Search Results rabies

Free Essays Unrated Essays Better Essays Stronger Essays Powerful Essays Term Papers Research Papers

Your search returned 128 essays for "rabies":
[1] [2] [Next >>]

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.
Title Length Color Rating  
Rabies - Rabies Rabies virus belongs to the Lyssavirus family in which all the members are animal viruses mainly found in bats and are of a bullet-like shape. The virus is usually spread through bites or scratches. Rabies was first suspected in bats in Brazil during the 1910s. In 1931, it was diagnosed for the first time in Trinidad. Rabies is most common in Asia and found more in wild animals than in domestic animals or humans. There has only been one person who miraculously survived rabies even though she had never been previously exposed to it....   [tags: Biology Medical Disease Rabies]
:: 1 Sources Cited
1137 words
(3.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Rabies - Abstract Rabies is a highly infectious viral disease that can easily ruin and eventually end the lives of both humans and animals alike. Rabies comes in two forms for animals. It comes in the form of paralytic rabies, which is the kind that puts you in paralysis right from the beginning, skipping the symptoms of agitation and excitability. Rabies also appears in the form of furious rabies, which is completely different in the way that it makes the victim restless, vicious and agitated. When humans get rabies, their symptoms start out with simple headaches and fevers and later progresses to terrible things such as becoming hydrophobic because of painful throat spasms and paralysis....   [tags: Biology Medical Disease Rabies]
:: 1 Works Cited
997 words
(2.8 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Rabies - Rabies What is Rabies. Who gets Rabies. Rabies is a viral disease of humans and other mammals. It is most common in carnivores. The word rabies comes from the word "hydrophobia", fear of water. Rabies is a potentially deadly disease. There are many things you can do to prevent yourself from meeting rabies. The most important thing to do, is to be certain your pets have updated vaccinations. Your pets can first get their vaccinations when they are three months old. After that booster vaccinations must be given every one to three years according to your state and city laws....   [tags: essays research papers] 702 words
(2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Rabies - Rabies Rabies is an infectious disease of animals which is a member of a group of viruses constituting the family Rhabdoviridae. The virus particle is covered in a fatty membrane, is bullet-shaped, 70 by 180 nanometres and contains a single helical strand of ribonucleic acid (RNA). Although rabies is usually spread among domestic dogs and wild carnivorous animals, all warm-blooded animals are susceptible to infection. The virus is often present in the salivary glands of infected animals, referred to as rabid, and is excreted in the saliva....   [tags: essays research papers] 623 words
(1.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Rabies - Rabies The final and certainly most famous success of Pasteur's research was the development of a vaccine against rabies or hydrophobia as it is also known. The disease has always had a hold on the public imagination and has been looked upon with horror. It evokes visions of "raging victims, bound and howling, or asphyxiated between two mattresses" (Duclaux). The treatments applied to victims were as horrible as the supposed symptoms: this included cauterizing the bite wounds with a red-hot poker....   [tags: Papers] 653 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Rabies - Rabies, it kills 30-70 thousand people each year around the world (CDC). 40,000 people are treated for it each year in the United States alone (CDC). Carried by rabid animals, this viral infection poses a threat to animal lovers alike. The primary problem of rabies is prevention, the effects are severe, and the causes are many. The virus is spread by animals. Warm blooded animals are required to transmit the virus and the disease is almost always fatal (CDC). It is passed through saliva from the host to the victim also through mucous membranes like the eyes or nose....   [tags: essays research papers] 739 words
(2.1 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Rabies Prevention - Rabies Prevention This writing is mainly about the vaccines or the products that can be used to prevent Rabies. Its states the names of a couple of vaccines such as preexposure phophylaxis and Rabies immune globulin. And it explain how each of them work or what they do. It names some kinds of people who are at daily exposure or at risk of obtaining Rabies. It also says who long the Rabies immune globulin has effect. Rabies is a very dangerous thing once you get it, because once you get the symptoms for Rabies there is nothing anyone can do about it....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical Disease] 616 words
(1.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Rabies Symptoms - Rabies Symptoms Rabies is an extremely old disease. Some speculate that it is as old as humankind itself. Rabies belongs to a family of viruses called lyssa. Lyssa is the Greek word for rabies, which is derived from the root “lud”, which means violent. The first case of rabies was described in the 23rd century BC in the Eshuma Code of Babylon. Generally, the virus is transmitted to humans by other animals or humans who are already infected. Rabies is an extremely deadly disease, and if left untreated, it has a mortality rate greater than 99 percent....   [tags: Medical Disease]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 2 Sources Cited
1249 words
(3.6 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Rabies Control - Rabies Control Rabies is widespread due to the lack of control, especially in third-world countries that obtain the virus usually through being bitten by the animals in the wild. Nevertheless, rabies cases overall has decreased compared to previous years due to increased restrictions that includes vaccinations and laws. This has made countries such as the United States and Great Britain average about only a couple of cases of rabies a year. Unfortunately, rabies will most likely remain as it is impossible to vaccinate every mammal and there are animals that can live successfully with the disease....   [tags: Disease Vaccine]
:: 4 Works Cited :: 1 Sources Cited
1607 words
(4.6 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
