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Art and Republicanism - Art and Republicanism ABSTRACT: Republicanism is contrasted with liberalism with special reference to the notions of presence, absence and representation. The contrast is more conspicuous in the Platonic tradition of republicanism than it is in the Aristotelian tradition, the former being more likely to degenerate into some form of totalitarianism. Examples thereof are given in accordance with the distinction between a strong and a soft iconoclasm, as it is found both in Antiquity and in Eastern and Western Europe’s quest for absolute presence or—as in avantgarde art of modernity—for absolute self-presence of the work of art....   [tags: Government Republican Essays] 3136 words
(9 pages)
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JEFFERSONIAN REPUBLICANISM - JEFFERSONIAN REPUBLICANISM After the extreme partisanship of 1800, it was expected by supporters and foes alike that the presidential administration of Thomas Jefferson would pioneer substantial and even radical changes. The federal government was now in the hands of a relentless man and a persistent party that planned to diminish its size and influence. But although he overturned the principal Federalist domestic and foreign policies, Thomas Jefferson generally pursued the course as a chief executive, quoting his inaugural address “We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists.” With true republicans warming most of the seats of power throughout the branches, except in the Judiciary, he saw the tools of government as less of a potential instrument of oppression and more of a means to achieve republican goals....   [tags: essays papers]
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2053 words
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Being American: Liberty, Equality and Republicanism - ... Another inequality in America is racial inequality. For instance, Arizona passed the SB 1020 bill. Nicholas Riccardi stated, “The bill directs police to determine the immigration status of non-criminals if there is a 'reasonable suspicion' they are undocumented. Immigrant rights groups say it amounts to a police state” (n.p). Therefore, the abstract idea of equality in America is not one that is truly fulfilled. Equality for me is more accurately defined as a fairytale, were we as Americans only dream about it, yet never fully turn it into a realization....   [tags: Culture ]
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881 words
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Influenced by Republicanism, but not a True Republican - Influenced by Republicanism, but not a True Republican The philosophy of a republican form of government was certainly not a creation of James Madison and the Federalists. The idea of such a government has been around since the beginning of political philosophy. While the definition has changed over the centuries, certain constants continue to define a strictly republican regime. The goals and priorities of a republic are distinct yet dissimilar from those of James Madison’s philosophy. Generally, a republican government is defined as one which idealizes the public interests as the highest good and imposes a duty on each citizen to work toward the public interests before individual ones....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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2157 words
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Republicanism and Direct Democracy - Republicanism and direct democracy, these are two ways that a people can be governed. There is a major difference between these two systems. In a republican system the government represents the people. The representatives are chosen by popular vote and are given the power to make decisions on behalf of the people. The people do not get to voice their own opinions, the best they can do is vote for their representative and hope he wins. This can also be referred to as indirect democracy. Direct democracy which was exemplified in the ancient Athenian city-state, or the New England town meeting in modern times, is a government based solely on the people....   [tags: Politics] 895 words
(2.6 pages)
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Jeffersonian Republicans - JEFFERSONIAN DEMOCRACY Looking back on the election of 1800, Thomas Jefferson described it as being "as real a revolution in the principles of our government as that of 1776 was in its form; not effected indeed by the sword, as that, but by the rational and peaceable instrument of reform, the suffrage of the people." Jefferson saw his election as reversing an earlier trend away from republicanism. The departure from true republican principles, as he judged it, had begun with the economic policies of Alexander Hamilton favoring financial and manufacturing interests and the strengthening of the national government at the expense of the states....   [tags: Political Science] 1079 words
(3.1 pages)
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Jeffersonian-Republicans - The Jeffersonian-Republicans (also known as the Democratic-Republicans) were opposed to the Federalists from before 1801-1817. Leaders Thomas Jefferson and James Madison created the party in order to oppose the economic and foreign policies of Alexander Hamilton and the Federalist Party. The Democratic-Republicans supported the French, whereas the Federalists supported the British. Each party had its set of views. The Federalists supported a loose interpretation of the Constitution, a strong central government, high tariffs, a navy, military spending, a national debt, and a national bank (all ideas of the Treasury Secretary Alexander Hamilton)....   [tags: Political Science] 1136 words
(3.2 pages)
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Lincoln and the Republicans - ... The final step and where the ‘Ten Percent Plan’ moniker came from, was that once ten percent of the voting population took all both oaths, the state could begin to rebuild their state governments and would be re-admitted to the Union. The Republicans that controlled the Congress wanted to severely punish the Confederate states. They also feared that blacks would not continue to have their hard fought freedom and the strict southern social hierarchy would rebuild itself. To safeguard against this, they proposed a very strict policy of re-admittance....   [tags: American History]
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946 words
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Jeffersonian Republicans - Jeffersonian Republicans With respect to the federal constitution, the Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionists who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists. To what extent was this characterization of the two parties accurate during the presidencies of Jefferson and Madison. Before 1801, the Jeffersonian Republicans were usually strict constructionists of the constitution. However during the presidencies of Jefferson and Madison they had to adopt some Federalist ideas....   [tags: American History USA Government Essays Papers] 723 words
(2.1 pages)
