created during the first stanza. The woman, still in her peignoir, is taking "late coffee and oranges in a sunny chair" on a bright Sunday morning instead of attending church. The quiet of the scene is evident, and the "holy hush" provides the woman with the perfect environment for introspection....   [tags: Poem Poetic Essays] 902 words
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The Literary Techniques Used to Evoke the World of Senses in Keats Odes - Imagery is a primary literary technique a poet uses to capture the readers or listeners senses. We gain comprehension of the world through the use of our sense. Therefore, how the reader perceives a poem is always the most important aspect every poet considers whilst writhing. The images of a poem have the ability to appeal of each of our senses, taste, smell, touch, hearing and sight can all be heightened by certain aspects of poetry. The imagery of a poem has the ability to transport us into a different place or time, allowing the reader to experience new observations....   [tags: Literary Analysis ] 1576 words
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Persuasive Techniques Used in Poetry - Persuasive Techniques Used in Poetry Compare the persuasive techniques used in the poems. Say which poems you feel are the most effective and Why. Persuading poets have been writing poems on love, lust and nature since the beginning of time. The 7 poems that are analysed here range from the 16th-19th centuries. These poems are all written by men arguing and persuading the effects of love. In “To virgins”, it appears that Robert Herrick uses small amounts of natural imagery to persuade virgins and to stress the fast passing of time....   [tags: Poetry Poems Writing Literature Essays] 2188 words
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Joy and Darkness in William Blake’s ‘The Chimney Sweeper’ - Both William Blake’s ‘The Chimney Sweeper’ come from his book ‘Songs of Innocence and Experience. He first wrote ‘ Songs of Innocence’, published in 1789 followed by ‘ Songs of Experience’ in 1794. Though those two books were put together as one, there is a huge difference between the two: Songs of Innocence is written in a joyful way, whereas Songs of Experience is a darker and less joyful book. The first Chimney Sweeper poem was to be found in the Songs of Innocence. The poem talks about little children having to work as chimney sweepers....   [tags: Poetry Analysis] 1013 words
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Response to Langston Hughes' Poem I, too, sing America - Hughes, Langston. “I Too. Sing America.” New York Times 5 Jan 2010: A16 Online. [Summary] This poem is about the struggle of a working minority, a black man, suffering the hardship of unfair labor. Langston Hughes gives out such a real and positive impact on the read, too which makes them think about how they can hope for the future. ' But I laugh, And eat well, And grow strong ' This doesn't only suggest that he is getting stronger physically but also mentally which states that he doesn't take the slavery personal and hopes for tomorrow and he knows that tomorrow will...   [tags: poetry, poem analysis] 745 words
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Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats - Ode on a Grecian Urn by John Keats Summary In the first stanza, the speaker, standing before an ancient Grecian urn, addresses the urn, preoccupied with its depiction of pictures frozen in time. It is the "still unravish'd bride of quietness," the "foster-child of silence and slow time." He also describes the urn as a "historian," which can tell a story. He wonders about the figures on the side of the urn, and asks what legend they depict, and where they are from. He looks at a picture that seems to depict a group of men pursuing a group of women, and wonders what their story could be: "What mad pursuit....   [tags: Ode Grecian Urn John Keats Essays] 1531 words
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Death in Emily Dickinson's Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died - Death in Emily Dickinson's Because I Could Not Stop for Death and I Heard a Fly Buzz When I Died Emily Dickinson's two poems, "Because I Could Not Stop For Death" and "I Heard A Fly Buzz-When I Died," revolve around one central theme, death. Though the two do centralize around the theme of death they both have slightly different messages or beliefs about what is to come after death. By discussing both of the poems and interpreting their meanings, the reader can gain a fuller understanding of the message Dickinson is trying to send to her audience and a greater feel for what may lie ahead in the afterlife....   [tags: Emily Dickinson Death Dying Literature Essays] 962 words
