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Taking a Look at the Sioux Uprising - “Over the Earth I come.” This is not a statement made in haste but a declaration of war, coming from the mouth of a Sioux warrior, a Dakota. They call him Crooked Lightning. That was the first and only true announcement about the planned uprising from the Dakota Nation. The Sioux Uprising of 1862 was appallingly deadly and destructive considering it may have been avoided if the United States had paid the Sioux their gold on time. The Dakota Nation didn’t just wake up one day and decide to attack the settlers....   [tags: broken promises and brutal racism] 824 words
(2.4 pages)
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Background on the Sioux Indian Culture - The three online movies I chose to learn more about the culture in which I chose to write about and depict the life and culture of the Sioux Indian, (both past and present) are all from YouTube, and are as follows: *500 Tribes, *Meet the Sioux Indians, Plains Indian Tribe, 1949, and *The Great Sioux Nation. The films portrayed the Sioux in an almost identical manor, and although each of the films ran from twenty-five minutes long, to an hour and a half, they covered the same amount of ground and produced the same information....   [tags: Native American Indian history]
:: 3 Works Cited
890 words
(2.5 pages)
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Forgotten Voices of the Sioux Nation - ... Besides managing the children and food, the Sioux woman’s main responsibility was the tipi. Not only did they make them singlehandedly, but they owned them and were responsible for moving them every time the tribe went to a different seasonal camp. The layout inside the tipi was very general. Men slept on the right and women on the left. There would be a space at the middle-back part of the tipi for any guests of honor. Also included was a small fire that could be lit in the middle with a small smoke escape at the top to keep the tipi warm during harsh winters (Jefferson)....   [tags: responsibilities, family, hunting] 796 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Sioux Legend The Rabbit and the Elk - Animals have always been mentors to humans, informing them about upcoming dangers, and teaching them how to hunt, gather, and find fresh water. The animals’ ways were of such a magnitude of importance that the Native Americans began to use stories based on these animals to teach lessons in life. Stories about these animals have emphasized the virtues of the animals, and repeatedly taught children to be, “wise, gentle, brave, or cheerful in the same manner as certain birds and animals” (Caduto and Bruchac, XI)....   [tags: hunt, fresh water, dangers]
:: 6 Works Cited
1261 words
(3.6 pages)
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Trandcendentalism in Zuni and Sioux Tribe - ... The American status of women started to evolve across the course of history. A woman Historian, Spruill, studied women’s legal rights in colonial women. She found the “rule of thumb” law; a law that stated that is was legal to hit your wife/spouse with an object no thicker than the man’s thumb. This law also stated that it was only legal if it did not inflict injury or cause death. Another thing that has changed for women are how they dress; the hem got shorter, and women started wearing less clothing....   [tags: women, power, norms, abusive] 584 words
(1.7 pages)
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Lakota (Sioux) Indians and Creation - ... Finally a young man decided to see what Iktomi was about, and came up. His name was Tokahe, and is now called the First. Tokahe was shown the wonders of the top soil by Iktomi and he then decided to bring his people up with him. He was telling them of the great things he had seen, but an Elder warned him of the danger. Tokahe was still determined to bring his people up, and so the Elder went out of the hole before the others and became the Buffalo Nation, to protect the people when danger arose....   [tags: Native American beliefs]
:: 6 Works Cited
1543 words
(4.4 pages)
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Social Recognition Issues of the Sioux Tribe - Social recognition Issues of the Sioux Tribe The Sioux Tribe, as well as various others have been struggling for recognition by the federal state government. The Sioux Tribe itself has only been just recognized since the year of 1975 since the USTDC had administered and approved the social and economical development of these people (Daniels 7). The USTDC may have approved this act, along with broadening various new programs to socially enhance the Sioux and other tribes, but would not have the power or ability in order to push past the thoughts of people who opposed the idea of accepting Native Americans into modern society....   [tags: Native Americans ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1623 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Resistance and Removal of the Sioux Nation - The Resistance and Removal of the Sioux Nation On December 29, 1890 at Wounded Knee, South Dakota the soldiers of the U.S. 7th cavalry slaughtered unarmed Sioux men, women and children led by Chief Big Foot. The 146 corpses were gathered up and thrown casually into a mass grave. This massacre marked the end of the Sioux resistance and ultimately the Sioux Nation. The battle that had gone on for ten long years before this between the Great Sioux Nation and the United States came to a sad end, but not unnoticed by the rest of the country....   [tags: Papers] 1498 words
(4.3 pages)
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Urban Renewal and Decay and the Sioux City Orpheum Theater - On September 15th, 2001, the lush ruby-red curtain was drawn and music began to fill the theater. Each of the 2500 seats was filled as they listened in awe and gazed around the French Renaissance-styled room. The finale of the evening’s program featured a prideful rendition of America the Beautiful by the audience. Just days before then, the infamous September 11th attacks had happened on the east coast. The shock was still fresh, but this night was not a night of mourning, but of celebration. After an estimated $12 million and a decade long renovation project, the Orpheum Theater of Sioux City, Iowa was back to its original 1920’s grandeur....   [tags: architecture, style, history]
:: 8 Works Cited
1597 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Lakota and The Sioux Indigenous People: Tale of Two Tribes - The history of Native Americans is rich in cultural customs, philosophies, and fundamental ideologies. This history has also been marked by injustice, tragedy, and suffering. No discussion of Native American tribes and the present land they possess, their reservations, can be complete without the mention of poverty. Many Native American tribes like the Oglala Lakota Nation are waist deep in poverty and economic conflict. The United Nations Permanent Forum on Indigenous Peoples has recognized the plight of native peoples all across the world that are experiencing the same disenfranchisement as the Lakota peoples....   [tags: native americans, ideologies, tragedy]
:: 13 Works Cited
1637 words
(4.7 pages)