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Democrats and Republicans View Points - ... Our views are changing each day as our culture is changing. Today nearly fifty percent of American’s support same-sex marriages. We are changing our views to be more accepting of all and that is why party stances on this issue are very subject to change. For majority of each party the following ideas are true. The Democratic Party is for same-sex marriage because they believe in supporting equality. They are the highest supporters for legal same-sex marriage, and propose same-sex couples should have the same legal rights as all other married couples....   [tags: Politics]
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1088 words
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The Democrats and The Republicans: On The Issues - ... state do not want any religious influence in the government and strive to create strong boundaries between the two. The Democratic Party embraces the right citizens have to religious freedom, the right to practice any religion of choice, or no religion, if that is the citizen’s choice. They believe that this freedom works so well because of the separation that has been created and without it, religious freedom could not excel and work as well as it does (Religious Freedom). The Democratic Party promotes a secular nation with secular issues in order to not entangle religion in government, as well as not to entangle government in religion....   [tags: Political Science]
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1685 words
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political views of federalists and republicans - The political views of the federalist and the republicans towards the government of the United States of America were different. The republicans stressed equality of rights among citizens allowing people to govern themselves. The federalists believed in a stronger government one in which was sovereign and had superior power over the local governments. The republicans view almost always proved to be a disaster but the republicans believed that if a republican government could succeed anywhere, it would be within the virtuous communities of the United States of America....   [tags: essays research papers] 357 words
(1 pages)
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Jeffersonian Republicans Vs. Federalists - As the young colonies of America broke away from their mother country and began to grow and develop into an effective democratic nation, many changes occurred. As the democracy began to grow, two main political parties developed, the Jeffersonian Republicans and the Federalists. Each party had different views on how the government should be run. The Jeffersonian Republicans believed in strong state governments, a weak central government, and a strict construction of the Constitution. The Federalists opted for a powerful central government with weaker state governments, and a loose interpretation of the Constitution....   [tags: essays research papers] 1170 words
(3.3 pages)
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The Jeffersonian Republicans And Federalists - The Jeffersonian Republicans and Federalists By 1817 the great American experiment was in full swing. America was developing into an effective democratic nation. However as the democracy continued to grow, two opposing political parties developed, the Jeffersonian Republicans and the Federalists. The Jeffersonian Republicans believed in strong state governments, a weak central government, and a strict interpretation of the Constitution. The Federalists saw it differently. They opted for a powerful central government with weaker state governments, and a loose interpretation of the Constitution....   [tags: American History] 1197 words
(3.4 pages)
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Political Cartoons and Republicans - Introduction The Republican Party was founded by a coalition in 1854 and was comprised of former members of the Whig, Free-Soil, and Know-Nothing parties. The slavery issue shattered America’s established political landscape and catapulted the Republicans from what seemed like nowhere straight into the White House in 1860. After Fremont’s attempt at winning the presidency in 1856, Lincoln won the election four years later, cementing the Republican Party’s desire for executive power. In the aftermath of the Civil War, the United States found itself politically gridlocked....   [tags: essays research papers fc] 2695 words
(7.7 pages)
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Were the Republicans Hypocrites? - • Daniel Webster defines a Hypocrite as “a person who puts on a false appearance of virtue or religion” • A Democratic-Republican opposes a strong central government with most power assigned to the states, Alexander Hamilton's economic policies, advocates a liberal agrarian democracy, a foreign policy favoring the French Revolution while also appealing to poor townsfolk. • Both Mr. Jefferson and I were firm believers of Republican ideals, but under the circumstances, we had to adapt to the issues that affected our presidencies....   [tags: essays research papers] 497 words
(1.4 pages)
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Jeffersonian Democratic Republicans - The Jeffersonian Democratic Republicans were characterized as strict constructionists. Which explains why they wanted the United States to be controlled by the states, not a central government. On August thirteenth eighteen hundred, Thomas Jefferson addressed the nation to let individual know that The United States was much too large to have a central government to direct the affairs of the nation. Meaning that we have the need of state officials and not just the national leaders. Therefore, we have independent states to handle the events and laws within the boundaries of each state....   [tags: History] 295 words
(0.8 pages)
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A Comparison of the Federalists and the Republicans - A Comparison of the Federalists and the Republicans Federalism a central feature of the American political system has long been an important issue. The nature of federalism has been shaped through the years by debates between prominent statesmen, laws, and Supreme Court decisions. When the colonies declared their independence from the Britain in 1776, they reacted against the British unitary system in which all political and economic power was concentrated in London. A major source of friction between the colonies and the mother country was the British attempt to reclaim powers previously granted to the colonial governments....   [tags: Papers] 346 words
(1 pages)
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Fiscal Fallacy: The Political Motives in the Current Union Assualt - ... [In this regard] one can view the whole neoliberal offensive of the last two decades as a gigantic effort to put the brakes to the increasing costs of production, first by reducing the cost of salaries and taxes and then by reducing the cost of input advances. (qtd in Castillo 71) As Castillo Observed, once Republicans put neoliberal policies into place, it lead to an accelerated and wide scale deindustrialization of the United States economy. This had several effects that all contributed to the weakening of private unions and thus the working class....   [tags: American Politics, Republicans] 2377 words
(6.8 pages)
