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God and Government - ... Although the pride eventually led to discrimination and genocide, it was still efficient nonetheless. English statesman William Penn said that, “Those who will not be governed by God, will be ruled by tyrants.” A government that has no religion mixed in will not recognize God as the Sovereign Ruler (Hicks 1987, 27), so the tyrant takes the roles just as Hitler did. Complete separation of faith and politics can be dangerous for citizens, especially religious citizens. A government that has completely integrated with religion can become lost in itself very easily....   [tags: Religion]
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1538 words
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Buddhism - ... The strong emphasis of truth means that one must come to understand one their own: “Buddhism encourages us not to believe what we’ve been told is the truth, but instead to seek the truth through our own experience.” The third and fourth reasons for the acceptance of biological evolution are the general acceptance of impermanence and the belief in continuity of evolution and dharma. Spirits and beings continue to evolve throughout time and there is never one entity that stays the same no matter what....   [tags: Religion]
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1899 words
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The Similarities and Differences between Buddhism, Jainism and Hinduism - ... However, Jainism assumes that the soul parts from the body when it does to be re-incarnated into something (or somebody) else, which means Jains do not recognize the unity of soul and body. This is actually the principle of all three religions—they pose little value to the human life because all followers believe that the soul will still remain in the human world, but will only change its appearance once re-incarnated into some other being or object. (McKay et al., 2008) Hinduism fully shares the idea of the life cycle and re-incarnation, as all were essentially derived from the Brahman tradition....   [tags: Religion]
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1179 words
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What is Scientology? - ... One does not have a thetan, something one keeps somewhere apart from oneself; one is a thetan. The thetan is the person himself, not his body or his name or the physical universe, his mind or anything else. It is that which is aware of being aware; the identity which IS the individual. (“Glossary”) It is this thetan, that Scientologists believe adjoins with matter, energy, space, and time to create life. Salvation, in Scientology, much like eastern religions, is also immediate and can be attained through increasing one’s spiritual awareness, but in contrast to eastern religions the church states that this spiritual awakening can only be achieved through Scientology’s religious services, including expensive courses, as opposed to eastern religions who believe that personal meditation can take the individual to the same spiritual place....   [tags: Religion ]
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1962 words
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Faith-Based Funding - ... This is one of the reasons why the proponents of the Faith-Based Community Initiative rely on success rates over anything else, because everything else is a logistical nightmare. Unnecessary Few critics deny that religion and various FBOs assist individuals spiritually, emotionally and physically. However, it is important to understand which organizations stand to benefit from the Faith-Based Community Initiatives. The larger FBO which has a history of successful social programs such as Habitat for Humanity and various Catholic organizations already have a firm grip on how to receive government grants....   [tags: Religion]
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Baruch Spinoza: The Beginning of Freedom of Religious Thought within Judaism - ... His work became better known and slowly influenced the way Jews understood the importance of freedom of religious thought. Now that it is clear how Spinoza’s ideas infiltrated Jewish circles, it is important to understand what these ideas were and why these radical ideas caught on. Some of Spinoza’s most important contributions include a desire to demonstrate the importance of challenging religious norms and authority, the idea that independent thinkers are valuable for establishing and maintaining political authority and the idea that religion should be looked at critically, not just with bling faith, are all contributions that allowed for the Jewish Enlightenment to take off in the 19th century, secular forms of Judaism to be established, as well as established a basis for freedom of religious thought....   [tags: Religion]
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Should Intelligent Design be Taught in Public Schools? - ... Maybe passing for science is not that important. Maybe, according to CEO of the Institute for Creation Research Henry Morris III, science is in fact the philosophy. Does evolution really have enough backing to be imposed as boldly as it is. According to Morris, the “embarrassing” evidence yields little proof in fossil records that evolution happened, and worse yet, the evidence cannot even show that evolution is happening right now. The scientists, however, brutally rejected findings from the Discovery Institute that shed light on this fallacy, refusing to “sit down, even behind closed doors, and discuss, peer-to-peer, the scientific data.” Morris is kind enough to establish a disclaimer that “teachers who do not believe the Bible should not be asked to teach the Bible.” Michael Behe, a professor of biochemistry at Lehigh University and an influential proponent of intelligent design, provides details that point out legitimate flaws in Darwin’s theory that may point to a creator (Intelligent)....   [tags: Religion]
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Were De Valera’s personal Catholic views responsible for the religious elements in the Irish Constitution? - ... These close family ties could suggest that this was De Valera trying to put his own personal stamp on the new constitution. It seems likely that he first became casually involved in the drafting of the constitution in autumn of 1936. It is obvious that De Valera took Dr. McQuaid’s council to be very important, as he is quoted to have said “The parts he approved of then have never been questioned, the parts he disapproved of have been criticised. ” From early in the next year McQuaid was corresponding with De Valera on a very regular basis, sometimes even twice a day, about suggestions and ideas that should be put into the constitution....   [tags: Religion]
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1354 words