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Sioux Indians - Sioux Indians We're going to tell you about a tribe of Indians known as the Sioux Indians. The Sioux Indians lived on the great plains. The Sioux's tribe is partially and fully located in 7 states. The states are known as Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Their natural resources include deer, beans, wild rice, and buffalo. The Sioux nation was divided into 7 groups. They were known as the 7 council fires. Each council fire had its own leaders and own group of families that always camped together....   [tags: American History] 1412 words
(4 pages)
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Sioux City Crash - Sioux City Crash INTRODUCTION Aircraft accidents can be a tragic thing. Some people may argue that all are avoidable. But when considering this statement, one must always remember there is an element that is in all accidents. Humans. Either through design, being flown by, or maintained by, humans are in all aspects of flying. As long as humans are in 100% control of an airplane there will be accidents. However, a good side to an accident is it is thoroughly researched by the NTSB....   [tags: Essays Papers]
:: 2 Works Cited
1690 words
(4.8 pages)
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Legislation against Pit Bulls and Owners in Sioux City, Iowa - If you’re a pit bull owner in Sioux City, Iowa, you are faced with certain ordinances that make it more difficult to own and keep your dog. This is Sioux City’s attempt to keep its citizens’ safe and prevent the abuse and harm of the pitbull. The city is trying to promote safety and animal advocacy. This ordinance is not effective because it punishes the animal and not the owner; it also does not take into account the animals individual personality. Legislators should create laws that consider all dogs based on their individual behavior and hold owner accountable for their animals....   [tags: bsl, breed specific legislation, pit bulls, laws, ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1684 words
(4.8 pages)
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Dances with Wolves: Changing from a Dignified Solider to a Sioux Warrior - In the movie Dances with Wolves Lieutenant John Dunbar is a dynamic character; changing throughout the film from a dignified United States Army soldier, to a passionate Lakota Sioux member. On his journey, Dances With Wolves takes in many experiences many have only dreamt about. When he rides Cisco out onto the battlefield in a suicide attempt, he has no idea that he indeed will live and will never lead the same life again. John Dunbar changed in many ways reflected upon in the film, including: mindset, clothing, and his sense of identity; it is though these character traits that Dances With Wolves discovers that inside everyone is a frontier just waiting to be explored....   [tags: Dances with Wolves,] 808 words
(2.3 pages)
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The White Collar Crime: The Ponzi Scheme in Sioux City, Iowa - I. INTRODUCTION Shirley lee, was getting ready for retirement when finding out, she had lost all her savings. Her and many from her community invested more than 90 million dollars into James Powell and Calwell Investment Company. Calwell and Powell were friends of many of the investors, the even attended the same church as most of the community, and this however did not stop both men from running the largest Ponzi scheme in Sioux City, Iowa. Victims were told their money was being invested in real estate however; their money was transferred to Calwell and Powell’s personal account, where they used the money on their families, vacations and home re-modeling....   [tags: victims, money, invest, criminals] 2603 words
(7.4 pages)
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Film Critique of Dances with Wolves - Film Critique of “Dances with Wolves” This is a wonderful movie that is set in 1863 during the civil war. The main character is John Dunbar, a Lieutenant in the United States Army, who is played by Kevin Costner. The movie begins with Dunbar in the field hospital with a severely wounded leg that the Dr.’s are planning to amputate. Dunbar decides that he does not want to live minus a leg and leaves the field hospital, takes a horse and rides across the length of the enemy lines where he expects that he will meet his death....   [tags: Soldier, Sioux, Culture]
:: 1 Works Cited
1003 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Film Thunderheart: Ray Levoi’s Heroic Quest - ... Ray is assigned to the reservation because he is one fourth Sioux, yet is unaware of what to expect from the locals. Through Ray, the audience gets a sense of what reservations are like, beautiful prairies and mountains are disrupted by impoverished housing and extreme poverty. Ray acts as if he is superior to the rest of the natives on the reservation and is initially too focused on his job. He is accordingly portrayed as insensitive towards, and to an extent judgmental of, Native American culture and traditions....   [tags: Sioux, Murder, Identity]
:: 1 Works Cited
902 words
(2.6 pages)
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A Ritual in American History, the Ghost Dance - ... Some of the Indians were afraid that a fight might break out so about 300 Sioux left the reservation. He army had heard about the stories of torture endured by the dancers and were sickened by it, but they were not fearful against it. On the other hand the residents were afraid of the dance. They didn’t like how the dance would get rid of all the whites and how the dance would bring the Indians so much power. When the two sides came in contact the Sioux reluctantly agreed to be transported to Wounded Knee creek on pine ridge reservation....   [tags: sioux indians, tragedy, battle] 716 words
(2 pages)
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Sioux Indians, Tantanka Yotanka, Custer's Last Stand - Sioux Indians, Tantanka Yotanka, Custer's Last Stand The Sioux Indians are a large Indian group, located North of Mexico. The actual Sioux name, Nadouessioux means little snakes. The Sioux Indians moved from the east and then ended up near the Mississippi, then moved again to somewhere around Dakota, a little north of Mexico. They referred to themselves as the Otecti Cacowin (Seven Council Fires) because they had 7 council divisions. They were Mdewakantons, Wahpekutes, Wahpetons, Sissetons, Yanktons, Yanktonais, and the Tentons....   [tags: Social Issues, Anthropology, History] 326 words
(0.9 pages)
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Autobiography of Chief Black Hawk - Reading the autobiography of Chief Black Hawk made me realize how giving the Sac tribe actually was compared to as they call it the whites. The Sac Tribe was based on peace and spiritual lifestyle. They were not all for themselves none of them were. If someone they knew didn’t have what they needed but they did, they wouldn’t hesitate to share. That is how all communities should be but unfortunately we aren’t all as giving as the Sac. They were such good people, which make me wonder why the whites were so devious towards them....   [tags: the sac tribe, sioux indian] 1319 words
(3.8 pages)
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Fort Laramie Treaty - After many years of battling with the Native Americans for land, the United States grew tired of the fight and sought "peace". The first Fort Laramie treaty of 1851 acknowledged the Lakota territory, which consisted of North and South Dakota, parts of Montana, Nebraska, and Wyoming as belonging to the Sioux Indians. This was a considerably large section of land equating to about five percent of the United States (Calloway, 2012). The U.S. government realized the abundant natural resources of gold that existed in this territory and attempted to enact the Bozeman Trail....   [tags: Laramie, Sioux, United States]