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The Beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and the Loyalists/Unionists - The Beliefs of the Republicans/Nationalists and the Loyalists/Unionists There are a number of differences between Nationalists and Unionists and their beliefs. The Nationalists are predominantly Catholic and they do not want Ireland to be part of Britain. They see the British as an occupying army and most believe that the British have no right to be in Ireland, they think it's unfair that the British came into Ireland in the 1600s and have stayed there. They feel angry about how the British have persecuted the Catholics in the past, and they believe that they still don't get treated as well as the Unionists....   [tags: Papers] 5003 words
(14.3 pages)
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Global Warming - How Republicans are Endangering Our Earth - Global Warming – How Republicans are Endangering Our Earth Imagine the world's major cities completely underwater. Imagine storms so violent that parts of the world became unlivable. Theses are images that one would expect to find in movie house, but environmental scientists tell us what is now a good setting for science fiction could soon be reality due to global warming. Environmental scientists warn that humans are not only making the Earth inhabitable for animals and plants, but that if humans continues with their current practices, the Earth will soon be inhabitable for humans as well....   [tags: Climate Change, Greenhouse Gases]
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3448 words
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Chants Democratic - ... 31 & 57) The social change of employment within the American artisan guild rendered lower wages in the dawn of the economic changes seen during the nineteenth century. (pp. 5) The many small arguments in Chants Democratic acknowledged that along with the changing economy, the fall of Stollenwerck’s theory of craft structure, and each vocations’ interests gave rise to the first unionism of trades in 1794. The foregoing events severed most significant ties between masters and journeymen. (pp. 4 & 56) Wilentz identified that the only connection left between the two artisanal occupations laid in their ideological aspects of republicanism....   [tags: Literary Analysis]
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1198 words
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Philosophical And Historical Foundations Of American Politics - The Founding Father’s views on government were influenced by both the classical republican and the natural rights philosophers. The two groups of philosophers held very different views on how a government should run. The classical republicans believed that the individual should sacrifice his or her personal freedoms in order to gain the greater good. The natural rights philosophers, on the other hand, held that a person’s individual freedoms out to be preserved at all costs. The two greatest examples of historical precedent in republican government were the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, which both gave the people a great deal of power in the government by allowing them a voice....   [tags: essays research papers] 585 words
(1.7 pages)
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How the American Revolution Changed American Society - From 1763 to 1789 the American Colonies underwent a radical transformation into an independent self governing nation. British debt accumulated from the French and Indian War brought colonists into conflict with the mother country over a variety of social, political and economic issues. However, the outcome of the American Revolution was not a radical departure from America had been prior to 1763 but later, with the introduction of the constitution, developed unto a revolutionary society. At the end of the American Revolutionary War in 1789, the colonies were free from British rule and a new nation was born....   [tags: Essays on American Revolution] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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Practicing Decentered Radical Democratic Citizenship in a Decentered State - What is a citizen and where does she practice her citizenship. These questions cannot be answered unless accompanied by sufficient knowledge of how different types of citizenships are formed and how these citizenships are practiced. There is not one singular type of citizen that permeates the world or even the United States—an intermingled and enmeshed notion of citizenship is acted out through a combination of rights and duties as the citizen attempts to hold onto those values that are most important to them....   [tags: Sociology ]
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The Transformation of the American Colonies - From 1763 to 1789 the American Colonies underwent a radical transformation becoming an independent self-governing nation. The British debt accumulated from the French and Indian War brought colonists into conflict with the mother country over a variety of social, political and economic issues. This turmoil pushed the colonials to fight for their independence and develop a government that would counter these problems. With the introduction of the constitution, the American Revolution initiated a radical departure from the America prior to 1763 when it developed unto a revolutionary society....   [tags: American History ] 1701 words
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The Greatest Founding Father - Thomas Jefferson - The American Revolution, perhaps the most momentous war-related milestone in American history, would not have been possible without the strenuous efforts of the courageous men we call Patriots or otherwise known as the Founding Fathers of America, who gave their all in the fight for freedom against the British. Many names of great men come to mind when we think “founding fathers,” such as Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, or Samuel Adams. Yet there is still one great patriot and founding father who seems to stand out above the rest, and that man is Thomas Jefferson....   [tags: Biography] 649 words
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The Government During the Age of Absolutism and the Enlightenment - During the Age of Absolutism, views of how government should have been run were drastically different that the views of Enlightenment thinkers. The fundamental difference between these two views of government – absolutism and Enlightenment – was that, in an absolute view of government, it stated that it should be run by a monarch – such as a king or a queen – and that he or she should have complete and unquestionable authority over everything, whereas the Enlightenment resulted in the development of new ideas, many of which criticized absolute monarchies, such as the idea that the fundamental function of government was to protect it's people's rights....   [tags: Age of Absolutism, government, ] 732 words
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Gordon Wood’s Radicalism of the American Revolution - Gordon Wood’s Radicalism of the American Revolution is a book that extensively covers the origin and ideas preceding the American Revolution. Wood’s account of the Revolution goes beyond the history and timeline of the war and offers a new encompassing look inside the social ideology and economic forces of the war. Wood explains in his book that America went through a two-stage progression to break away from the Monarchical rule of the English. He believes the pioneering revolutionaries were rooted in the belief of an American Republic....   [tags: Essays on American Revolution]