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Atheism as an Evolution of Thought and its Place Among the Religious Multitude - ... Atheistic thought abandons even this small measure of control by admitting man’s diminutive place in the totality of existence and instead submitting completely to nature as it is. Today atheism is moving out of the relative isolation of scholarly debate and beginning to work its way into the perception of the public at large. The advancement of atheism is in large part due to the work of passionate advocates known as the new atheists. These men and women are proud of their atheistic life philosophy, so they work actively to spread their knowledge in a world dominated by theistic beliefs....   [tags: Religion ]
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2049 words
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The Evolution of Buddhism - ... Professor Ch’en describes the four noble truths best when ha says “Life is suffering. Suffering has a cause. Suffering can be suppressed. The way to suppression of suffering is the noble eight fold path, which consists of right view, right intention, right speech, right action, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration,” (CH'EN 33). The teachings of the Buddha held a person to high morals and conduct. If a person went against these values, it would be considered the ultimate sin and would, therefore, be trapped in the vicious cycle of rebirth....   [tags: Religion]
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Christianity and Chinese Stability - ... With such strong assertions, it is clear that as Christianity expands in China, the future stability of the government in Chinese society will increase due to higher respect of the Communist party as China’s divinely appointed rulers. In light of this information, one can also conclude that reconciliation of the Three-Self Patriotic Movement with house churches is possible if government officials understand that all Chinese Christians see the Communist government as God’s appointed steward of the Chinese people....   [tags: Religion]
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1959 words
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Gnosticism - Gnosticism, which was viewed as a threat to early Christian beliefs can be defined as the “thought and practice especially of various cults of late pre Christian and early Christian centuries distinguished by the conviction that matter is evil and that emancipation comes through gnosis (King, p.5).” Besides the dictionary’s condensed definition summarizing Gnosticism, “Gnosticism” is a much more complex belief composed of numerous myths defining humans and God and viewed as an ancient Christian heresy....   [tags: Religion]
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Unitarian Universalism - ... By 1850s, Universalist claimed to have 800,000 members all throughout the states. (Cassara) Unitarian churches around the 1800’s were more organized in structure due to the differences in their social and educational standings in comparison to the Universalist. The American Unitarian Association established the Beacon Press at 1854. The Beacon Press opened the door to Unitarians to religious expression by means of pamphlets containing hymns, prayers and advices. Influential works of Emerson and Channing came from this printing press achieved their goal of “social reforms such as temperance, [slave] abolition, women’s rights, and the education of the working class.” (Wilson) The present form of the UUA denomination maintains 214,738 members under 1,010 churches ....   [tags: Religion]
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Unitarianism and Trandentalism - What is God's role in the universe. This question has been on the tip os scholar's tongue and deep in the ind of man since time's beginning. during the eighteenth century, modern expansions swapped this accepted wisdom into, "Could God be the universe?" From this perspective, both Unitarianism and trandentalism arose during the Second Great Awakening. While both movements are reasoned reactions to the spiritual revival, Unitarianism judges the world more on logic, and transcendtalists are much more free-spirited....   [tags: Religion] 579 words
(1.7 pages)
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Chinese Schools of Thought - ... Modern Daoism- came into being during the 1940s to 1980s when Daoism was vehemently suppressed alongside other Marxist movements and religions. The monks and priests were sent to labor camps and the artifacts grossly destroyed. It was not until Deng Xiaoping restored some religious tolerance and the communists recognized Daoism as a legitimate religion (James Miller, 2009 ). Contemporary Daoism-Here Daoism started to be practiced. Daoism aimed at achieving immortality through breathing, meditation, helping others and use of elixirs....   [tags: Religion]
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1049 words
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The Medium Theory - A common occurrence in the modern day is people losing faith in their religion. The main reason this happens falls to the fact that events that were once considered the act of a deity , such as specific flight patterns and songs of birds, are now attributed to the 'gods' Chance and Science. Without these things being seen as signs from a deity, people perceive no god to exist, and lose their faith. If one assumes that objects and concepts can be rated on how concerned the subject is with material and spiritual ideas, then you can illustrate them on a graph....   [tags: Religion] 740 words
(2.1 pages)
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Science and Religion: Our Attitudes Today Are Tomorrow's Future - ... Gravitational waves called dark energy are unseen matter from the epoch of the beginning inflation of the universe, and it is presently unknown how it interacts and influences normal matter. We return to the question of God. It is possible that the unbelievable makes the alternative more believable . Should modern science tap into the force field found all throughout the universe and continue to play “God” to accomplish a “truth” as seen with climatology, or surrender to accept boundaries and borders as was taught by modern science to the rest of the world ....   [tags: Scientific Research ]
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Organized Religion Versus Sprituality in William Blake's Poetry - William Blake was a poet and artist who was born in London, England in 1757. He lived 69 years, and although his work went largely unnoticed during his lifetime, he is now considered a prominent English Romantic poet. Blake’s religious views, and his philosophy that “man is god”, ran against the religious thoughts at the time, and some might equate Blake’s views to those of the hippie movement of the 20th century. In “The Garden of Love”, the conflict between organized religion and individual thought is the constant idea throughout the poem....   [tags: Poetry]
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Impact of Religion, Structure, and Education on the Decline of Constantinople - ... But this was Constantinople before the political and religious changes that could have caused the decline of Constantinople if it wasn’t for the influential continuities. Constantinople suffered and flourished as a result of several changes including the infamous Schism in 1054. The Schism in 1054 was the result of the arguments and a mutual excommunication between the patriarch of the East and the pope of the West. The patriarch and the pope disagreed over the use of icons, the Eastern Christian emperors saw the use of icons as a form of idol worship but the pope supported the use of icons....   [tags: World History] 956 words