The Infection of Rabies - Rabies: The Infection Rabies is an infectious disease that is hard to survive through. Although rabies is mostly found in animals, humans can also carry the virus and spread it amongst others. This virus is well known as the slow virus because it will slowly kill you. There are many symptoms of rabies, in both animals and humans, that reveal themselves only after they have been bitten. This part of the essay will give you the who, what, when, where, why, and how of the rabies infection. The infectious disease known as rabies is a virus that spreads from the wound to the central nervous system, causing the body to malfunction until finally crashing down....   [tags: Disease Virus]
:: 2 Sources Cited :: 2 Sources Consulted
1358 words
(3.9 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
History of Rabies - History of Rabies Abstract: Rabies, literally meaning “furious” in Latin, is commonly known throughout the ages for its terrifying effects on both humans and animals alike. Because the disease is fatal, people throughout the world have put greatest effort to find ways of controlling and preventing the disease. Natural remedies and protection amulets were used until Pasteur’s discovery of the vaccine. Based on those findings, people have altered techniques to make the vaccine. However, recently, there have been two particular cases concerning rabies....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical Disease]
:: 3 Works Cited :: 1 Sources Cited
2017 words
(5.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Rabies the Fatal Disease - Rabies: A Fatal Disease in Wild Life and Man Kind Abstract: Rabies is a dangerous disease that affects both animals and humans. Rabies is caused by the lyssa virus and is almost 100% fatal. The majority of the people infected die from it but there have been a small number of miraculous cases where people have survived. One very special case took place in the life of Jeanna Giese because she recovered without the use of rabies vaccines. There are four FDA approved vaccines for public usage but they are not guaranteed to cure....   [tags: Lyssa virus Diseases]
:: 7 Sources Cited
1737 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Rabies Treatment and Prevention - Rabies: Treatment and Prevention Abstract Rabies is an aggressive and extremely detrimental disease. For years, exposure to rabies was analogous to a death sentence as there was absolutely no hope for a cure or a chance of survival after contracting it. Now, thanks to the development of many new vaccines, rabies has become a curable disease that can easily be prevented from destroying the lives of both humans and animals. However vaccinations are only a single facet in a wide spectrum of precautionary measures that can be taken to help halt the spread of this devastating disease....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 3 Sources Cited
1567 words
(4.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
History and Vectors of Rabies - History and Vectors of Rabies Literally meaning “madness and fury”, rabies is commonly recognized by the characteristic foaming of the mouth and wild behavior. However, this is only the tip of the iceberg. This disease is spread through the saliva of infected carriers. Rabies is a viral disease that targets the nervous system which is always fatal with the exception of a single case. Natural remedies and spiritual therapies were used in hopes of warding away this fatal disease until the discovery of vaccination revolutionized medicine....   [tags: Medical Disease]
:: 3 Works Cited :: 2 Sources Cited
1301 words
(3.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Rabies Virus and Treatment - Rabies Virus and Treatment Rabies is a virus that is characterized under the family name Rhabdoviridae and genus name Lyssavirus which travels to either the brain or the spinal cord, where it attacks a victim's nervous system until death occurs as discovered by Pasteur. It is rabies unique bullet-shaped body and tubular extensions, along with its specialized proteins that contribute to its deadliness. Aside from one case of rabies that occurred in 2004 in Wisconsin, rabies has proven fatal; there is no real treatment besides prevention....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical]
:: 4 Sources Cited
1359 words
(3.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Rabies : The Virus and Its Mechanisms - Rabies : The Virus and Its Mechanisms Rabies is an infectious disease that has been around the world since the time of Columbus and his first trip to the New World. Back then, it was characterized as the “mad dog” disease and only few would survive it. Those who survived, it was said, were due to miracles. Rabies is a disease that attacks and infiltrates the nervous system and ultimately attacks the brain of its host, leading to neuronal dysfunctions. Throughout the years, scientists have studied the virus with deep interest, as some of its qualities are known, and others are not....   [tags: Medicine Disease]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 3 Sources Cited
2032 words
(5.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Rabies: Closer Than You Think - Rabies: Closer Than You Think Rabies, a virus of the nervous system and salivary glands is a fast moving killer; it’s not something to mess around with. Rabies comes from the Latin word “to rage”. Rabies is easily associated with rage. When people think of rabies, they usually think of a mad raccoon or dog, foaming at the mouth and running around crazy; dying soon after. The thought of going crazy is a pretty reasonable guess for how rabies torments its victims. The virus enters through a bite or transfer of infected saliva and makes its way through the nerves toward your spinal cord and brain....   [tags: science] 1555 words
(4.4 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Small Animal Diseases - Louise Pasteur, a Frenchman who was neither a physician nor a veterinarian moved into the spotlight to help find a vaccine for Rabies. He began the study of Rabies when two rabid dogs were brought into his laboratory. One of the dogs suffered from the dumb form of the disease: his lower jaw hung down, he foamed at the mouth, and his eyes had a rather vacant look. The other dog was furious: he snapped, bit any object held out to him, and let out frightening howls (McCoy 65). Through the studies already observed, rabies was transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal, and that the incubation period varied from a few days to several months....   [tags: essays research papers] 3437 words