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1486 words
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Thomas Jefferson: Pragmatics over Doctrine - Thomas Jefferson: Pragmatics over Doctrine During the period 1800-1817, the Jeffersonians to a great extent compromised their political principles and essentially “out Federalized the Federalists”. While traditional Jeffersonian Republicanism advocated a strict interpretation of the Constitution and an emphasis on an agrarian economic system, the actual policies of Presidents Thomas Jefferson and James Madison were markedly different from their theoretical principles. This obvious compromise of Jeffersonian principles is evident in the Federal government’s assumption of broad-based political powers and institution of capitalistic Hamiltonian economic reforms, both of which stemmed from Jefferson and Madison’s adoption of broad constructionist policies....   [tags: Cheathouse Essays] 624 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Conservative Movement - ... Eisenhower also made endeavors to eliminate conflict among racial and economic groups, and promoted prosperity, peace, and social harmony (Story and Laurie 4). Conservatism in the 1950s was also promoted by writers. One of the writers who strongly opposed liberalism was Russell Kirk. Russell’s conservatism was influenced by the fact that he viewed both traditional and modern liberalism as acts that are of great significance as regards economic matters. According to him, liberalism did not take care of spiritual aspects of man....   [tags: U.S. Politics ]
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The Political Climate of the 1950s - The Political Climate of the 1950s With the dropping of the Atomic bomb that ended WWII and the beginning of the Cold War, there was an irony of stability and turmoil in the United States. The start of the 1950s brought about many changes, from the Red Scare and threat of the possible spread of communism in America, to changes in political movements, civil rights movements, and another possible war, there were many significant events and people during this time.      Joseph R. McCarthy was a Republican Senator from Wisconsin with an enormous political agenda....   [tags: History Historical Politics USA Essays]
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The New Science of Politics - The New Science of Politics When discussing the new science of politics laid out in the Federalist papers, it is imperative to understand that proponents of the Constitution had various reasons for writing these papers, not the least of which was convincing critics that a strong central government that would not oppress but actually protect individual freedoms as well as encouraging the state of New York to agree to ratify the Constitution. The Federalists had a genuine belief that a strong central government was essential to the protection of what they saw as God given rights and freedoms, as well as protection from abuse from the states concerning these freedoms....   [tags: Papers] 813 words
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Montesquieu's Greatest Mark on Philosophy - Doubtless, if Montesquieu were forced to choose a favorite mathematical formula, he would pick the average function. For even among the great thinkers of the French Enlightenment, the baron de Montesquieu stands out as an especially impassioned advocate for moderation. Montesquieu, of course, left his greatest mark on the philosophy of the governance through his great work The Spirit of the Laws. Though certainly his earlier work The Persian Letters sowed the seeds of many of the ideas featured in his chef d’œuvre....   [tags: Philosophy]
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The Impact of Philosophy on Government - ... We can also appreciate in his book the early modern republicanism. He can be given the credit for giving a rebirth to the Ancient Roman Republic. His ideas of Republicanism, especially the ones related to civil virtue are one of the most predominant in today’s political scene and have contributed tremendously to the foundation of American political values. Thomas Hobbes is one of the most influential political philosophers of all times, he wrote a book named The Leviathan, in which he explained the nature, and the goal of the government and why it was important to have what he called a “cement” between the people and their acceptance of a central government for their mutual advantage....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Electoral College: Tyranny of the Majority - ... When a citizen casts their vote at a local voting booth, they are not voting directly for the President, but are voting for a state elector who has “pledged” to vote for the candidate. There are currently 538 electors, and a vote of 270, the majority, is required to win the Presidency (Longley). Because congressional representation is based on population of the state, the larger states receive more votes for the President. The candidate to receive the most popular votes in each state will win all of that state’s electoral votes, creating an “all or nothing system”....   [tags: Politics]
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Women's Studies - ... Republicanism was to emerge later (Glenn 7). Liberalism, as a political thought, entails the plurality of actors in the international political arena. These include ‘the State’, ‘Individuals’ and ‘supranational institutions.’ It is of the view that state interactions are not limited to the “Higher politics” – covering all matters vital to the survival of the state i.e. national and international security; but also to the “Lower politics” – pertaining to economics, culture, religion and other social issues....   [tags: Analysis, Evelyn Nakano Glenn] 1440 words
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Art History - In the early 1700s, the monarchies failures at finance, national debt, involvement in multiple wars with little care given to veterans and rising unemployment inflamed the people. When coupled with the monarchies lifestyles of lavish spending on countless mistresses, flouting morals, excessive parties at court, and political favors, the popularity of royalty was quickly disintegrating. The irresponsibility of the aristocracy was no longer ignored, and a movement was beginning. This set the stage for political change....   [tags: Art ] 502 words
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Lincoln, Labor and Liberation - Lincoln, Labor and Liberation The free labor ideology of the nineteenth century was grounded in the beliefs that Northern free labor was superior to Southern slave labor. The key factor that made this system unique was “the opportunity it offers wage earners to rise to property-owning independence.” [1] It was this free labor ideology and not the republicanism of the Revolutionary War era that caused slavery to be problematic by the time of the Civil War. This ideology was comprehensive—it had economic, social, moral, and political aspects....   [tags: United States History Labor Work Essays]