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Hobbes, Marx, and Shah - The cold, calculating, and logical brains of Enlightenment thinkers are much different from the emotional, fantasy-loving mind of Romantics. The Enlightenment was an 18th century movement in which rationality and science were placed as the number one things a human could have (Brians). The Enlightenment also propagated the idea equality and liberalism (Brians). Romanticism was an international movement which occurred after the Enlightenment during the late 1700s to the mid-1800s (Melani). It placed emotions at the forefront of human thought (Melani)....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Flannery O’Connor's "Revelation" and the Power of Religion - Flannery O’Connor believed in the power of religion to give new purpose to life. She saw the fall of the old world, felt the force and presence of God, and her allegorical fictions often portray characters who discover themselves transforming to the Catholic mind. Though her literature does not preach, she uses subtle, thematic undertones and it is apparent that as her characters struggle through violence and pain, divine grace is thrown at them. In her story “Revelation,” the protagonist, Mrs. Turpin, acts sanctimoniously, but ironically the virtue that gives her eminence is what brings about her downfall....   [tags: Flannery O’Connor, Revelation, ] 1325 words
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Ludwig Wittgenstein - ... Thus, sentences are only meaningful if they correspond to facts in the world. This led Wittgenstein, a religious man himself, to believe that statements of ethics, religion, aesthetics and metaphysics are not meaningful as they are non-factual. For example, ‘The Mona Lisa is beautiful’, ‘Humans deserve equal rights’ and ‘God is our Father’ aren’t propositions at all as they don’t tell us anything, they are neither true or false. He acknowledges that the sentences of the Tractatus are not meaningful either as they speak about the relationship between language and the world rather than describing facts in the world....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Siddhartha the Life of a Prophet - ... He is said to have fasted for six years trying to understand the why suffering existed. It is recorded that he deprived his body so much that he could have easily died; He held his breath until his head roared, ate little food-and what he did eat was sickening-endured painful body positions for lengthy periods, became entrusted with filth, and lost weight until his bones protruded and he could feel his bones protruded and he could feel his spine by pressing on his abdomen. (Warren 107) It is said that he underwent such extreme measures that at one moment he almost died had Siddhartha not have come by and given him some food....   [tags: Religion, Buddhism] 1390 words
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Forms and Causes: Philosophies of Aristotle and Plato - ... He called his new theory he called Hylomorphism. Hylomorphism’s way of thinking stands directly opposite that which Plato’s forms encourage. Aristotle did not see the world as a reflection of another filled with forms but as the physical embodiment of the forms. The substances are created by the innate forms in the matter and are the only way we can perceive forms. This means that to Aristotle a substance did not have form only in an abstract world of forms but was contained by the object in and of itself....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Plato and The Renaissance - ... In many ways the Renaissance was a wonderful time for Plato to be reevaluated, but its popular vices limited understanding of what are perhaps Plato's most revolutionary ideals. Works Cited 1. Desmond Lee, trans. The Republic, 2nd ed. (New York: Penguin Books, 1987). 2. Ibid. 3. Chambers et al.. The Western Experience, Volume 1: To The Eighteenth Century. (New York: McGraw-Hill, 2007), 69. 4. Ibid. 5. Chambers et al.. The Western Experience, 147. 6. Anna Somfai. "The Eleventh-Century Shift in the Reception of Plato's "Timaeus" and Calcidius's "Commentary"." Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes, Vol....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Weaknesses of Descartes' Arguments - ... Descartes' attempt at reconciliation between religion and science was accepted by many but what about people who did not believe in things of a religious nature. This is where his philosophy fails. Descartes' bias becomes clear in his statement that the “truths of the faith...have always held first place among my beliefs” (Part Three; 28). There are many people who feel as though religion has nothing to do with who they are as a person or with how the world came about. To treat science as something that needs to take a back seat to religion is wrong, both are have the right to equal importance in philosophical understanding....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Lucretius' Writing on the Fear of Death - At the most basic level of subconscious thought, every living animal possesses a desire to stay alive. Usually, this instinct lays dormant, although in dire situations, we can be led to do unexpected things. In addition to this subconscious drive, there is a socially constructed motivation for fearing death. Thanks to the pervasive nature of religion throughout history, much of humanity has, at some point or another, feared the prospect of eternal damnation and torture during one’s life after death....   [tags: Philosophy] 1129 words
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Hume: Vices and Virtues - ... Since a man’s religious convictions were very important in determining his identity during that era, he continued to be asked if he was an atheist or not, until his death at age sixty-five. He answered by saying that he did not have enough faith to believe that there was no god. In reality, he probably was opposed to the demands of religious organizations and the restrictive laws that governed members. Hume wrote: “Tis not contrary to reason to prefer the destruction of the whole world to the scratching of my finger … ‘Tis as little contrary to reason to prefer my own acknowledged lesser good to my greater, and have a more ardent affection for the former than the latter.” I believe he was saying that practical rationality cannot require that we have certain desires if we cannot reach or obtain these desires from our present desires....   [tags: Philosophy] 1060 words