(9.8 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Animal Control - The Maricopa County animal control has evolved over the last century and the best way to understand animal control is to look at it through history. During the first quarter of the 20th Century, Maricopa County communities were rural and sparsely populated. Dogs and cats were valued for what they contributed to this rural lifestyle. Dogs were working dogs earning their keep on a local ranch or farm, or they were used for hunting to help put food on the table. Some dogs, as well as cats, were used as mousers to help keep small rodents out of the homes and barns....   [tags: essays research papers] 702 words
(2 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Human Fears of Biological Science - ... Theses infectious viruses would then fester inside the human and genetically alter the human genome causing a differentiation in human cells. Therefore, the brain cells of the human would be altered into a state of unconsciousness or abnormality. The second spread of infection, much like the virus, is the parasite. According to one research study done, fungal parasites are unlikely to ‘emerge’ as new infectious diseases of wildlife, whilst bacteria, protozoans, and viruses are. However, this assumption may be premature due to a bias in the information available....   [tags: Health]
:: 5 Works Cited
2000 words
(5.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
To Kill A Mockingbird - Symbols - A symbol is a word or expression which signifies something other than the physical object to which it directly refers. The book “To Kill A Mockingbird” by Harper Lee contains three recognizable symbols. “Mockingbirds don’t do one thing but make music for us to enjoy. They don’t eat up people’s gardens, don’t nest in corncribs, they don’t do one thing but sing their hearts out for us. That’s why it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.” (103) This could possibly be a symbol for Tom Robinson. He was innocent, yet sentenced to death because of his ethnicity....   [tags: literary analysis, analytical essay] 509 words
(1.5 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
The Father of Microbes: Biography of Louis Pasteur - ... The producer’s problem with the vinegar was that the vinegar would be spoiled and wanted to find a solution to keep it from spoiling. Pasteur then observed the beet juice with a microscope and found that it had yeast and alcohol. The action of beet juice and yeast was fermentation. To solve this he heated up the beet juice and destroyed the yeast. With this, he called this process “pasteurization” (BBC History, 2011). On he continued, and started to do research on Silkworms. By the year of 1865, Pasteur helped the silk industry in France....   [tags: Biography ]
:: 5 Works Cited
885 words
(2.5 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
The Crucial Role of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird - The Crucial Role of Symbols in To Kill a Mockingbird       In To Kill a Mockingbird, written by Harper Lee, themes and central ideas of the novel are emphasized by subtle symbols. Symbols shown throughout the novel not only represent concrete objects but also ideas, feelings, beliefs, and attitudes of the characters. Some symbols even represent more than one thing. Lee's recurring use of symbols contribute to the underlying themes and ideas of the novel. Lee's unusual title is a symbol itself and it keeps the reader in anticipation while waiting for a mockingbird to enter the story....   [tags: Kill Mockingbird essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
2059 words
(5.9 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
History of Disease - ... Many scientists like Louis Pasteur confirmed that living must come from living. Thinking living emerging from nonliving is really confusing. However, during mid-20th century, people tested by trying to make organic material with inorganic materials. They eventually succeeded when they tested using identical atmosphere of ancient Earth and proved that prebiotic evolution, or process from inorganic to organic to life occurred in Earth (Zimmerman, 2003). As life emerged on Earth, the first organism was bacteria....   [tags: Medical Science] 1067 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Louis Pasteur: A National Hero - ... He succeeded and went on to study at the Ecole Normale Superieure. In 1847 he was given his doctorate and became a teacher’s assistant. In 1849 he was made professor of physics in the University of Strasbourg. That same year he married Marie Laurent, who happened to be the daughter of the rector of the university- “a noble woman who throughout his life was his patient and devoted companion and helpmate, his assistant, his advisor, his inspiration” (Thayer and Valléry-Radot). In 1854 he moved to the University of Lille, where he was became a chemistry professor....   [tags: Biography ]
:: 3 Works Cited
909 words
(2.6 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Comparsen Between The Book And Movie Cujo - Watching the movie is so much more interesting, and it grabs your imagination by the hand. There are not that many things that are different in the movie. In fact the movie describes what?s going on a little better than the book. Basically the book seems like an out line of the whole story and the book gets into details a little more. In the beginning of the book it talks about Tad going to bed and how he?s a little nervous because he thinks there is a monster under his bed. His father tucks him into bed and says good night....   [tags: essays research papers] 536 words
(1.5 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
The Ebola Virus - The Ebola Virus History of, Occurrences, and Effects of Ebola, a virus which acquires its name from the Ebola River (located in Zaire, Africa), first emerged in September 1976, when it erupted simultaneously in 55 villages near the headwaters of the river. It seemed to come out of nowhere, and resulted in the deaths of nine out of every ten victims. Although it originated over 20 years ago, it still remains as a fear among African citizens, where the virus has reappeared occasionally in parts of the continent....   [tags: essays research papers] 1222 words
(3.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The play of to Kill a Mocking Bird. Discuss how you would produce - The play of to Kill a Mocking Bird. Discuss how you would produce the incident in which Atticus shoots the rabid dog "The play of To Kill a Mocking Bird" was adapted from a novel by Harper Lee. The story is set in Maycomb, Alabama in 1935, when racism was rife. The play deals with racism and shows how the blacks were exploited. The play is split into two acts; Act One is about a black man being wrongly accused of raping a white woman. It is in Act Two that the audience finds out that the legal system would wrongly convict a man, just because he is black....   [tags: English Literature] 1238 words