:: 1 Works Cited
1080 words
(3.1 pages)
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Proposed Soft Drink Ban of Sodas Larger than 24 ounces in the City of Sioux Falls - Mayor Mike Huether has proposed a ban on sales of fountain soft drinks in the city of Sioux Falls. The proposal would effectively end the sale of all fountain soft drinks larger than 24 ounces at all city regulated businesses including restaurants, hotels, gas stations, etc. Much like the proposed soda ban set forth by New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg, Mayor Mike Huether's proposal has the intent of making Sioux Falls a healthier city. There are many people that believe a ban on 'oversized' soft drinks would be beneficial in the fight against obesity, while those who oppose such a legislation see it is an infringement of the people's rights....   [tags: trying to make a healthier city] 545 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Wounded Knee Massacre - The Wounded Knee Massacre was final result of the growing problems between the Lakota Sioux and the American Government. After the Civil War tension began to escalate and ended on December 29, 1890. When the government took over most of the Lakota land and forced them into reservations the Indian way of life was destroyed and the large bison herds were hunted until they were endangered. The life in reservations was also difficult since many of the promises made by the government remained unfulfilled: “Promises to increase rations, made by U.S....   [tags: Lakota Sioux vs American government] 1237 words
(3.5 pages)
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What Buddhism and Sioux Tradition Tell Us about Meditation and Having a Vision - What do Buddhism and Sioux tradition tell us about meditation and having a vision. First of all, we meditate in Buddhism because it gives us “the nourishment for your spirit and nourishment for your body,” (Hanh, p. 42). We also meditate to heal other or ourselves. In the Sioux traditions having a vision is like healing a person. Only the holy man can have the vision. The method of meditation and having a vision is like a method of relaxing and healing the state of conscious. Sometimes having a vision is like having a daydream....   [tags: Papers] 771 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Battle of the Little Bighorn - The conflict that occurred between the U.S. Government and the Native American Indian tribes, known as the Great Sioux War. It was a lengthy, disjointed struggle between the U.S. Army and the allied tribes of the Teton Sioux and Northern Cheyenne Indians that occurred in the span of fifteen months between, March 1876 and May 18771. Hostilities between the U.S. Government and the Native American Indian tribes grew due to the movement of settlers on the land promised to them. The Northern Plains, which consist of the Dakotas, Nebraska, Wyoming and Montana, is where the majority of the war took place....   [tags: american history, indian tribes]
:: 2 Works Cited
1540 words
(4.4 pages)
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Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - The film, Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee, documents the annihilation of the American Indians in the late 1800s. The film starts out in the Black Hills of the Dakotas, a land sacred to the Sioux Native Americans. The Sioux claimed the land and their population flourished due to the good resources in the area. The white people want to gain control of the land and force the natives to relocate to another area. They want the natives to assimilate and believe that this strategy will improve the nation....   [tags: Annhilation of the American indians] 554 words
(1.6 pages)
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Dances With Wolves - The film, Dances with Wolves, staring Kevin Costner gives a historically accurate presentation of the Sioux Indians and their way of life. In this production, Lieutenant John Dunbar, played by Costner, is rewarded for his heroic actions in the Civil War by being offered an opportunity to see the American frontier before it is gone. Dunbar is assigned to an abandoned fort where his only friends are a lone wolf and his beloved horse, Cisco. After several weeks of waiting for more American troops, a Sioux Indian makes contact with Dunbar and reports this finding to his chief....   [tags: essays research papers] 1119 words
(3.2 pages)
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Battle of Little Bighorn - Along United States Highway 212 in Crow Agency, Montana marks the graves of troopers resting at Fiddler's Green. Furthermore, these Soldiers were members of the Seventh United States Cavalry who perished during a fierce melee when hostiles came to get their scalps. These Soldiers lived, fought and died during an era known as The Indian Wars, which clashed over many centuries, starting with the Powhatan Confederacy in 1607 and ending with the Wounded Knee Massacre in 1890. Colonists and Natives were to blame for this long, traversed war, therefore resulting in numerous campaigns that entailed the 300 years of war....   [tags: Unites States Soldiers, American History]
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1811 words
(5.2 pages)
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Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee - Since the first Europeans landed their ships on North American soil, the Indians have been a present people in our history. The peaceful beginnings of relations with the Indians soon turn hostile as greed overtook the genuine humanity of the settlers, causing them to eventually destroy the Indian way of life. Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee depicts the relationships between European Americans and Indians from 1492 to 1890 from the perspective of the Indian people. Pilgrims that landed on the Massachusetts shore in 1492 encountered the Wampanog people, marking the introduction of the two people groups....   [tags: american history, europeans, indians] 1668 words
(4.8 pages)
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Dances with Wolves - The representation of American Indians in US pop culture is troubling at best: natives are frequently depicted as violent savages and out of touch with human values. To counter this, Kevin Costner, being part Cherokee himself, chooses to portray a positive and realistic image of American Indians in his film Dances with Wolves. Although one could argue that the film does appear to validate certain stereotypes, Costner calculatedly—much like a game of chess—uses these stereotypes to connect with his viewers and ultimately forces them into checkmate without their realizing....   [tags: Native American, Kevin Costner, Indians] 825 words
(2.4 pages)
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Wounded Knee:The Ties of Religion and Violence - Wounded Knee: The Ties of Religion and Violence On the morning of December 29, 1890, many Sioux Indians (estimated at above two hundred) died at the hands of the United States Army near Wounded Knee Creek on the Pine Ridge Reservation. The Indians were followers of the Ghost Dance religion, devised by Wovoka, a Paiute prophet, as a spiritual outlet for Indian repression by whites. The United States Army set out to intercept this group of Native Americans because they performed the controversial Ghost Dance....   [tags: Indian Religion Religious History Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