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To Seize the Day - Kris Allen, a former winner of American Idol, summarizes the entire carpe diem theme in his song “Live Like We’re Dying,” “We only 86,400 seconds in a day to, to turn it all around or throw it all away… ” Andrew Marvell’s poem “To His Coy Mistress” centers on the carpe diem theme. Marvell acknowledges life’s briefness and how time flashes before ones eyes. In “To His Coy Mistress,” Marvell attempts to persuade his lover to elope and run away with him. This poem seems quite simple; Andrew Marvell attempts to expedite the brevity of life and the swiftness of time to seduce his mistress....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ] 922 words
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Gray's “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” - “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” is a poem composed by Thomas Gray over a period of ten years. Beginning shortly after the death of his close friend Richard West in 1742, “Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard” was first published in 1751. This poem’s use of dubbal entendre may lead the intended audience away from the overall theme of death, mourning, loss, despair and sadness; however, this poem clearly uses several literary devices to convey the author’s feelings toward the death of his friend Richard West, his beloved mother, aunt and those fallen soldiers of the Civil War....   [tags: Literature]
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Love Song and September by Ted Hughes - “What happens in the heart simply happens” is a famous quote from Ted Hughes. Ted Hughes was a man of love. Hughes was known for many of his children books and famous poems. Hughes is also greatly known for holding the title of British Poet Laureate from 1984 until his death. Love was an important aspect of Ted Hughes life and two poems: Love Song and September. Ted Hughes was born August 17, 1930 in Yorkshire, England. His parents were Edith Hughes and William Henry. His father was a carpenter....   [tags: biography, children books, poems]
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Compare and contrast Childhood by John Clare and Follower by - Compare and contrast Childhood by John Clare and Follower by Seamus Heaney. John Clare was born in 1793 and died in 1864. He was born in the countryside and remained a countryman all his life. He was a son of a labourer, his mother was illiterate and his father could barely read or write. His family were desperately poor and he never travelled far from home. His poem Childhood is autobiographical and reminiscent on his childhood memories. His first anthology was called "Poems descriptive of rural life and scenery" and it was very well received but later anthologies weren't as enthusiastically received....   [tags: English Literature] 1450 words
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John Lennon and Paul McCartney's Eleanor Rigby - John Lennon and Paul McCartney's Eleanor Rigby Loneliness is a reoccurring theme in all types of literature. “Eleanor Rigby,'; by John Lennon and Paul McCartney is a fine example of the theme of loneliness in poetry. The two characters in "Eleanor Rigby" are compared by their loneliness through the extensive use of symbols.      The poem begins with the refrain, "Ah, look at all the lonely people." The same refrain is used to end the poem, making a complete circle. This creates, for the reader, a sense of loneliness about the poem as a whole....   [tags: Poetry Poetic Poet Poem Essays] 391 words
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Types of Love in One Flesh, To His Coy Mistress and Our Love Now - Types of Love in One Flesh, To His Coy Mistress and Our Love Now One of the poems I have chosen is 'One Flesh'. It is written in the first person but describes the parent's of the writer so all but the last line is in the third person. In stanza 1 he holds a book as they lie in two separate beds, reading with the light on, this is an unromantic activity. There is a feeling of waiting as if what happened before has gone away and they need something new. Stanza 2 shows something left over from a past explosion, they do not need physical contact....   [tags: Papers] 1074 words
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Analysis of The Mother by Gwendolyn Brooks - Analysis of The Mother by Gwendolyn Brooks The poem “The Mother” by Gwendolyn Brooks was written in 1945. Gwendolyn Brooks was the first child of David and Keziah Brooks. She was born on June 7, 1917 in Topeka, Kansas. Brooks wrote her first poem when she was 13 years old and was published in the children’s. Moreover she was the first black author to win the Pulitzer prize. magazine. In 1938 she was married to Henry Blakely and had two children. After a long battle of cancer Brooks died in December 3, 2000....   [tags: Poetry Analysis, The Mother, Gwendolyn Brooks] 429 words