(3.5 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Character Flaws in Literature - Everyone has at least has a flaw in their life. Nothing is perfect or else everything would move in peace loving harmony. If everything was perfect we wouldn't have to compete with one another. It is these flaws we have that make us unique individuals. Each of the main characters at least had a characteristic that stopped them from being with each other. It was both physical and mental problems that caused their dilemmas. In Their Eyes Were Watching God, Janie had a beautiful vision of love when she was young....   [tags: Comparative Literature] 1065 words
(3 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Animal Testing - Animal Testing In the 1880’s, Louis Pasteur conducted one of the most unpleasant series of animal experiments in the history of the fight against infectious disease. Unable to see the organism that causes rabies with the microscopes available, he convinced a skeptical medical community of the microorganism’s existence and also the possibility of vaccinating against it. He did this by doing work on rabbits and dogs. In 1885, after much heart searching, he tried out his rabies vaccine on a nine-year old boy, Joseph Meister, who had been bitten 14 times by a rabid dog....   [tags: Papers] 686 words
(2 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Understanding the Importance of Immunisation - Understanding the Importance of Immunisation According to http://www.amfar.org/cgi-bin/iowa/bridge.html, immunisation is the administration of antigenic components of an infectious agent to stimulate a protective immune response. Immunisation is a technique that is used to increase immunity to specific diseases in humans by exposing the individual to an anti-gen in order to raise ant-bodies to that anti-gen. Immunisation is a way of protecting against serious diseases such as tuberculosis and polio....   [tags: Papers] 1595 words
(4.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Work of a Veterinarian - Are you passionate about pets. Maybe you should think about becoming a veterinarian. The job outlook for this field is good. According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook, employment of veterinarians is expected to grow faster than the average for all occupations through the year 2012.(pg.121) Veterinary practices are your average everyday local animal hospital, dealing only with domestic animals unless the hospital specializes on a specific type of animal. Rural veterinarians deal with the larger animals such as livestock and any average farm animal such as cows, pigs, goats....   [tags: Animal Science, informative] 1406 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Do People Really Know What is Sacrificed for Animal Testing? - ... Consumer product safety, basic scientific research, and applied medical research. Consumer products such as cosmetics and cleaners are used on animals to determine how toxic the product is. “For years, industry has determined the toxicity of floor wax, and detergents by injecting various substances into the stomachs of beagles, rabbits, and calves. Producing vomiting, convulsions respiratory illnesses and paralysis. The so- called LD (lethal dose) 50 testes ends only when half the animals in a test group have died....   [tags: Animal Rights ]
:: 3 Works Cited
940 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Medical Beneifits Of Animal Testing - Argument Essay Where would we be Without Animal Testing. Is the use of animals in research justified. Should animal experimentation be permitted. Should these animals be liberated. A logical person would say the benefits justify the research. Without animal testing, products would be based on theory. No one would want to use something, which may damage eyes, be poisonous, cancerous, and cause birth defects. Animals used in testing are not from the endangered species list; also many of the types of animals used are killed each year by rat or mouse traps, animal control, exterminators, and animal shelters....   [tags: essays research papers] 390 words
(1.1 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
The Need to Vaccinate Infants and Travellers - The Need to Vaccinate Infants and Travellers Vaccinations are given in infancy and to travellers against various diseases that can kill but are preventable due to the modernisation of medicine. I have put together a brief over view of the need to administer such vaccines. The disease's that are vaccinated against in infancy are: diphtheria, whooping cough, tetanus, polio, hib, measles, mumps, rubella and tuberculosis. Diphtheria is a serious disease that begins with a sore throat and can quickly cause breathing problems....   [tags: Papers] 422 words
(1.2 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Disease vs. Humans: The Evolutionary Race - Disease vs. Humans: The Evolutionary Race Dramatic changes in living conditions and population structure are usually associated with the changes caused by the Industrial Revolution. Massive migration to cities and the development of urban centers which followed increased the likelihood of disease spread and evolution, and has also increased disease persistence. Diseases use cities (places where hundreds, thousands and millions of people are in very close quarters with each other) as a super highway; cities provide the perfect infrastructure for disease travel....   [tags: Journalistic Essays]
:: 2 Sources Cited
572 words
(1.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Animal Testing for Humanity - Animal Testing for Humanity      Animal research is vital to human existence. This testing enables doctors to find treatments and cures for various diseases and aliments. The people, who object and think that 'mad' scientists preform all animal research, merely do not understand the importance. There are many regulatory acts protecting the animals in experiments, therefore proving that ending animal research all together would be a harsh blow to society.      The regulations, such as the Animal Welfare Act, which ensures that animal, care for research is a main priority....   [tags: Animal Testing Research Essays Argumentative] 550 words
(1.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Emotional Hinderance - Emotional Hinderance “You must put your emotions into your work” is a phrase often heard in life. It proposes that emotions, which are often ignored, are a key to success. This holds true in many regards, however there are times when emotion should be restricted in swaying one’s thoughts. The pursuit of knowledge is to be completely objective. Thus, although emotional intelligence is necessary, it is more of a hindrance than a help, and should be controlled. Since knowledge is justified true belief, it follows that the justification must be logical and true in itself....   [tags: essays research papers] 529 words