3114 words
(8.9 pages)
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Native Americans vs the United States of America - Times were very hard for Native Americans during the mid to late 1800s. The reasons for their afflictions could only be blamed upon the United States of America. For thousands of years, Native Americans had roamed around the Americas. There had also been many tribes spread across the West that fought between each other in order to have their land.1 It wasn’t until after reconstruction in the United States, that the white Americans started having ordeals with the Native Americans. The main tribes involved in the conflict starting around 1850 were the Lakota people and the Sioux....   [tags: General Custer, the Gold Rush]
:: 14 Works Cited
1969 words
(5.6 pages)
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Charles Eastman: Bridging the Gap Between Cultures - Charles Eastman made great strides to bridge the gap between the Native Americans and the white man. Born a Santee Sioux, Eastman excelled in his assimilated life, thereby gaining the respect of the white man, which he used to assist the Native American. He was able to give a voice to the culture and its people, which was quickly being silenced by a Eurocentric government. Eastman exemplified the abilities of the Native American through his accomplishments as an author, lecturer, physician, and activist....   [tags: Native American Culture]
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1228 words
(3.5 pages)
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Black Elk Speaks by John Neihardt - ... Black Elk's dream baffles him because conditions do not seem to allow him to complete it. In Chapter 11, U.S. soldiers kill the great warrior Crazy Horse, whose loss is a grave one for the Sioux. In chapter 12, Black Elk is trying to avoid reservation life and is living in Canada with a small band of his people. The Chapters 13 through 18 show Black Elk's snowballing nervousness about taking control of his role as the healer and holy man. These chapters also describe the presentation of public rituals (the horse dance and the heyoka ceremony) that let Black Elk to undertake his role openly....   [tags: personal narratives, story analysis, book review] 1347 words
(3.8 pages)
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Positive Portrayal of Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves - Positive Portrayal of Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves The film Dances With Wolves, attempts to change our stereotypical view of Native Americans, as savage and uncivilized people, by allowing us to see life from their perspective, helping us to realize that many of their experiences are not all that different from our own. The main setting of the film is the Great Western Plains of North Dakota. John Dunbar comes to discover the west before it is completely destroyed through settlement and what he actually finds is a group of people that he comes to understand and love, for all of the qualities that he finds within their individual lives....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1845 words
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Dances With Wolves Analysis - Dances With Wolves Analysis The movie "Dances With Wolves" was produced in 1990 and directed by Kevin Costner who starred as the main character. "Dances with Wolves" tells us the story of a white man who gets acquainted with the Sioux, who learns to love and respect them as valuable people with a culture and who discovers how wrong white people's preconceived ideas about Native Americans are. A sense of adventure and drama is the feeling "Dances with Wolves" gives us. With this movie, Costner made his debut as a film director....   [tags: Movies Native Americans History Papers]
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2122 words
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Community Analysis: North County Branch - St. Charles City-County Library District - History & Geography Portage des Sioux, Missouri, a small river town situated near the confluence of the Mississippi and Missouri rivers, was settled in 1799 (Mincke, 2004, p. 13). The first permanent home dates to 1805, one year after Lewis & Clark set off on their expedition up the Missouri river (Mincke, 2004, p. 24). In 1975, Charles City-County Library District, the North County Branch opened its first branch — sited on the southern edge of town in a former one-room schoolhouse (St. Charles City-County Library District, 2010)....   [tags: Community Analysis]
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2286 words
(6.5 pages)
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Black Elk and the History of the Lakota Native American - ... After gold was discovered in the Black Hills, Chief Crazy Horse led a resistance against General George Crook in 1876. After Crook’s defeat, Chief Crazy Horse had his men join the central group of Sioux Native Americans led by Sitting Bull. It was at that campsite near the Little Bighorn River that the Sioux Native Americans defeated General George Custer. But soon after, Chief Crazy Horse was captured and accidentally killed (“ Black Elk”). This led to a shift of Sioux Native Americans which ultimately led them to the Pine Ridge Reservation....   [tags: injured, war, suffering, treatment]
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680 words
(1.9 pages)
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The Ghost Dance Movement of 1890: Causes and Effects - It was a great time of despair for the Native American people as the defeat of their nations by the ever westward expanding United States and subsequent placement onto reservations disrupted their culture and way of life as it had existed for hundreds of years. The decade leading up to 1890, which was a main focal point in the history of Native Americans, saw the passing of the 1887 Dawes Severalty Act which called for the breaking up of reservations and offering the Indians an opportunity to become citizens and giving them an allotment of land to farm or graze livestock on (Murrin 628)....   [tags: american history, native american]
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1428 words
(4.1 pages)
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American History: Indian Tribes and Ghost Dance - Different Indian tribes all over the Western territory, which have thrived in a nomadic lifestyle since well before Europeans ever arrived in the Americas, were now being oppressed by a new, but powerful nation. This was a new nation eager for more land, money, and trade known as The United States of America. As these Indians were being oppressed, they all put up a fight but none of them were successful. Indians were forced to move onto reservations where they had to completely change their lifestyle after being plagued by a foreign people....   [tags: nomadic lfestyle, europeans]
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743 words
(2.1 pages)