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Essay on Technical Qualities, Symbolism, and Imagery of Dover Beach - Technical Qualities, Symbolism, and Imagery of "Dover Beach" In "Dover Beach," Matthew Arnold creates a dramatic monologue of the Victorian Era that shows how perceptions can be misleading. Arnold conveys the theme of "Dover Beach" through three essential developments: the technical qualities of the poem itself, symbolism, and imagery. The theme of illusion versus reality in "Dover Beach" reflects the speaker's awareness of the incompatibility between what is perceived and what truly is real....   [tags: Arnold Dover Beach Essays]
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Modernism and Dylan Thomas - The early to mid 1900s was a time of great and rapid change, known as Modernism. The period demonstrated drastic deviations in “viewing and interacting with the world” (“Modernism”-Literature Periods and Movements). This cultural movement exhibited the breaking away from Victorian morals. Some of the Victorian morals that Modernism rejected were the belief in a single way at viewing the world, the idea that every person has a certain role in life, and the division of society into groups: “civilized” and “savage”....   [tags: victorian morals, consciousness and repetition]
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John Keats' To Autumn - John Keats' "To Autumn" Life is a beautiful thing that should not be wasted. Life must be lived without warning; it is not to be taken for granted. We will never fully understand life, not even in a million years. The theme of John Keats' "To Autumn" is to enjoy life, even as you grow old and it begins to move away from you. He spreads his message through the time frame, imagery, and diction of the stanzas. To begin with, the time frame of the stanzas begins to prove the theme. By itself, it doesn?t prove the theme, but, when added with the imagery and diction, it gets the job done....   [tags: John Keats Autumn Essays Poem Poetry] 1681 words
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The Book of Yolek by Anthony Hetcht - The Holocaust was a tragic event in history which instilled fear and sorrow in so many. This time can be seen as one without order, because the law at the time said the actions taken were just (epigraph translation). A poet was able, however, to take such a chaotic time in history in the poem The Book of Yolek, and create a more personal attachment (for the reader) to the topic. The poet Anthony Hecht has taken the Holocaust (more specifically the moving of Jewish orphans to a concentration camp) and made it simple and nostalgic, taking a more calm approach to the subject ("5th August 1942: Warsaw Orphans Leave for Treblinka")....   [tags: holocaust, childhood memory, tragedy]
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Recalling War vs Mental Cases - Although the poems "Recalling War" by Robert Graves and "Mental Cases" by Wilfred Owen are both concerned with the damage that war does to the soldiers involved, they are different in almost every other respect. Owen's poem examines the physical and mental effects of war in a very personal and direct way - his voice is very much in evidence in this poem - he has clearly seen people like the 'mental cases' who are described. It is also evident that Owen's own experiences of the war are described: he challenges the reader with terrifying images, in order that the reader can begin to comprehend the causes of the madness....   [tags: Robert Graves, Wilfred Owen] 3509 words
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The Chimney Sweeper: Dispair - Throughout the Industrial Revolution in England in the 18th century, many children were forced to work against their own will, to support the growing need for labor in the demanding economy. William Blake’s “The Chimney Sweeper,” meticulously portrays the mindsets of two individuals obligated to carry out these societal expectations of working at a very young age. However, contrary to societies opinion on harmful child labor, Blake uses irony and sarcasm to convey his critical allegation of the wrongdoings of the church and society on their lack of effort to intervene and put an end to the detrimental job of adolescent chimney sweeping....   [tags: William Blake, the chimney sweeper] 1217 words
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Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori means it is a sweet and glorious - Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori means it is a sweet and glorious thing to die for your country. It is a poem written by an officer Connotations Dulce et decorum est Pro patria mori means it is a sweet and glorious thing to die for your country. It is a poem written by an officer in the army in the world war one. The poem contains four stanza’s which all vary in their lengths. The first stanza is a description of a group of young soldiers retreating from the frontline. The lines are long which show how slow they are walking....   [tags: English Literature] 1459 words
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