(1.5 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Chapter Ten of To Kill a Mockingbird - Remind yourself of the passage in chapter 10 where Atticus shoots the mad dog. Remind yourself of the passage in chapter 10 where Atticus shoots the mad dog. What is the importance of this incident in the novel as a whole. The importance of this incident in the novel as a whole is to show that Atticus has real courage and bravery. This is shown by his ability to shoot a rabid dog which relates to his bravery for taking on Tom’s case, when he knows it is highly unlikely he will not win. In this chapter Jem and Scout find out that their dad, Atticus, has a hidden talent....   [tags: English Literature] 623 words
(1.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Banning Fox Hunting - Banning Fox Hunting I have studied Fox hunting, and I agree wholeheartedly with this statement. I have heard interviews with hunt supporters in which they say that fox hunting does a huge job for farmers in keeping fox numbers down. I cannot believe that this is true, and having researched it on the internet I have found that at least 2 scientific studies have concluded that statistically the numbers of foxes killed by hunts is insignificant. I appreciate that killing the fox and keeping numbers down is not the only reason that hunts take place, but it is often used as an excuse for the purpose of fox hunting; hence hunt supporters appear to contradict themselves in their response to individual questions on why they hunt and group responses to political criticism or pressure from animal rights groups....   [tags: Papers] 552 words
(1.6 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Animal Experimentation: Granted for the Good - Animal Experimentation: Granted for the Good The fight for animal rights has been going on for many decades and has increased even more in the past years. Animal rights advocate that animals should be viewed as human beings, not property. These advocates approach the issue from different situations but they all agree that animal should not be used as food, clothing, entertainment, or experimentation. Vivisection is one right that has gained more controversy than all the others. Vivisection is the act of operating or experimenting on live animals....   [tags: Animal Research] 625 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Dying for Love in Of Love and Other Demons by Gabriel Garcia Marquez - Dying for Love in "Of Love and Other Demons" by Gabriel Garcia Marquez Based on part of the XVIII century, when the prevalent times of the Spanish Inquisition dominated the powers of the society and the people was ruled by an orthodox way of thinking, Gabriel Garcia Marquez gives birth to "Of Love and Other Demons". According to The American Heritage Dictionary, Inquisition was a former Roman Catholic tribunal established to suppress heresy. The term Heresy originally meant a belief that one arrived at by oneself (Greek hairesis, "choosing for oneself"), and it is any religious doctrine opposed to the dogma of a particular church, especially a doctrine held by a person professing faith in the teachings of that church....   [tags: Of Love Other Demons Essays Marquez]
:: 1 Works Cited
1766 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Marijuana, Medicine, and Politics - Marijuana, Medicine, and Politics        Abstract: For the past few decades, debate has ensued over the putative medicinal value of marijuana. These claims extend back over 4000 thousand years ago to ancient civilizations on the Asian continent. More recently, some scientists experimenting with cannabis have found evidence to support these claims. However, the United States federal government has remained reluctant in supporting further research characterizing the therapeutic properties of cannabis....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Essay Examples]
:: 20 Works Cited
3410 words
(9.7 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Characters, Themes and Imagery in Their Eyes Were Watching God - Characters, Themes and Imagery in Their Eyes Were Watching God         Zora Neale Hurston was one of the first widely acclaimed black writers to "assimilate folk tradition into modern literature and express her interpretations of the black culture throughout her books" (Bailey, 175).  She was also one of the most influential of black American writers during the twentieth century because she exceeded the barriers of race, sex and poverty.  Hurston's most acclaimed work is said to be Their Eyes Were Watching God, and has been read, adored, rejected, reviewed, and badgered by many literary critics.  "In a book rich with imagery and black oral tradition, Zora Neale Hurston tells us of a woman's journey that gives the lie to Freud's assertion that 'the difficult development which leads to femininity seems to exhaust all the possibilities of the individual'" (Morgan, 163).  In this as well as in other of her writings, Hurston expresses many of her opinions of race relations, sexism, and classism through her characters, themes and imagery....   [tags: Their Eyes Were Watching God Essays]
:: 7 Works Cited
2988 words
(8.5 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Comparing Dreams in Catcher in the Rye, Night, and Their Eyes Were Watching God - Dreams in Catcher in the Rye, Night, and Their Eyes Were Watching God     Throughout the novels Catcher in the Rye, Night, and Their Eyes Were Watching God, the main characters seem to have a dream. In their stories, Holden, Elie, and Janie tell the reader whether or not their dream was successful.   In Catcher in the Rye, Holden's dream is to be the catcher in the rye, meaning he wants to stop children or anything that may still be innocent from falling over the edge. This basically means he wants to preserve the innocence....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 2 Sources Cited
917 words
(2.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Janie's Metamorphosis in Their Eyes Were Watching God - Janie's Metamorphosis in Their Eyes Were Watching God   "Dey all useter call me Alphabet 'cause so many people had done named me different names," Janie innocently expresses (Hurston 9). The nickname "Alphabet" is appropriate in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God because she is indefinable to others and herself. From her early childhood, Janie Crawford searches for self-knowledge and grows through her relationships with men, family, and society. The main character continually seeks autonomy and self-realization, but her quest cannot continue as long as she is the object of others....   [tags: Their Eyes Were Watching God Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 1 Works Consulted :: 1 Sources Cited