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Dancing With Wolves - 1. The film Dancing with Wolves takes place in South Dakota in 1863. John Dunbar is the main character who hurts his leg in battle and is sent to the frontier on a new mission as a Lieutenant. When Dunbar arrives in South Dakota he is there alone, no one else had made their way their yet. Dunbar gradually starts to live with the Indians and become one of them getting the name Dancing with Wolves. Another main character is Standing with a Fist, who marries Dancing with Wolves. Standing with a Fist is an American who was captured but the Indians when was very young....   [tags: essays research papers] 643 words
(1.8 pages)
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Comparing the Representation of Native Americans in Two Western Films - Comparing the Representation of Native Americans in Two Western Films The 2 films that are going to be compared are: “The Searchers” A 1956 western drama, directed by John ford & starring John Wayne as Ethan Edwards and “Dances With Wolves” a 1990Â’s adventure western directed by and starring Kevin Costner. The reason why these two films have been chosen is because of the very significant distinction in the way in which the Native Americans are represented. The Searchers story begins in Texas in 1868....   [tags: Papers] 1308 words
(3.7 pages)
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Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves - Shifting Perceptions in Dances With Wolves In Kevin Costner's motion picture Dances With Wolves, a white veteran of the Civil War, John Dunbar, ventures to the American frontier, where he encounters a tribe of Sioux Indians. At first, both parties are quite wary and almost hostile to each other, but after some time, Dunbar realizes that they have both grown to love and value each other as friends. As the movie critic Robert Ebert comments, "Dunbar possesses the one quality he needs to cut through the entrenched racism of his time: He is able to look another man in the eye, and see the man, rather than his attitudes about the man....   [tags: Dances With Wolves Film Essays]
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1805 words
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The Beautiful State of Montana - Montana Essay Montana is a part of the country that many people do not know much about its history. Montana is divided into two parts, East and West. Eastern Montana is part of the Northern Great Plains and has played pivotal roles in American history since the early 1800’s. Western Montana is a history made up of gold rushes and the Copper King Marcus Daly. The history of Montana is that of many tales from Montanan Indian Tribes going back hundreds and thousands of years before American expansion into the region....   [tags: American history and territories] 2640 words
(7.5 pages)
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Changing Native American Stereotypes in the Film, Dances with Wolves - Changing Native American Stereotypes in the Film, Dances with Wolves The film Dances with Wolves, that was written by Michael Blake and directed by Kevin Costner, helps to shift our perspective of Native Americans from one of stereotypical distaste, to one of support and respect. According to an anonymous critic on www.eFilmcritic.com "This is one of the few westerns that devotes its time to looking at the plight of the American Indians (particularly the Sioux), who were thought by some as even more subhuman than blacks during the 1800's (and even during parts of the 1900's)." It has always been thought that Native Americans of old were savage, non-feeling, unemotional, cold-blooded kille...   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1552 words
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Biological and Cultural Consequences of European Contact with the Native Americans - The consequences of European contact with the Native Americans had grave consequences surpassing the expectations of both sides. However, while the Europeans were able to overcome most of the initial problems surrounding the contact, the Native Americans endured the effects for much longer which led to the decline of Native American power in North America. Both biological effects such as the impact of diseases, and cultural effects including the formation of new societies and the European influence, had devastating effects on the lives the Native Americans had formerly known....   [tags: American History]
:: 3 Works Cited
1980 words
(5.7 pages)
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The Battle of Rsebud Creek - ... “John F. Finerty gives an account of the surroundings: At about 8 o’clock, we halted in a valley, very similar in the formation to the one in which we had pitched our camp the preceding night. Rosebud stream, indicated by the thick growth of wild roses, or sweet briar, from which its name is derived, flowed sluggishly through it, dividing it from south to north into two almost equal parts. The hills seem to rise on every side, and we were within easy musket shot of those most remote.”6 General Crook then paused his command for an early lunch in the Rosebud creek valley....   [tags: general george crook, civil war]
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1404 words
(4 pages)
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Montana Battles - The only battle remembered in the Indian Wars was the Battle of the Little Bighorn. Custer’s brilliant last stand. Custer made the biggest mistake of his life and that is what propelled him to fame. U.S. Army performed better without him. There were other battles besides that one. For instance the Battle of Rosebud Creek. Led by General Crook, the U.S. Army got attacked by Sioux and Northern Cheyenne warriors. The Army fought hard but lost in the end. How about the Battle of the Bear Paw Mountains....   [tags: U.S. History]
:: 6 Works Cited
2880 words
(8.2 pages)
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Undoing Stereotypes in the Movie, Dances With Wolves - Undoing Stereotypes in the Movie, Dances With Wolves Hollywood has helped create and perpetuate many different stereotypical images of the different races in the world. Those stereotypes still continue to affect the way we think about each other today and many of those stereotypes have been proven to be historically inaccurate. The movie Dances With Wolves, directed by actor Kevin Costner, does an excellent job in attempting to promote a greater acceptance, understanding, and sympathy towards Native American culture, instead of supporting the typical stereotype of Native Americans being nothing but brutal, blood thirsty savages....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1218 words
(3.5 pages)
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The White Buffalo Calf Woman - The White Buffalo Calf Woman The Lakota Sioux Indians of the Great Plains possess rich religious traditions which are tied closely to the Earth. Though the relegation of these people to reservations amid the environmental disasters of American development has resulted in the near destruction of an ancient culture, some Lakota Sioux continue to fight for the preservation of their sacred lands animals, civil rights, and way of life. The seven original bands of the Great Sioux Nation were joined in an alliance called the “Seven Council Fires.” This confederation included three separate groups, each with its own dialect; the Santee spoke Dakota, the Yankton spoke Nakota, and the Teton spoke...   [tags: Papers] 863 words
(2.5 pages)