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Emancipation Proclamation - Emancipation Proclamation In Free Soil, Free Labor, Free Men, by Eric Foner, a new political party of the period of the mid-1800's is examined. This was a party that had the partnership of the President of the United States, Abraham Lincoln. It was not only his beliefs but the beliefs of this political party, the republican party, that helped build tension into what would become the Civil War. It was founded as a pro-active party, a party of doers, not sayers. They wanted people to act on behalf of their beliefs and make a change in the world....   [tags: Papers] 618 words
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Jefferson And Madison And Federalism - John Adams was the last Federalist president which led to the next 16 years of Thomas Jefferson as president for two terms and James Madison as president for two terms. Jefferson and Madison were members of the Republican Party, which had principles and philosophies that were very different than the views of the Federalists. Jefferson and Madison each abandoned the Republican philosophies for Federalism. Jefferson and Madison took on Federalist views while being President of the United States. However, Jefferson and Madison each picked somewhere to stand their ground and keep some of their Republican views....   [tags: Political Science] 916 words
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Audrey Hofstadter Summary: The Founding Fathers: The Age of Realism - Audrey Hofstadter Summary: The Founding Fathers: The Age of Realism Summary of Section: I The reasoning behind the Constitution of the United States is presented as 'based upon the philosophy of Hobbes and the religion of Calvin. It assumes the natural state of mankind in a state of war, and that the carnal mind is at enmity with God.' Throughout, the struggle between democracy and tyranny is discussed as the Founding Fathers who envisioned the Constitution in Philadelphia in 1787 believed not in total democracy, but instead saw common man as selfish and contemptuous, and therefore in need of a 'a good political constitution to control him.' Being a largely propertied body, with the exception of William Few, who was the only one who could honestly be said to represent the majority yeoman farmer class, the highly privileged classes were fearful of granting man his due rights, as the belief that 'man was an unregenerate rebel who has to be controlled' reverberated....   [tags: Founding Fathers History Summary Essays Papers]
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A Rising in Dublin in 1916 - A Rising in Dublin in 1916 In 1916 on Easter Monday there was a rising against the British. The rising was a bid for independence from Britain and was led by a secret republican organisation known as the Irish Republican Brotherhood. The rising failed in the short term but the long-term effects led to the establishment of an Irish Republic. In this essay I will discuss the long and short term causes of the rising including the revival of the Irish culture and the growth of republicanism among the general public....   [tags: Papers] 932 words
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The Causes of the American Revolution - The colonists of America slowly came to realize that they must break from Britain due to the growing feeling of being considered unequal to the British. They realized they had no say in government, and under the rule of Britain, they would never be able to prosper. The conditions of their rights slowly disintegrated, as the construction of parliament becomes more and more powerful and intolerable. The language used to protest british, throughout the time, leading up to the revolutionary war, were legal, and political, but the primary cause would have been economics....   [tags: Essays on American Revolution] 1537 words
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The Third French Republic - In the years from 1871 to 1914, France saw many social changes, economic and cultural, under the new government of the Third Republic. France experienced the modernization of its rural areas, the centralization of the state, and the emergence of a mass media culture. Furthermore, internationally France was heavily involved in the European race to imperialize in Africa and Asia. political participation in the international arena, which at the time was heavily involved in the race for imperial expansion in Africa and Asia....   [tags: European History] 601 words
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The Degree of Success of Reza Shah Pahlavi after the 1925 Coup - The Degree of Success of Reza Shah Pahlavi after the 1925 Coup “A passionate but ruthless nationalist with little formal education, Reza Khan had a clear vision for Iran’s transition to modernity often using Ataturk’s Turkey as a model.” - Milani, Mohsen M. The Making of Iran’s Islamic Revolution. Iran entered the interwar period in a troubled state. Iran’s economy was devastated and its current ruler Ahmad Shah seemed to have little authority over his country as it was in effect governed by the ruling powers Britain and Russia....   [tags: Papers] 1555 words
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Causes of The American Revolution - The period before the American Revolution was characterized by a series of social as well as political shifts that occurred in American society as new republican principles took hold in the gentry of the colonies. That time era distinguished the sharp political debates between radicals and moderates over the role that democracy should play in a government. This broad new American shift to republicanism and a newfound support of democracy was a catastrophe to the traditional social hierarchy, which characterized an old mixed government in the Americas....   [tags: Essays on American Revolution] 986 words
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Federalists VS Jeffersoneans - Federalists VS Jeffersoneans With respect to the federal Constitution, the Jeffersonian Republicans are usually characterized as strict constructionists who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists. As history dictates, this is found to be substantially accurate. Federalists were firm believers in the production of a strong central government and a broad interpretation of the Constitution. However, the Democratic Republicans believed that the government should follow a strict interpretation of the Constitution and held the idea that this would allow honest representation of the people and prevent government corruption....   [tags: essays papers]
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The Reconstruction of the Union - ... The governors of most of the seceded States attempted to call their legislatures together to conform to the results of the war and take steps for their restoration to the Union. They did this, believing that the American principle of government--the sovereignty and indestructibility of the States--would be respected and that these prompt proceedings would be favored as the constitutional plan of restoration. They did this also believing it necessary to preserve civil government, and to show by legislative enactment complete submission to the results of the war in repealing their ordinances of secession and in accepting the freedom of the Negro (Civil war Home, 2002)....   [tags: U.S. History ]