1588 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Love in Their Eyes Were Watching God - Love in Their Eyes Were Watching God Love plays a very important role in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes were watching God. Janie spent her days looking for love. She thought of love just as she thought of the elements of springtime: Sunny days, bright skies, a bee pollinating pear tree blossoms. She searched far and wide for this kind of perfect love. Logan Killicks couldn't give this kind of love to Janie. He may not have loved her at all. To him, Janie was just another working set of hands....   [tags: Their Eyes Were Watching God Essays] 639 words
(1.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Love in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God - Love in Zora Neale Hurston's Their Eyes Were Watching God The novel Their Eyes Were Watching God by Zora Neale Hurston (1937) is a search for self-fulfillment and true love. On a porch in a small town called Eatonville a story is told about an attractive African American women's journey. Her name is Janie Crawford. Her struggle to find companionship and herself starts as a young girl who had lost both of her parents. She lives with her grandmother who is a nanny for a wealthy white family. Janie would play with the children without realizing a difference in their race....   [tags: Their Eyes Were Watching God Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
856 words
(2.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Joys of Animal Research, Testing, and Experimentation - The Joys of Animal Testing Animal rights are held entirely too high in regard. Many activist do not realize the benefits of testing on animals. They claim that it is "unethical" or "cruel" to perform experiments on such creatures. The truth is, the world as a whole has advanced tremendously in the past century due to animal experimentation. We are affected every day by at least one thing that has been influenced by animal testing. Many of the things we take for granted would not exist if it were not for experimenting with animals....   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Essays] 2788 words
(8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
The Amazing Edgar Allan Poe - The Amazing Edgar Allan Poe Edgar Allen Poe suffered from depression, which made his writings tragically beautiful, and if you lived his life, you probably would have been depressed too. He was born in 1809 to a couple of actors. He was two when his father abandoned him. His mother, unable to take care of him, left him with John and Frances Allen. His mother died soon after that. The Allens gave him a good upbringing, but never legally adopted him, leaving him as something of an outcast. Much of Poe’s life was spent struggling....   [tags: Biography Biographies Essays]
:: 4 Sources Cited
1234 words
(3.5 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Similarities Between Hurston’s Novels, Seraph on the Suwanee and Their Eyes Were Watching God - Similarities Between Hurston’s Novels, Seraph on the Suwanee and Their Eyes Were Watching God Seraph – page 153 So, calling soothingly to Earl, Jim started from the south border of the sink hole and began to pick along to where Earl stood braced between two great cypress trees. Earl’s face was cold and unrecognizing. Jim caught hold to vines and shrubs to keep from slipping off the precarious footing into the water, and said nice things to Earl and kept going. He was a good half way along the dangerous route when Earl stepped forth and leveled the rifle and took aim....   [tags: Compare Comparison Essays] 758 words
(2.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
The Adaptive Parasite - The Adaptive Parasite Viruses are molecular sharks, a motive without a mind. They have sorted themselves into tribes, and they infect everything that lives. . . . Unknown viruses are coming out of the equatorial wildernesses of the earth and discovering the human race. . . . You might call AIDS the revenge of the rainforest. (Preston 160-61) After reading Richard Preston's ominous and threatening portrayal of viruses in his article "Crisis In The Hot Zone," one may be alarmed enough to invest in surgical scrubs and a space suit to wear as a permanent precaution against these evidently vengeful creatures....   [tags: Viruses Virus Essays] 3138 words
(9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Physiological Effects of Marijuana - The Physiological Effects of Marijuana Marijuana derives from the dried leaves and flower of the hemp plant Cannabis sativa; for thousands of years, physicians regarded marijuana as a useful pharmaceutical agent that could be used to treat a number of different disorders. In the 19th century, physicians in the United States and Europe used marijuana as an analgesic, as a treatment for migraine headaches, and as an anticonvulsant (Grinspoon & Bakalar, 1993, 1995). In 1938, a physician used marijuana (hashish) to completely control the terror and excitement of a patient who had contracted rabies (Elliot, 1992, p....   [tags: Illegal Drugs Health Essays]
:: 11 Works Cited
1249 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Speech on Ferrets - Speech on Ferrets Introduction: I. Ferrets are amusing creatures that can make good pets. II. Many people would be interested in a low maintenance pet that is softer than a turtle and more affectionate than a goldfish. III. I currently have three ferrets. I got my first one about five years ago. I found my second and third ferrets a couple of years later at the Oregon Ferret Shelter, where I ended up adopting them for a modest price. I have also volunteered at the shelter now and then and have learned a lot about them....   [tags: Speech Speeches] 939 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Controversial Issue of Animal Ethics - The Controversial Issue of Animal Ethics The struggle against sickness and disease is not over, yet medical progress is being threatened by activists who would end the use of laboratory animals in the search for treatment and cures. Their well financed anti-research disinformation campaign is not the only weapon used by animal rights activists. The more extreme animal rights activists have used tactics of intimidation and terrorism, for example: April 26,1997, activists were arrested when they tried to force their way into Yerkes Regional Primate center during a protest....   [tags: essays papers]