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Sitting Bull - Sitting Bull Sitting Bull, whose Indian name was Tatanka Iyotake, was born in the Grand River, present-day South Dakota in 1831. He was a member of the Sioux. Sitting Bull was a member of the Sioux tribe. He joined his first war party at the age of 14, against the Crow. Sioux fought against hostile tribes and white intruders. He was known for his fearlessness in battles. Sitting Bull became a leader of the Strong Heart warrior society, and increased Sioux hunting grounds. U.S. army continually invaded their territory....   [tags: Papers] 367 words
(1 pages)
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Battle of little bighorn - LTC George Armstrong Custer did not effectively apply the concept of mission command as a warfighting function during the Battle of Little Bighorn. While it is important to understand the context in which Custer made his decisions, those circumstances offer little in terms of excusing the fiasco that was Little Bighorn. Custer failed to follow orders, did not take pertinent intelligence into consideration, did not adequately plan or execute protection of his forces, and fought without essential fires equipment available to him....   [tags: history, ltc george armstrong custer]
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1599 words
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Battle Of The Little Big Horn - The journey of exploration to the western territories brought the white man many great things, but they did face some opposition. The US government made plans to explore the Black Hills, after hearing of the gold it contained. This was not an easy task. The Sioux, with strong force, were not giving up their sacred land easily. The only way to gain the territory of the Black Hills was to wage war against the Sioux. The Battle of the Little Big Horn was one battle that the US will never forget....   [tags: essays research papers] 815 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Analysis of the Struggles of an African-American Man and a Native American Man - It has long been said that people turn to religion during their most desperate and loneliest moments. This theory was very evident in the lives of two very different real-world people: Black Elk and Malcolm X. Black Elk, a Lakota Sioux Indian, and Malcolm X, an African-American, had many similar experiences despite their differences in geographical location, methods, and religion. Malcolm X and Black Elk turned to Islam and the Sioux’s indigenous religion, respectively, for direction and strength to be liberated from oppression by the United States (US) Government (and the mainstream-American community) and to fight for their respective communities....   [tags: Society Analysis History]
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1572 words
(4.5 pages)
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Stripped of Personal Freedom: Native Americans in the West - Throughout our country’s history there have been several groups who have fared less that great. Every minority group was treated unfairly, Indians were uprooted and had no control, I can’t imagine for a second being a soldier in combat, women struggled for basic rights, and many people fell victim to the changing ways of our economy, losing their jobs and fighting to survive. It seems wrong to pick one group over another, as if to say some people who were treated horribly or who faced mounting obstacles didn’t actually have it as bad as another group....   [tags: American history, Indians, poverty, economy]
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904 words
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Life Trials and a Police Officer’s Generative Accomplishments - Erik Erikson’s theory of psychosocial development throughout the life span, much like Sigmund Freud, organizes human personality development in a series of stages (Cherry, 2011). Erikson’s psychosocial theory covers personality development from birth to death; other developmental theories explicitly focus on childhood (Harder, 2009). The eight stages of Erikson’s psychosocial theory distinguish a human’s successful transition into the following developmental stage by successfully overcoming crises and struggle a particular developmental stage presents (Hutchison, 2011, p....   [tags: Psychology, Erikson, Freud] 1673 words
(4.8 pages)
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The Dawes Severalty Act of 1887 - ... This expansion posed a major problem in regards to the Native American. Most of the southern and eastern tribes had already been removed from their lands and forced to move west in the 1830s.1 Later, in 1867, a peace commission was appointed to persuade western Native Americans to relinquish their land and move to reservations. Once moved onto these reservations, the Native Americans would be wards of the government until they learned to be more like the white people.2 While few whites questioned the necessity of this policy, the Plains Native Americans would resist mightily....   [tags: failure, treatment, diversity, rights, culture] 838 words
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Mongols and Plains Indians - Two cultures, thousands of miles apart, show similarities that would be expected of neighboring civilizations. Both cultures arose on similar terrain. This terrain was a luscious grassland. One civilization grew up in Midwest North America, the other in Central Asia. The first civilization was the Plains Indians. The second was the Mongols. Each culture had a common form of religion. This religion was shamanism. Wordiq defines it as "a range of traditional beliefs and practices that involve the ability to diagnose, cure, and sometimes cause human suffering because of a special relationship with, or control over, spirits." The cultures were also affected by the horse....   [tags: Comparative, Cultures] 1809 words
(5.2 pages)
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The Wounded Knee Massacre - ... The Sioux's Christ figure, Wovoka, was said to have flown over Sitting Bull and Short Bull and taught them the dance and the songs. The Ghost Dance legend was that the next spring, when the grass was high, the Earth would be covered with a new layer of soil, covering all white men. Wild buffalo and horses would return and there would be swift running water, sweet grass, and new trees. All Indians who danced the Ghost dance would be floating in the air when the new soil was being laid down and would be saved....   [tags: terrible events in US history] 555 words
(1.6 pages)
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Shifting Views on Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves - Shifting Views on Native Americans in the Film, Dances With Wolves A wounded soldier lay on an operation table. The scene is surely not that unusual. 150 years ago, the medical field dealt with gangrene and infections by amputating any wounded limb. Now John Dunbar finds himself in almost the same situation. On a stroke of luck, as it would turn out, the doctor feels to tired to complete the operation on Dunbar and decides to finish for the day before taking his leg off. In the moments that followed, a frustrated, confused and disillusioned Dunbar pulls his boots back on and stumbles back onto the battle field....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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1792 words
(5.1 pages)