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Lincoln's view on Slavery and How it Evolved - ... The North’s strong moral opposition to slavery was due to the influence of the Second Great Awakening which introduced the idea that slavery was a sin. This message became accepted in the North because their economy did not rely heavily on slave labor. The South never accepted the belief that slavery was a sin, it was too threatening to their way of life. The differences in the economies of the North and South greatly influenced their views on slavery. On October 13, 1858 during their sixth and seventh Lincoln-Douglas debates Lincoln states that the main difference in the views of the two parties was that Republicans believed slavery was morally, socially, and politically wrong and Democrats believed it not to be....   [tags: U.S. History]
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Articles Of Confederation - Articles of Confederation Analyze the degree to which the Articles provided an effective form of government with respect to any two of the following: Foreign Relations, Economic Conditions, or Western Lands In 1777, the states enacted the Articles of Confederation to preserve democracy and prevent tyranny from those who sought to centralize power. But in their efforts to keep their independence, the states created a weak central government that was unable to improve an insolvent economy and poor foreign relations....   [tags: essays research papers] 564 words
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Tim Murphy and the 18th Pennsylvania District - Tim Murphy is a Republican house member hailing from the 18th Congressional district of the state of Pennsylvania. He has an impressive professional and political background, earning his Ph.D. from the University of Pittsburgh, practicing as a psychologist for many years, and serving as a Pennsylvania state senator from 1996-2002 before successfully running for U.S. House of Representatives. His political views closely match those of his constituents, a fact that has allowed him to be a representative for eight years, and he is favored to win re-election for another term later this year....   [tags: Politics ]
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Progress, Not Always a Good Thing - ... One road to progress was linking the western part of NY to NYC and from there the world. By doing such republican virtue would be triumphing over nature, forcing nature to bend to the American will, because "nature stood for the opposite of civilization-it existed where humans, and art, had not yet made their impact on the landscape" (Sheriff, 60 ). The idealized notion of triumph over nature goes hand in hand with the republican idea of the agrarian society where everyone is a farmer able to support their own family....   [tags: U.S. History]
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The Yemen Conflict - ... On the other hand, Saudi Arabia viewed the involvement of Egyptian troops in the conflict as a threat to its oilfields and its monarchy (Terrill and Army War College (U.S.) Strategic Studies Institute 54). The United Nations as an intergovernmental organization also played a huge role in the conflict in Yemen. The United Nations acted as one of the venues where Yemen expressed its dissatisfactions and complains. For example, in 1964, Yemen wrote to the UN Security Council accusing the UK of committing over forty aggressive acts....   [tags: International Conflict ]
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French Revolution - Motives of Committee of Public Safety - French Revolution - Motives of Committee of Public Safety Essay Topic: Discuss the motives of the Committee of Public Safety and the role they played in the running of France (up to 27 July 1794) "Anarchy within, invasion without. A country cracking from outside pressure, disintegrating from internal strain. Revolution at its height" This was the country the Committee of Public Safety ("The committee"), inherited and it was announced their mission by the Convention, to "create a viable (republican) state amid political turmoil" , by means of intimidation and ultimately terror, indeed the proclamation of "terror as the order of the day" so as to establish a peaceful, stable government for the introduction of the constitution....   [tags: European Europe History] 716 words
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Death of a Salesman - Samuel Adams was born on September 27, 1722, Boston, Massachusetts Samuel Adams was a son to a merchant who sold things in Boston. When he graduated from Harvard College in 1740, his ideas about a useful career were not many : he did not want to become a brewer, fate (or ill luck) forced Adams into the brewery; he operated his father's malt house for a livelihood but not as a dedicated businessman, and the idea of working a Church didn’t interest Samuel Adams much either. Adams was not a good merchant like his father and didn’t like the idea of becoming one....   [tags: essays research papers] 620 words
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european renaissance - History has shown us how civilizations evolve over time. Broadly interpreted, the age of Diocletian marked a decisive stage in the transition from the classical, the Greco-Roman, civilization of the ancient Roman Empire to the Christian-Germanic civilization of the early Middle Ages. Similarly interpreted, "the age of the Renaissance marked the transition from the civilization of the Middle Ages to the modern world"(Ferguson 1). Therefore, the Renaissance is the beginning of the modern world and modern government....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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Comparing Beliefs and Vaules of the Renaissance and Middle Ages - Comparing Beliefs and Vaules of the Renaissance and Middle Ages There are many contrasts in the beliefs and values of the Renaissance and the Middle Ages. The Middle Ages was a time of great suffering, including famine and widespread disease. The Renaissance, however, was a revival of art, learning, and literature. Their views of the purpose of life in the present world and man's place in the world was, perhaps, the greatest contrast. However, their views on politics, religion, and education were very different as well....   [tags: Beliefs Renaissance Middle Ages Values Essays] 740 words
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The Enlightenment - The history of Western civilization cannot be neatly divided into precise linear sections. Instead, it must be viewed as a series of developing threads that combine, interact, and, at various intervals, take pervasive shifts. The Enlightenment of the eighteenth century was one of these paradigm historical shifts, challenging the traditional notions of authority by investing reason with the power to change the human condition for the better. This ecumenical emphasis on reason and independent thought led to an explosion of change and development across science, philosophy, religion, and politics....   [tags: Cultural History]
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A Phenomenal Figure: Jean-Jacques Rousseau - A Phenomenal Figure: Jean-Jacques Rousseau The enlightenment era was a time where many philosophers lived. Their works helped benefit society and the bewilderment the state lived in. In this era, enlightenment thinkers were identified to give basis to philosophy that was independent from tradition, culture and religion. These philosophers were known to have written theories on politics, education, society, nature, nurture, etc. A critical philosopher from that era who attacked all these ideas and many more was Jean Jacques Rousseau....   [tags: Philosohpy]