:: 19 Sources Cited
2571 words
(7.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Animals Save Lives - Animals Save Lives Suppose a family member was suffering from a disease and the doctor announced that thanks to animal research they are coming close to finding a cure. Would it then be acceptable to experiment new drugs and treatments on animals, even if it meant death for the animal. This is a controversial issue, which has many divided as to whether animal testing is a good or bad thing. The vast majority of animal research is; however, devoted to finding curse for human disease....   [tags: Essays Papers]
:: 6 Sources Cited
865 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Agression - Many psychologists have done research in the field of anger and aggression as it is one of the most common emotions experienced by humans. If prolonged, it can lead to devastating effects such as depression, headaches and various other disorders. A lot of work is being done to help people over come anger and to learn to forgive others. Anger is a feeling which results due to unfulfilled expectations, injustice, frustration, injury or it might be biologically determined. Aggression is the action you take in response to your anger i.e....   [tags: essays research papers] 2213 words
(6.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Animal Experimentation - Animal Experimentation Introduction Animal experimentation has been a part of biomedical and behavioral research for several millennia; experiments with animals were conducted in Greece over 2,000 years ago. Many advances in medicine and in the understanding of how organisms function have been the direct result of animal experimentation. Concern over the welfare of laboratory animals is also not new, as reflected in the activities of various animal welfare and antivivisectionist groups dating back to the nineteenth century....   [tags: essays research papers] 1805 words
(5.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Animal Rights - For the past 20 years, there has a been an on going heated debate on whether experiments on animals for the benefit of medical and scientific research is ethical. Whether it is or isn't, most people believe that some form of cost-benefit test should be performed to determine if the action is right. The costs include: animal pain, distress and death where the benefits include the collection of new knowledge or the development of new medical therapies for humans. Looking into these different aspects of the experimentation, there is a large gap for argument between the different scientists' views....   [tags: essays research papers] 1137 words
(3.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Animals Are Good - cures await discovery. Although the list is pretty much endless, here are some examples, by decade, including the main species used that were crucial to the discovery: Pre-1900: Treatment for rabies (dogs, rabbits), smallpox (cows), anthrax (sheep). 1900s: Cardiac catheterization techniques (dogs, rabbits), treatment for rickets (dogs). 1920s: Discovery of insulin (dogs). 1930s: Development of modern anesthesia (dogs), prevention of tetanus (horses), development of anticoagulants (cats). 1940s: Treatment of rheumatoid arthritis (rabbits, monkeys), discovery of the RH factor (monkeys), prevention of diptheria (horses), antibiotics (rats, mice, rabbits, etc), treatment for whooping cough (pigs and rabbits)....   [tags: essays research papers] 747 words
(2.1 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Australian Poet Kenneth Slessor's Use of Imagery - Australian Poet Kenneth Slessor's Use of Imagery Slessor's complex poems use many types of imagery, his imagery is one of his artistic techniques which defines him from other poets in Australia. One could say that his powerful words paint a picture for the reader but as they say, seeing is believing. Slessor uses many types of imagery however death, time and water are the main ones. He uses these in his poems Night Ride, Out of Time, Five Bells and Beach Burial. Slessor in Night Ride talks about the journey of life, he talks of death as being slow, depressive and lonely....   [tags: Night Ride Out of Time Five Bells Beach Burial] 673 words
(1.9 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Sister Carrie and Their Eyes Were Watching God - The Struggle for the Perfect Man in Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God When we find a love interest and have an opportunity to commit to him or her, we usually do, not noting the consequences we may face by doing so. The first few times around, however, the outcome is usually not the one we had expected and hoped for. Theodore Dreiser’s Sister Carrie and Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God portray two young women on their trek to find the perfect love....   [tags: Compare Contrast Comparison] 765 words
(2.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Eastern Gray Kangaroo Management Plan - The Macropus giganteus, otherwise known as the Eastern Gray Kangaroo, the Giant Gray Kangaroo, or the Tasmanian Forester, is found in the eastern parts of Australia and in Tasmania. A management plan for this species can prove to be difficult, as one has to take in to account the fact that having high kangaroo populations may have undesirable influences on ecological processes in response to habitat destruction or other environmental change that may pose a threat to biological diversity or other environmental values....   [tags: essays research papers] 956 words
(2.7 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Ebola - Ebola Ebola hemorrahagic fever is a 20 year old virus that, with a mortality rate of 50% to 90%, is one of the world's deadliest viruses. Its causative organism is called Ebola virus. Ebola virus is a member of filoviridae, a family of negative-strained RNA viruses. The filoviridae family consists of five known members, Marburg, Ebola Zaire, Ebola Sudan, Ebola Reston, and Ebola Tai. Ebola virus is spread in a number of ways. An outbreak starts when an infected animal or insect, called a vector, transmits the virus to a human....   [tags: essays research papers] 1320 words