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Exploring the Significance of Trust - Trust is the confidence in our reasonable perception of existence, constantly refining and modifying the acquaintance between man and society. In addition, the significance of trust is it's inherent nature to lead mankind towards the evolutionary enlightenment of scientific realism, natural history, and social contracts, all possibly overseen by God's existence. With respect to our engagement with the dichotomies of religion and politics, and of church and state, a trustful continuance by mankind towards understanding assures that new perspectives and applications of social contracts and scientific theories are constantly applied....   [tags: philosophy] 594 words
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Candide Essay - The Enlightenment period of the 19th century was a major switch from a center around the Catholic Church to new secular ideas on politics and science, and the works of the writers who lived during this age reflect that. The French philosopher Voltaire, especially, expressed his opinions on society through satire, as in his novella, Candide. He invites his readers to look upon a world in which everything goes wrong and yet, the main character had an abundance of optimism—a contradiction that leads to Voltaire’s commentary in the work on utopias and how to find happiness....   [tags: Philosophy] 690 words
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Galileo's View of the New World - ... One of Galileo’s main issues was the purpose of scripture with regards to interpretation. Galileo makes the argument that Scripture cannot be wrong but it is up to the interpretation of it. For example, he stated, “Though the scripture cannot err, nevertheless some of its interpreters and expositors can sometimes err in various ways” . Furthermore he states that if we were to take the literal meaning of what the scripture states – we would be personifying God by giving him human characteristics of a body and emotions....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Candide or Optimism by Voltaire - ... To Voltaire, this type of optimism was foolish. Even though many people practiced this doctrine Voltaire did not aside with it instead, he implanted doubts on the chances of achieving true happiness and real conformism. Voltaire’s opinion was that one could not achieve true happiness in the real world but only experience it in an utopia. With the many hardships that Candide goes through ultimately leads him to abandon his attitude of optimism. Candide’s misfortunes and adversities often contrasted with his optimistic view on life....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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The Hub Theme - The beliefs and works of Voltaire, Diderot, Galileo, Kepler and Copernicus support the Hub theme which is: “Embracing learning; following our dreams and giving back so others can go forth.” These five philosophers from the Enlightenment period and Scientific Revolution embraced learning by deciding to go against what the Catholic Church believed was fact. They followed their dreams by not letting the church’s ignorance stop them from discovering great things. There are great works that were created by these philosophers during The Enlightenment period and Scientific Revolution....   [tags: Philosophy] 526 words
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Of Mircacles - David Hume wrote An Enquiry Concerning Human Understanding in 1748 and contained in this was an essay entitled “Of Miracles”. David Hume was a Scottish Philosopher that lived in the 18th century he was born on May 7th, 1711 and would die on August 25th, 1776. He was from a philosophical school known as Empiricism, which basically means that everything originates through sense experience. He believed that everything we know ultimately started in the senses. So, in essence we learn and know everything we do via our five senses: sight, hearing, taste, and touch....   [tags: Philosophy] 790 words
(2.3 pages)
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Plato on Knowledge - Plato on Knowledge Plato argues that philosophy purifies ones soul and prepares one for death. Through his work The Republic he speaks about how everyone and everything is similar in regards to thought process. Plato argues that wisdom is gained over time. As a person grows they are exposed to numerous situations and events, which provide one with experience and teachings. Everything that happens in one’s life shapes who they will become, how their wisdom grows, and how much wisdom they obtain....   [tags: Philosophy ] 1760 words
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Victorianism and Existentialism - ... In general, “[e]xistentialism in the broader sense is a 20th century philosophy that is centered upon the analysis of existence and of the way humans find themselves existing in the world” (AllAboutPhilosophy). Also, “[c]ertain themes are common to almost all existential writing” (Mcintyre). For example, all their writings share some common main themes of existentialism which includes “individual existence, individual freedom and individual choice” (Hayes). Additionally, some other shared themes include subjectivity, anxiety, anguish, absurdity, nothingness, death and existence precedes essence (Mcintyre)....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Transformation: Augustine's Journey to Christianity - ... With respect to that, not only does it introduce him to God’s benevolence, it instructs him on how to change his daily prayer routines, and even, his fervor towards loving God. In addition, Hortensius also altered Augustine’s perception of philosophy, as it instructs him to use his passion for knowledge as a means of advancing his effort towards understanding God. Although Augustine’s finds a renewed sense of intellectual purpose through the ideas conveyed in Hortensius, it only fuels his need to broaden his knowledge, so much to the point where his first contact with dogmatism is realized....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Empiricism and Rationalism - ... Does allergy discomfort exist without a allergy test to perceive the level of discomfort. Years later my empirical data was proven valid and my son has been taking allergy medication for over ten years. I accessed my son’s changes in behavior empirically, yet the process that joined that behavior to certain foods was rationalism through reason. Rationalism can have multiple meanings; it can be used to describe “a person who elevates human reasoning above the Scriptures and teachings of the historic Christian faith....   [tags: philosophy]