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Oppression of American Indians in Our Hearts Fell to the Ground - From the Sioux in the North, to the Tonkawa in the South, tribes filled North America when the Europeans first set foot on the soil that we now know as the United States. The relationship between the Native American tribes and the Europeans had its fair share of difficulties for the next thirty years. Faced with the threat of the westward movement, as well as the ruthless military treatment that came with it, the North Americans began their unjustified, inhumane battle for survival. The Europeans colonization of North America has forever changed the lives and cultures of the Native Americans....   [tags: American History] 1314 words
(3.8 pages)
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They Died With Their Boots On - They Died With Their Boots On Produced in 1943, They Died With Their Boots On, a Warner Brothers® film, is a horribly inaccurate account of the events that lead to the Battle of Little Big Horn. His early days in war were depicted accurately, however. Boots told of his experiences at West Pointe; the most important experience is, notably, his graduation. He received the absolute worst scores ever recorded at West Pointe upon his commencement. After that point, it all goes down hill. Custer was also a womanizer, but in this film he was quite a gentlemen, being sure to get Elizabeth Bacon’s father’s permission for everything the two did together....   [tags: essays papers] 433 words
(1.2 pages)
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Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves - Tone Techniques: Dances With Wolves    In his novel, ”Dances With Wolves”,  Michael Blake uses several techniques throughout the story to enhance the tone displayed to the reader.             Blake uses tones that vary from sad, (war times) to happy (victorious.)  Tone can be defined as the emotion or feeling set upon a reader during a novel/short story. Most times, the tone will change. It can change from sad to dramatic, happy to angry, angry to calm, or basically anything else....   [tags: Dances With Wolves] 437 words
(1.2 pages)
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Crazy Horse - Crazy Horse The European settlement of North America met its fiercest opponent, the Lakota also known as the Western Sioux, who inhabited most of the Great Plains. The Oglala tribe, a branch of the Sioux nation were key in the resistance against the white man. At the heart of their resistance stood crazy horse, a warrior that had no equal. Crazy Horse fought for the traditions of his people, until those same people wearied of war and in some cases, turned against him. Chief Crazy Horse led an extraordinary life and will always be remembered....   [tags: Biography Biographies Bio]
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1469 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Louisiana Purchase - ... So some days they could hunt enough meat to last the whole crew for days. Then on other hard times, they would have to go days without eating anything. With the help of the Sioux he was able to map some of the Purchase. While he was with the Sioux, he tried to make peace between the Sioux and Chippewas but failed. His expedition returned back from their mission in early 1806. In 1806, Pike was sent on his second expedition to explore Colorado and New Mexico where he discovered Pike’s Peak (Doherty 121)....   [tags: Thomas Jefferson, American history]
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1269 words
(3.6 pages)
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Wounding More than just the Knee: The Development of the Ghost Dance in America - Religion has always been an easy respite from the toils of daily life. Moreover, it has an intrinsic ability to help its followers make sense of matters during times of despair. For Native Americans, religion has long been an integral part of their culture. The Longhouse Religion, the Drummer-Dreamer Faith (which strongly foreshadowed the development of the Ghost Dance movement), and the Indian Shaker Church are all religions that originated deep within Native American culture. The white man, since his arrival in America, has always had extreme amounts of tension with Native Americans, often enacting laws in order to do what would make white society happy....   [tags: religion, Native Americans, Longhouse]
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1782 words
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Oral Traditions Link Native American Past and Present in Charles Eastman's Autobiography - ... After some time his grandmother understood he had made his decision and supported him, though she did not like the idea of him leaving. His internal battle represented a battle of tradition versus modernity; his grandmother represented tradition. She was everything that Eastman knew and was used to while his father represented modernity. He showed adventure and the idea of seeing things and experiencing new things. This shows a little bit of who Eastman was because Eastman never really lets us into himself, but this situation shows his personally leads towards the idea of modernity....   [tags: culture, tribe, souix]
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838 words
(2.4 pages)
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Dances with Wolves Gives Amazing Portrayal White and Indian Love Story - Summary The film "Dances With Wolves" is about the relationship between a Civil War fighter and a band of Souix Indians. The film opens on an especially dull note, as despairing Union lieutenant John W. Dunbar endeavors to slaughter himself on a suicide mission, however rather turns into an unintentional saint. His activities lead to his reassignment to a remote post in remote South Dakota, where he experiences the Sioux. Pulled in by the common straightforwardness of their lifestyle, he decides to abandon his previous life to go along with them, tackling the name Dances with Wolves....   [tags: civil war, souix, native americans]
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624 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Outrageousness of The Battle of Little Bighorn - ... He and his group decided to bombard the Native American camps from the north, but were soon surrounded by the Indian enemies. In the early hours of June 25, 1876, George Armstrong Custer led his cavalry along the Little Bighorn River in southeastern Montana. Scouts had reported seeing Chief Sitting Bull but Custer did not want to attack. He thought by attacking he could take the Indians by surprise and win the land for the United States. He drove the seventh cavalry forward towards a bend in the Little Bighorn river....   [tags: native americans, gold, land ] 1274 words
(3.6 pages)
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Custer and The Battle of Little Bighorn - Introduction “The Battle of the Little Bighorn, also known as Custer's Last Stand and, by the Indians involved, as the Battle of the Greasy Grass, was an armed engagement between combined forces of Lakota, Northern Cheyenne and Arapaho people against the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army. The battle, which occurred on June 25 and 26, 1876 near the Little Bighorn River in eastern Montana Territory, was the most famous action of the Great Sioux War of 1876.”i Was this battle led by a courageous General or a desperate man is search of being seen as an American hero by the eyes of America....   [tags: Custer's Last Stand]