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Comparing Going Dutch and Worlds of Wonder - Although there are many contrasts to the works, a close examination reveals similarities. Jardine and Hall discuss continuous communication across space as a way of transmitting culture and ideas. In both books, a body of water, the narrow sea and the Atlantic oceans represents the space that provides the media for transference. As culture impacts art and vice versa, both scholars focus on a particular art form or multiple art forms contributing to a mutual marriage. This cultural relationship is strengthened by ongoing exchange....   [tags: Compare Contrast] 1466 words
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Tradition, Terrain, and Turkism: A Study on the Reform of the Imperial Ottoman Army and its Effects on the Outcome of World War I’s Gallipoli Campaign - Beginning in 1839 under Mahmud II, massive political, military, and social reforms took place in the Ottoman Empire, centered on westernizing practices as an attempt to stave off imperial weakening and collapse. Having spent centuries in slow decline, being forced to ally with European nations in order to succeed at war, several military and territorial losses, social turmoil, and economic ruin, numerous western experts were invited, institutions adopted, and various reforms begun within the empire....   [tags: World History ]
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The Mediterranean Society of the Greeks and Romans - ... Although the Greek established many city-states throughout Europe, they never relied upon a centralized city. Instead they relied on communication and trade with their surrounding cities. Within this communication, the Greeks established mass trade due in fact to the variety of products each city could produce. Rome which was originally ran by a single king, was an empire founded between the eighth and sixth century B.C.E. Later on, Rome ended the monarchy and created a republic which was a form of government in which the delegates represented the interests of various constituencies (Bentley, et al., 2008)....   [tags: World Civilization ]
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Causes and Effects of the American Revolution - ... The Sugar Act of 1764 placed an import tax on sugar coming into the colonies, and it also created a vice-admiralty court for smugglers. “These were special courts…where a trained judge, appointed to serve at the Crown’s pleasure, would have the only say.” Defendants were not allowed a jury trial, another republican red flag. Around the same time, Parliament passed the Quartering Act. “This law required that each colonial assembly appropriate money to house the troops and supply their needs.” Not only did the colonists not want troops in the colonies, they now had to pay for them....   [tags: Essays on American Revolution]
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Our Founding Fathers Effect on the Past, Present, and Future - ... On September 13, 1788, Congress determined that the city of New York should be the seat of the new government. The capital was moved Philadelphia in 1790 and to Washington D.C. in the year 1800 where it remains today (Lawler 2010). The process for the creation of the new government continued when George Washington was unanimously elected the first president, and John Adams of Massachusetts, the vice president. Adams arrived in New York on April 21, and was sworn into office on the same day. Washington arrived in New York on April 23, and was sworn into office on April 30, 1789 (Timeline of the Early Republic 2011)....   [tags: Government]
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Our Founding Fathers Affect on the Past, Present, and Future - ... in the year 1800 where it remains today (Lawler 2010). The process for the creation of the new government continued when George Washington was unanimously elected the first president, and John Adams of Massachusetts, the vice president. Adams arrived in New York on April 21, and was sworn into office on the same day. Washington arrived in New York on April 23, and was sworn into office on April 30, 1789 (Timeline of the Early Republic 2011). The creation of the new government was complete. Our Government Today One hundred years ago, people did not want the government to save them from everything....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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Our Founding Fathers Affect on the Past, Present, and Future - ... in the year 1800 where it remains today (Lawler 2010). The process for the creation of the new government continued when George Washington was unanimously elected the first president, and John Adams of Massachusetts, the vice president. Adams arrived in New York on April 21, and was sworn into office on the same day. Washington arrived in New York on April 23, and was sworn into office on April 30, 1789 (Timeline of the Early Republic 2011). The creation of the new government was complete. One hundred years ago, people did not want the government to save them from everything....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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Our Founding Fathers Affect on the Past, Present, and Future - ... The process for the creation of the new government continued when George Washington was unanimously elected the first president, and John Adams of Massachusetts, the vice president. Adams arrived in New York on April 21, and was sworn into office on the same day. Washington arrived in New York on April 23, and was sworn into office on April 30, 1789 (Timeline of the Early Republic 2011). The creation of the new government was complete. One hundred years ago, people did not want the government to save them from everything....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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Our Founding Fathers Affect on the Past, Present, and Future - ... Adams arrived in New York on April 21, and was sworn into office on the same day. Washington arrived in New York on April 23, and was sworn into office on April 30, 1789 (Timeline of the Early Republic 2011). The creation of the new government was complete. One hundred years ago, people did not want the government to save them from everything. There was no social security, Medicare, or Medicaid. Welfare programs were localized affairs. Communication and travel were still slow which slowed the pace the government could do anything....   [tags: U.S. Government ]
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Exceptional Down to the Bone - ... The second bone level feature “is a culture’s inheritance practices” (Bennett 37). The third bone-level is whether adult children form their own households” (Bennett 37). Bennett describes these features as our deep cultural roots that separate our American exceptionalism from other English-speaking countries. We think that these points show how we forget what it means to be an American, in America we can marry who ever we wish, we are allowed to leave are belongings to any person we wish, we could leave it to a dog if we wanted, and when kids grow up they move out and start their own family....   [tags: Article Analysis, Bennett] 1059 words