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Socrates: One of the Greatest Minds the World Has Ever Known - ... In other words, if the person is corrupt or possesses some sort of graft then the government will also. Socrates, if one reads any of Plato’s works, seems to be a man of intense and never satisfied curiosity. He employed the same logical actions developed by the Sophists to a new purpose, the pursuit of truth. Many credit Socrates with the birth of critical philosophy in that he would accept nothing less than a full account of how something worked, what someone’s motivations were for committing certain acts, and where one might go to find the answers....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Friedrich Nietzsche - ... For example, Human, All Too Human had 1,000 original copies printed in 1878 and in 1886, more than half remained unsold. Aside from The Birth of Tragedy, which was his most criticized book, almost all of his books sold only a few hundred copies. It wasn’t until after Nietzche’s death when he gained minor publicity and his books began to sell. Even then, most of the attention brought towards Nietzsche was primarily negative. The two groups most closely associated with Nietzsche are the fascists and anarchists, neither one of which he supported, endorsed or even referenced directly in his books....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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Prosperity and Peril at the Peak with Pericles - ... With this newfound “material as well as moral independence,” (Robinson 38) the self-represented people of Athens began to have an identity. With this greater equality and freedom came new ideas, and ideals, among intellectuals in Athens. Whereas Greek philosophers were once concerned with nature, “now, in the new day of democracy, with its theory of human equality, they turned to the study of man” (Robinson 67). Because of democracy’s insistence on human’s roles in their society, and indeed its newness, philosophers now not only examined natural philosophy and science, but further considered human potential....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek] 1732 words
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Religion and Education - ... This left me questioning if our historical struggles have been reduced to a mere irrelevant glitch in time. Or will it be in reverse, where the neoliberal agenda becomes a mere glitch in our history. In examining one aspect of AAM history I turn to the Nation of Islam. The Nation of Islam started businesses, employed their own, started schools and educated their own based on the principle of “know self, love self and do for self”. The self they were referring to was a collective self, a communal self....   [tags: Child Development ]
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Use of Ethos, Pathos, and Logos in Rhetoric - ... His advancements in the fields of physics, metaphysics, poetry, theater, music, logic, linguistics, politics, government, ethics, biology, and zoology were ground breaking at the time, but it was all thanks to his skills in Rhetoric. His numerous speeches and works moved people with his persuasive words and one could even say he was a master of influence. What made him different from the teachers of his time was that Aristotle advocated in his works that Rhetoric “is useful; and further, that its function is not so much to persuade, as to find out in each case the existing means of persuasion”....   [tags: Philosophy Essays] 1156 words
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Confucianism And Buddhism - Are Confucianism and Buddhism religions. To answer this question one must first find the definition of the word religion. According to our text book the word religion come from the Latin word religio which means awe for the gods and concern for proper ritual (experiencing the worlds religion 3). The definition of the word religion according to several dictionaries is a belief in a divine or superhuman power or powers to be obeyed and worshiped as the creator and the ruler of the universe, or any specific systems of belief, worship or conduct often involving a code of ethics and philosophy....   [tags: Comparative Religion] 973 words
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Santeria - Santería The Yoruba people, who were brought over from Nigeria as slaves, came to the Caribbean in the 1500’s with their own religion, which was seen as unfit by the white slave owners. Most plantation owners in the Caribbean were members of the Roman Catholic Church, so they forced their slaves to disregard their native religions and become Catholic. Soon, the slaves realized that they could still practice their West African religion as long as it was disguised as Catholicism, and Santería was born....   [tags: Religion] 1211 words
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The Role of Faith and the Nechung Oracle in Tibetan Culture - The Role of Faith and the Nechung Oracle in Tibetan Culture In the United States, we pride ourselves on our objectiveness, our ability not to get caught up in religious fervor. We often think that people who believe deeply in their religion and involve it in all aspects of their lives are "fanatics"—that they are somehow beneath us, less deserving of our respect. We are taught almost from birth that the scientific method is the only way to look at the world. We learn the steps of the scientific method (observation, hypothesis, test, and theory) in elementary school....   [tags: Religion]
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Nietzsche On Buddhism - Nietzsche repeatedly refers to Buddhism as a decadent and nihilistic religion. It seems to be a textbook case of just what Nietzsche is out to remedy in human thinking. It devalues the world as illusory and merely apparent, instead looking to an underlying reality for value and meaning. Its stated goals seem to be negative and escapist, Nietzsche sometimes seems to praise certain aspects of Buddhist teaching—and some of his own core ideas bear a resemblance to Buddhist doctrine. What exactly is Nietzsche’s evaluation of Buddhism....   [tags: Religion] 1686 words
(4.8 pages)
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Confucianism - Confucianism The religion of Confucianism is and interesting and unique religion. The various parts of this belief system deal more with humanity than with deities or supernatural occurrences. It is this fact that leads many to believe that Confucianism is more a philosophy or way of life than a religion. There are, however, various ceremonies and beliefs that those who follow Confucianism observe. In short, Confucianism has had more impact on the lives of the Chinese than any other single religion....   [tags: Religion Confucianism] 1263 words
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Complementary: The Sacred and the Secular - ... Religiously, the shamans aided Kings in giving the proper sacrifices to ancestors. Shamans revered “deities [of] nature”, serving as an indirect premise to early Daoist concepts—“this worldly”. Politically, while also indirectly serving as the foundation of Confucian ideals, this separation of power established a social chain of command. Similarly, the introduction of filial piety allowed further religious and political merging. Ancestral worship varied, with heavy emphasis on royal lineage, and placed “political importance of the spirit world” in ordinance with “the state”....   [tags: Religion, Chinese Ideals] 1282 words
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Voltaire’s Candide: Prejudices Against Religion and State - Prejudices Against Religion and State in Candide   Voltaire has strong viewpoints that become very obvious when reading his work Candide.  Candide is a collection of criticisms that immortalize Voltaire's Controversial thoughts and prejudices against religion and state.        Voltaire had a negative view on government as he wrote in Candide: "let us work without arguing, that is the only way to make life endurable." Voltaire accepted the Royalists and rejected the parliamentary interpretation of the French constitution, but he was willing to concede that the legal position was not clear....   [tags: Candide essays]