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2255 words
(6.4 pages)
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Delmar The Spy That Got Away - INTRODUCTION This research paper is about the Soviet spy, George Koval, codename DELMAR who penetrated the Manhattan Project. The purpose of this research paper is to identify lessons learned based on George Koval’s activities with the Manhattan Project and not repeat the same Counterintelligence failures in the future. George Koval managed to elude capture and operate virtually unsuspected for the entire length of his espionage career against the U.S. and so little is known about him. Analysis of his activities should prove to be extremely valuable to the intelligence community....   [tags: manhattan project, george coval, espionage]
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2440 words
(7 pages)
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The Life of Geroge Armstrong Custer - ... By 1876, still in the Black Hills, tensions had risen between the United States and the Plains Indian Tribes, leading to a battle on June 25-26 by the Little Bighorn River between Custer’s 7th Cavalry and the Lakota and Cheyenne Tribes led by Crazy Horse and White Bull. Around 500 U.S. soldiers met an estimated 3,500 Indian warriors. All the U.S. troops were killed in what is often referred to as, “Custer’s Last Stand.” Custer was a part of many American Civil wars like First Battle of Bull Run, Peninsula Campaign, Battle in Antietam, Battle of Chancellorsville, Battle of Gettysburg, Overland Campaign, Siege Petersburg, Appomattox Campaign....   [tags: US history, civil war, ] 891 words
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What We Need is Faith - ... Army come in and demolish everything from every single Indian, then worst, moving them to a different area where the Army can keep an eye on the Indians. While the Indians are camped at a different area, one of the Sioux came to talk to the chief, Big Foot, about how he heard a call from the sky, which means their god. This man was called Wovoka. Wovoka received a message from the Creator. Soon an Indian messiah would come and the world would be free of the white man.(ushistory.com)....   [tags: u.s. army, native americans, ghost dance]
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629 words
(1.8 pages)
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A Glimpse into the Past with "Dances With Wolves" - Dances with Wolves is an epic film made in the year nineteen ninety shot in South Dakota and Wyoming. The film tells the story of a Civil War-era and a United States Army officer, Lieutenant Dunbar who travels to the American frontier to find a military post and befriends a local Sioux tribe. It shows how life was in times of the Civil War. The movie also shows how Indians lived and how they respected everything except the white men. This film tells the story of Lieutenant Dunbar, a United States Army Officer and a Indian tribe who eventually in time after meeting become friends....   [tags: Dances With Wolves, Native Americans, ] 644 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Cheyenne Tribe Being Expelled From Their Lands - In 1830s the U.S. congress began developing Indian policy with the main objective of removing all Native Indian Tribes out of any organized “state.” The plan was to allow the Indians to settle to the west in “Indian country” and never be disturbed again. However, the country’s population continued to grow, the Civil war had ended, freed slaves and those exhausted from war began to cry for new opportunities. The government found that if America was to flourish economically that they needed to encourage the settlement of the west....   [tags: Description, History, Native American Policy]
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574 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Life of Sitting Bull - The life of Tatanka Yotanka better known as Sitting Bull and the tragic events that led to his death will be discussed in this paper. Yotanka led a carefree life as a young boy with the Sioux tribe. He received early recognition from his tribe as a warrior and man of vision. During his youth he joined in the usual tribal raids for horses against traditional enemies such as the Crow and Assiniboin. This paper will explain the history behind Sitting Bull and how he grew into a warrior, a chief and how his life was tragically put to an end....   [tags: Biography] 1794 words
(5.1 pages)
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The Blanton Museum of Art - The purpose of paintings is to capture the image of something. Paintings have been around since prehistoric times and span all cultures. Paintings are seen as one image but can convey thousands of different meanings. Before photography, paintings were used to record important events. The Blanton Museum of Art is home to many different types of paintings. The paintings range from different landscapes in America to cowboys to Native Americans. There are five paintings in the Blanton Museum of Art that can convey an image and culture of the American Old West with vivid and detailed images of cowboys, Native Americans, and the landscape represented, which is an important aspect of American cultu...   [tags: American culture, the old west] 524 words
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How ‘Brave’ Are They? - Thus far, the game had not been an entertaining one to watch. At halftime, the score was 23-19, with Illinois over Michigan. Truth be told, the game itself was not even the main attraction on February 27, 2007. It had taken a back stage seat to the half-time show. This was the day Chief Illiniwek, the University of Illinois' mascot for eighty-one years, would be officially retired by the University due to pressure from the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA). Dan Maloney, a graduate student at the school, strode to mid-court one final time....   [tags: Ethics ]
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1149 words
(3.3 pages)
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Native American Music - Native American music has many different musical styles. Within every Native American tribe there is a variety of musical styles and instruments. In response to the research that I have conducted, there are three main musical styles that are going to be my point of focus. The Sioux Grass Dance, the Zuni Lullaby, and the Iroquois Quiver Dance are the principal methods which contribute to Native American music. The Sioux Grass Dance is considered to be the most popular style of Native American Music....   [tags: essays research papers] 476 words
(1.4 pages)
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Lakota Woman - Lakota Woman Mary was born with the name Mary Brave Bird. She was a Sioux from the Rosebud Reservation in South Dakota. She belonged to the "Burned Thigh," the Brule Tribe, the Sicangu. The Brules are part of the Seven Sacred Campfires, the seven tribes of the Western Sioux known collectively as the Lakota. The Brule rode horses and were great warriors. Between 1870 and 1880 all Sioux were driven into reservations, fenced in and forced to give up everything. Her family settled in on the reservation in a small place called He-Dog....   [tags: American History Native Americans Essays] 6839 words
(19.5 pages)
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