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The Myth of the Old West - ... This “cattle act” which was enacted in 1855, could not be reasonably enforced and therefore failed. The reason that it could not be enforced was because the cattle herders often bribed the justices of the peace, who were given the authority to impound and destroy animals infected with “cattle fever” (Terrell 189). Disappointed by their failure to regulate the influx of cattle, the Missouri state legislature passed a more stringent law in 1861, in which each county would be allocated the authority to form boards which would inspect all livestock entering the county....   [tags: American History, Cowboys] 2022 words
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Thomas Paine - ... He would later move into a small house above a tobacco shop, and four years later, ended up marrying the daughter of the store’s owner, Elizabeth Ollive. It was then that Thomas began to get involved with civic matters and such. He joined the excise officers, or men who were responsible for collecting taxes. They began asking Parliament for superior working conditions and elevated salaries. However, Paine was fired from this job from neglecting his post without being authorized to do so. Subsequently to this, his inherited tobacco shop also folded, leaving him with little to no income....   [tags: History ]
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Gothic Revival - ... Immanuel Kant added a unified and comprehensive philosophical system on Aesthetics. Later, he used the term “designating the critique of taste” instead of “aesthetic,” in order to note the essential differences between judgments of taste, moral judgments, and scientific judgments (Immanuel Kant, Observations on the Feelings of the Beautiful and Sublime. Germany, 1764.). In The Picturesque, Gilpin expanded more on the meaning of Picturesque based on his knowledge of landscape painting scenes, where texture and composition were the focus parts of a “correctly picturesque” scene....   [tags: Art History] 1651 words
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James Madison and the Federalist Papers - ... In his essay, Madison advocated a republic system of government instead of a democracy because it “promises the cure for which [they are] seeking.” According to Madison, in a republic, unlike in a democracy, a “small number of citizens [are] elected by the rest.” In other words, one difference between a republic and a democracy is the fact that a republic is based on representation, while a democracy is based on the rule of the majority (mob rule). Madison favors the republic form of government because representation (republic) recognized the inalienable rights of all individuals, while democracy is only concerned with the views or needs of the majority....   [tags: Federalist Papers] 739 words
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An Essay on the Constitution - ... Disgruntled merchants complained of the lack of regulation, while frustrated merchants fussed on the tariffs that were put on foreign goods. Plus, an executive was added to implement that laws made by congress. Formerly, congress would make laws that the states could simply ignore. Thence, the executive could use his power to make sure these laws were acted upon and followed by using officials to check on the states. Accordingly, all the changes brought up by the conventions led to adjustments in original plans for the new government....   [tags: American Constitution] 1036 words
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Strict/Loose Jacksonian Democracy - Based on the following doctrines, I believe the extent of characterization of the two parties was not completely accurate during the presidencies of Madison and Jefferson, because of key pieces of evidence that proves inconsistencies during the period between 1801 and 1817. In the following essay, I will provide information supporting my thesis, which describes the changing feelings by each party and the reasoning behind such changes. The Democratic/Republican party proved to be both strict and loose in their adhering to the documents in many ways....   [tags: Politics Government Political Science] 1064 words
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Jefferson and Hamilton - The post-revolutionary war period of the Unites States saw the establishment of the first party system and an enlarging gap in viewpoints between the wealthy and the common man. The contradictory views of Alexander Hamilton and Thomas Jefferson were primarily responsible for the rise of political parties from 1783-1800. Alexander Hamilton exerted the most influence in the new Federalist Party. He believed that only an enlightened ruling class could produce a stable and effective federal government....   [tags: essays research papers] 978 words
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LIES (under the microscope) AND THE LYING (as far as I’m concerned) LIARS (Republicans) THAT TELL THEM (all the time) - Al Franken has written a liberal masterpiece of epic proportions. If any individual should fail to understand the “obvious conservative bias in the media” or “the Bush Administrations total lack of competence and initiation of ‘Operation Ignore’” they need only to pick up Lies And The Lying Liars Who Tell Them to get their facts straight. From page one Al Franken launches into a very detailed, volatile, humorous, self-patronizing, and sometimes lewd all out assault on the extreme right. His first victim to fall is Ann Coulter, who I must admit, completely deserved the endless onslaught provided by Franken....   [tags: Literature Review] 964 words
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Madison And Jefferson's Federalist Ideas - From 1801-1817 there was a clear separation of the United States. The Federalist and Democratic-Republican parties were in strong opposition of one another. Though the Republicans were usually characterized as strict constructionists, who were opposed to the broad constructionism of the Federalists, both Jefferson and Madison's presidencies highlighted Federalist ideals in many of their decisions. This included Jefferson's unconstitutional decision in purchasing the vast Louisiana territory and Madison's… The standard Democratic-Republican had many beliefs in which followed the Constitution whole heartily....   [tags: Political Science] 952 words
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The Evolution of American Self - The American Self is the common character and values of American people which evolved depending on governmental philosophy, religious belief, and economical aspiration from beginning of its formation to the present. Any of the change in the above factors would contribute to the evolution of the American Self. Over time, the American Self changed from communalism, whole hearted religious faith, and interest in material goods to individualism, self interests, and greed. The American Self depended on the governmental philosophy held by its early colonial leaders, the Founding Fathers, and the later elites who governed the nation....   [tags: American History] 886 words
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