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Relationship Between Religion and Art in Medieval, Renaissance and Contemporary Times - ... 29). Noticeably, hardly any artists or architects are credited in medieval art. Artists did not yet have names (Sewall 459). Man originally thought himself to be inferior and only able to succeed if it was God’s will, but the Renaissance allowed him to feel more powerful and independent (Gardner 397). While medieval art tended to be objective and to the point, the art of the Renaissance was more complex and rich with new ideas (Murray The High Renaissance and Mannerism: Italy, The North, and Spain 1500-1600 32)....   [tags: Art History]
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Voltaire’s Views of Religion and State Expressed In Candide - Voltaire’s Views of Religion and State Expressed In Candide      Throughout Candide, Voltaire uses satire as a tool to reveal his controversial views regarding religion and State. He reveals the corruption, hypocrisy and immorality present in the way in which government and religion operated during his lifetime. Most particularly, he criticizes violent government behaviour (ie; war) and the behaviour of members of the aristocracy, who constituted the bulk of high ranking government and religious leaders....   [tags: Candide essays]
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Science vs. Religion: How were we created? - LSTD 3433 Final Paper Science vs. Religion: How were we created. The idea of creation is one of the most controversial issues we have today. Your age, background, religion, and beliefs are the main characters that effect what you believe created the world. Science believes several theories on the creation but the most accepted is the Big Bang Theory. Religion has their own views on creation, Christians believe that God created the world, Islamic believe that Allah created man but in steps, and Mayans believe that the Heart of Sky created man....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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The Path of a Buddhist - The Path of a Buddhist Buddhism is a religion and philosophy based on the teachings of the Buddha, Siddhartha Gautama. Today, Buddhism has an estimated seven hundred million followers, known as Buddhists. Most practicing Buddhists believe in ideas such as karma, dharma, samsara and nirvana. In addition to these, Buddhists base their lives and actions on the Four Noble Truths and the Noble Eightfold Path. Taught by Gautama, the Noble Eightfold path is a theory, that when put into action, serves as a way to end suffering (The Noble Eightfold Path)....   [tags: Religion Buddhism] 1292 words
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Taizong versus Al Mawardi in Politics and Religion - The Taizong handout and the Al Mawardi source can be compared through their religious and political similarities and differences. These two sources have many similarities, yet they also have some key differences. They differ, for example, in their views of: ways a ruler or emperor should rule their government or empire, the use of the military, and the similarity between who will succeed and or shall be chosen for a right task in government. It seems as if the Islamic structure for government is much more strict than the Tang Dynasty, based on the fact that the Islamic government must follow the Koran and Hadith....   [tags: essays research papers] 872 words
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Confucianism And Christianity - History's halls rang with the sound of a single hammer as one man remodeled Christianity for all time. This man was Martin Luther, and he changed history's course when he nailed his 95 Theses to the door of the cathedral in Wittenberg, Germany on October 31, 1517. These theses challenged the Roman Catholic Church by inviting debate over the legitimacy of many of the Church's practices, especially the sale of indulgences.1 Luther's simple action not only got him into trouble with church authorities but also precipitated the reform of Roman Catholicism in Europe....   [tags: Religion Religious] 1841 words
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Social Contract Theory and the Nature of Society, Rules and Morality - Social Contract Theory and the Nature of Society, Rules and Morality Social contract theory is a philosophy about the nature of morality and the origins of society. Its adherents believe “social organization rests on a contract or compact which the people have made among themselves” (Reese, 533). This concept was first articulated by the Sophists, who said societies are not natural occurrences but rather the result of a consensus of people (Reese 533). Plato expresses these ideas in The Republic when he says that society is created to meet human needs (Encyclopedia 1)....   [tags: Philosophy Essays]
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Roman and Greek Philosophy's Influence on Today's Western Culture - Advances in Art, science and politics were made in the eastern part of the Mediterranean Sea. Greek philosophers were among the first in the West to explore nature in a rational way and to make educated guesses about the creation of the world and the universe. This is why Greece is often referred to as the birthplace of Western culture. The ancient Greeks viewed the world in a way that one would today perhaps describe as "holistic". Science, philosophy, art and politics were interwoven and combined into one worldview....   [tags: essays research papers] 766 words
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Determining and Differentiating Approaches to Reason - Hume uses three speakers to present various approaches to reasoning. Cleanthes, Philo, and Demea are the three speakers in Hume's Dialogues Concerning Natural Religion that are offered up to readers as distinct and contrasting approaches to the art of reasoning and knowledge. There is Cleanthes that has his "careful philosophical methods" contrasted by "the causal skepticism of Philo" and "with the rigid inflexible orthodoxy of Demea." Demea begins by explaining his personal approach to knowledge through the example of how he raised and educated his own children....   [tags: Philosophy] 342 words
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My Philosophy of Education: Combining Progressivism, Essentialism and Behaviorism - My Philosophy of Education: Combining Progressivism, Essentialism and Behaviorism Upon being faced with the task of writing my philosophy of teaching, I made many attempts to narrow the basis for my philosophy down to one or two simple ideas. However, I quickly came to the realization that my personal teaching philosophy stems from many other ideas, philosophies, and personal experiences. I then concentrated my efforts on finding the strongest points of my personal beliefs about teaching and what I have learned this semester, and came up with the following....   [tags: Teaching Education School Teacher Essays] 828 words
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Human Rights in the "age of Discovery" - In Rene Trujillo's book "Human Rights in the 'Age of Discovery,'" the introduction explains the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. The Declaration was adopted in 1948 by the United Nations and was ratified by 48 nations. Eleanor Roosevelt was the chair of the commission that wrote it and represented the United States in the United Nations. Most national constitutions incorporate some of the Declaration's principles and human rights organizations think of the Declaration as a kind of constitution, stating rights and freedoms....   [tags: Philosophy] 601 words
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The Buddhas Four Noble Truths: A Logical Basis For Philosophy - The Buddha's Four Noble Truths: A Logical Basis for Philosophy The Buddha Shakyamuni was born in the 6th century BCE in the area presently known as Nepal. During his 80 year lifetime, he systematically developed a pragmatic, empirically based philosophy which he claimed would lead its followers towards an enlightened existence. Buddhism is commonly called a religion; however, it differs from the usual definition of a religion in that it has no deities, does not promote worship of demigods, and is based on logical reasoning and observation rather than spiritual faith....   [tags: essays research papers] 1645 words
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Mind, Matter and Descartes - Mind, Matter and Descartes "Cogito Ergo Sum," "I think, therefore I am," the epitome of Rene Descartes' logic. Born in 1596 in La Haye, France, Descartes studied at a Jesuit College, where his acquaintance with the rector and childhood frailty allowed him to lead a leisurely lifestyle. This opulence and lack of daily responsibility gave him the liberty to offer his discontentment with both contrived scholasticism, philosophy of the church during the Middle Ages, as well as extreme skepticism, the doctrine that absolute knowledge is impossible....   [tags: Philosophy essays] 673 words
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Zen Buddhist Philosophy in Japanese Death Poems - Zen Philosophy in Japanese Death Poems: Dealing With Death Each and every culture follows a certain set of distinct practices that are distinct and specific to each individual culture. The common Western perception of Japan's ambiguous practices stems from the extreme difference in views correlated with the widespread lack of knowledge concerning the ancient culture steeped in tradition. Japan's widely Buddhist population is known for their calm acceptance of death as a part of life. One particular, perplexing cultural practice is the tradition of writing jisei, or "death poetry" when on the verge of death....   [tags: World Literature] 810 words
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Personal Narrative: My Personal Christian Philosophy - Humans from my own point of view are God's creation, because the bible makes me understand that humans were created in God's image, and during the creation of man, God blew the breath of life into man to make him come alive. I assume the reason humans are so unique is that they were created like God. The reason why humans are the best of all creation is that they can think, invent new things, and have dominion of all other creatures on earth. Humans are the only living creation that is conscious of their own existence, because they have advanced knowledge and skills to do things, for example, humans can clothe themselves, cook their foods, and even invent numerous technologies....   [tags: essays research papers] 893 words
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Comparing Phaedo and Ecclesiastes - Comparing Phaedo and Ecclesiastes   Separated by language, history and several hundred miles of the Mediterranean Sea, two of the world's greatest cultures simultaneously matured and advanced in the centuries before the birth of Christianity. In the Aegean north, Hellenic Greeks blossomed around their crown jewel of Athens, while the eastern Holy City of Jerusalem witnessed the continued development of Hebrew tradition. Though they shared adjacent portions of the globe and of chronology, these two civilizations grew up around wholly different ideologies....   [tags: Philosophy Essays]
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David Hume's Anti Miracle Belief - The problem of miracles is an ancient one that has persisted for most of human history, but that has been addressed with some depth only in the last few centuries. The great empiricist philosopher David Hume was one of the first to present an analysis of miracles that tried to explain why they are created (by human beings themselves, in Hume’s opinion) and why people are so ready to believe in them. This is an important field of study, as with greater knowledge of the character of physical law, one finds more and more (rather than less) accounts of miracles being touted as exceptions to natural laws....   [tags: Philosophy Hume] 1579 words
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Human Values and Ethics - What Science Cannot Discover, Mankind Cannot Know - Human Valuse and Ethics - What Science Cannot Discover, Mankind Cannot Know Those who maintain the insufficiency of science, as we have seen in the last two chapters, appeal to the fact that science has nothing to say about "values." This I admit; but when it is inferred that ethics contains truths which cannot be proved or disproved by science, I disagree. The matter is one on which it is not altogether easy to think clearly, and my own views on it are quite different from what they were thirty years ago....   [tags: Philosophy Essays] 4382 words
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The American Encounter With Buddhism - Before reading "The American Encounter with Buddhism, 1844-1912: Victorian Culture and the Limits of Dissent" by Thomas A. Tweed I had no experience with Buddhism except for what I have seen in the movies and in the media. Seeing Buddhism through these different sources, it does not portray an accurate illustration of what the religion is truly regarding. Having little to no knowledge about the background of the religion makes reading this book both interesting and a little difficult to read at the same time....   [tags: Tweed Buddhism Religion] 1390 words
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Universal Churches and the Role of Religion in Arnold J. Toynbee’s A Study of History - Universal Churches and the Role of Religion in Arnold J. Toynbee’s A Study of History Introduction Religion has always been one of the universal attributes of human society. All civilizations look for an explanation of how the world works and try to decipher their own place in that world. No world historian should attempt to study either individual societies or a global society without seriously studying the place that the search for the divine has played in the human story. Arnold J. Toynbee paid particular attention to the role of religion in the later volumes of his twelve volume work, A Study of History....   [tags: Church Religious Arnold J. Toynbee Essays] 6825 words
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The Religions of Africa - For many centuries the religions of Africa have been called a variety of names. The problem that has arisen with these names is that almost every one of them can and has been deemed as negative, illegitimately ambiguous, or inaccurate. Examples of such names are respectively, Paganism or Heathenism, Fetishism or Animism, and Tribal Religion or African Primal Religion. These examples along with the other negative, illegitimately ambiguous, and inaccurate names coined as attempts to provide a consolidated name for the religions of Africa, all fall under the classification of misnomers of African Religion....   [tags: World Cultures] 1268 words
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Religion and Coming of Age in Olive Ann Burns’ Novel, Cold Sassy Tree - Religion and Coming of Age in Olive Ann Burns’ Novel, Cold Sassy Tree In the small southern town of Cold Sassy, Georgia, at the turn of the twentieth century, teenage boys had to grow up fast. They were not in any way sheltered from the daily activities of the town. This was especially true for fourteen year old Will Tweedy. Olive Ann Burns’ first, and only completed novel, Cold Sassy Tree, tells of young Will’s coming-of-age. His experiences with religion, progress, and death in Cold Sassy escorted him along the path to manhood....   [tags: Olive Ann Burns’ Cold Sassy Tree] 518 words
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The Rise Of Christianity - The rise of Christianity in philosophy One influential cult was based upon a mystical interpretation of Plato. Neo-Platonism was like a rational science that attempted to break down and describe every aspect of the divine essence and its relationship with the human soul. An Alexandrian Jew named Philo tried using Greek philosophy to interpret the Jewish scriptures. He wanted to unite the two traditions by suggesting that the Greek philosophers had been inspired by the same God who had revealed himself to the Jews....   [tags: Religion Christian Christianity] 1315 words
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Comparing Science and Religion in Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Metropolis - The Struggle Between Science and Religion in Frankenstein, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, and Metropolis From Frankenstein to Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde to Metropolis, the mad scientist is one of the modern world's most instantly recognizable and entertaining cultural icons. Popular culture's fascination with demented doctors, crazed clinicians, and technologically fanatical fiends have dominated the major motifs of popular literature and film for most of the 20th century and this fascination will continue into the 21st century....   [tags: Comparison Comapre Contrast Essays]
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The Influence of Christianity on Ancient and Modern Greece - The Influence of Christianity on Ancient and Modern Greece Problems with format ?From the earliest establishment of Christian churches in Macedonia, Achaia, Epirus, and Crete, to the expansion of the Orthodox Church, Greece has been a formidable landmark for development of Christianity throughout the world.. From its arrival to Greece with the first preaching of Paul, the Christian faith has undergone a unique assimilation into the cultural and philosophical traditions of the Greek people to create a church, visibly distinguishable from all other sects and denominations of Christianity.....   [tags: Greek Creece Religion Essays]
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Scientology - Scientology In today's society it is evident that the worlds of science and religion are in a constant battle to explain many of life’s mysteries. Whereas science fields have their theorems and hypotheses, religions have doctrines and dogmas that frequently conflict with a scientist’s view. The age old question of whether science and religion will ever merge positively has been answered by the new religion Scientology. Scientology is described as an applied religious philosophy that began in the 1950's....   [tags: Religion Science Research papers]
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From Apocalyptic to Messianic: Philosophia Universalis - From Apocalyptic to Messianic: Philosophia Universalis ABSTRACT: Perhaps for the first time in history, the turn of a millennium is directly reflected in philosophy-as an apocalyptic end of philosophy. Recently, an attempt to channel apocalyptic into messianic has been undertaken by Derrida in his Spectres of Marx. However, Derrida's endeavor does not relate directly to philosophy and thus does not alter its apocalyptic landscape. Considering the critical state of contemporary philosophy, it is unclear whether such an alteration can be performed in the West....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophic Essays]
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The Art of Courtly Love, Consolation of Philosophy, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight - The Art of Courtly Love, Consolation of Philosophy, and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight Part 1: Consolation of Philosophy, written by Boethius 1. Boethius was a popular member of the senatorial family. He was a philosopher that agreed with Plato that government should be solely in the hands of wise men. After becoming consul, charges of treason were brought against him. He lived in a time in Roman society when everyone was mainly Christian. He was an Arian Christian and believed that Christ was neither truly God nor truly man....   [tags: Papers] 1449 words
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Hypocrisy and Christianity - Hypocrisy and Christianity If one were to ask the American public about their views of Christians, what response would one receive. We can imagine that there would be a great variety of answers. However, most people might say that, in general, Christians are not very different from everybody else. This is a problem. There are many people who claim to be Christians whose lifestyles do not reflect their beliefs. The problem with this situation is that it gives non-Christians the wrong impression of Christianity....   [tags: Hypocrites Christian Religion Essays] 1160 words
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Biography of J. Gresham Machen - Biography of J. Gresham Machen John Gresham Machen was born in Baltimore, Maryland on July 28th 1881 to parents Arthur Webster and Mary Hones Gresham. From an early age Machen was taught lessons of the bible and of Jesus. His family attended a Presbyterian church called Franklyn Street Presbyterian. (Wikipedia) Machen's father was a lawyer and therefore Machen was considered to be brought up in a rather privileged home. He attendee a private college where he was educated in classics such a Greek and Latin....   [tags: Biography Theology Religion Machen] 1823 words
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