(3.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Encephalitis - - ENCEPHALITIS Encephalitis literally means an inflammation of the brain, but it usually refers to brain inflammation caused by a virus. It may also be called “acute viral encephalitis or aseptic encephalitis';. Encephalitis is an infectious disease of the Central Nervous System characterized by pathologic changes in both the gray and white matter of the spinal cord and brain. It may be due to specific disease entity such as rabies or an arthropod-borne virus (arbovirus), or it may occur as a sequela of influenza, measles, German measles, chicken pox, herpes virus infection, small pox, vaccinia, or other diseases....   [tags: essays research papers] 683 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Endangered Species - Endangerment is a broad issue, one that involves the animals as well as the environments where they live and interact with one another. In order to solve or even slightly elevate this problem, every aspect must be studied. So exactly what could cause the endangerment of animals. There are several factors of which only a few will be discussed. One of the main aspects is that of habitat destruction. Of course our planet is continually changing, causing habitats to be altered and modified, but these tend to happen at a gradual pace....   [tags: essays research papers] 1073 words
(3.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Potential of Medical Marijuana - The Potential of Medical Marijuana      Marijuana is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world (7). Since it became illegal in 1967 (5), there have been many questions of whether or not it is good for purposes, such as medicine. Debates between people that are for and against the use of marijuana in medicine have been heated and in recent years, referendums have been brought up in at least three states to make it available for medical treatment. Personally, I think that marijuana has the power to be a significant help with certain aliments, however, I think that more research is needed to prove its medical potential....   [tags: Marijuana Medicine Treatment Essays]
:: 9 Sources Cited
2510 words
(7.2 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Louis Pasteur - Louis Pasteur Louis Pasteur was an example of a truly gifted person who made many wildly diverse discoveries in many different areas of science. He was a world-renowned French chemist and biologist whose work paved the way for branches of science and medicine such as stereochemistry, microbiology, virology, immunology, and molecular biology. He also proved the germ theory of disease, invented the process of pasteurization, fermentation, and developed vaccines for many diseases, including rabies....   [tags: Biographies Biography Pasteur Essays] 1357 words
(3.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Medical Advances 1850-1910 - The contributions of several doctors, researchers, and scientists helped improve the health of the growing population. In 1850 the average life expectancy was 42 years. By 1910 the average life expectancy had risen to nearly 55 years. Between 1850 and 1910 there were several advances in the medical field. The introduction of genes, white blood cells, blood groups, insulin, rubber gloves, aspirin, and vitamins and the discoveries of Pasteur, Charcot, Halsted, Zirm, Lister, and Koch were the starting point of an international fight against disease....   [tags: essays research papers] 747 words
(2.1 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
people - EDGAR ALLAN POE 1809 - 1849 “Quoth the Raven, “Nevermore” Edgar Allan Poe – Darkness Dark what is dark. It is defined in the dictionary as: Darkadj 1.Being without light or without much light. 2. Not a light in colour<a~suit> 3.Gloomy. 4. Being without knowledge and culture<The Dark ages> 5.Secretive – darklyadv – Dark-ness n. dark2n 1.Absance of light: Darkness; esp.: night 2. A dark or deep colour – in the dark 1. In secrecy. 2. In ignorance. Dark is a major part of Edgar Allan Poe’s work....   [tags: essays research papers] 703 words
(2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Their Eyes Were Watching God - Their Eyes Were Watching God Theme Many times the love that a person is looking for is the one that a person doesn't realize. Setting The author begins and ends the book on a porch where Janie is telling her story to her friend Pheobe Watson. The book begins in the morning on the porch and then ends at night, symbolic of beginning and end. In between these two times Janie is telling her story which travels through the state of Florida. Style In this book, Hurston writes in the dielect of the black community of the time....   [tags: essays research papers] 6207 words
(17.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Vaccinations: A Clear Benefit - Vaccinations: A Clear Benefit Vaccination: A Clear Benefit A clear definition of a vaccination is, “the generic term for immunization procedures. Immunization is a procedure whereby living or nonliving materials are introduced into the body…:” (Nosal, 1999) The concept that people who survive an infectious disease do not get the same disease again is the basis for the administering of vaccinations. Vaccines are normally given to healthy individuals for the prevention of diseases....   [tags: essays research papers] 1967 words
(5.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
virus - Virus Overview The virus was first thought about in 1883 when A. Mayer was seeking to find the cause of the tobacco mosaic disease. Though he was unable to see them with the microscopy of his day, he postulated that a small agent caused the disease. D. Ivanowsky, later tried tests as well and also concluded that it was a disease caused by something smaller than they could see. The virus was first found and discovered in 1935 by Wendell Stanly. He was able to crystallize the virus, now known as the tobacco mosaic virus....   [tags: essays research papers] 1078 words
(3.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Jem Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird - Jem Finch in To Kill A Mockingbird “To kill a Mockingbird” by Harper Lee is set a small town called Maycomb in Alabama, in the 1930s. The community of Maycomb is of mixed ethnicity and like most places of that time the white people believe they were the dominant race. The book is seen through the eyes of two children: Jem and Scout Finch who are growing up in this society. As Jem gets older he becomes conscious of the fact that this community and these adults who surround him are not always right and this makes him feel lost....   [tags: English Literature] 1229 words
(3.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee - Answers - To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee Question : On giving Jem and Scout air rifles, Atticus tells them that to kill a mockingbird is a sin. Miss Maudie explains that mockingbirds only do one thing, and that is to sing their hearts out for us. Who are the mockingbirds in the story, and how have they been ‘killed’ by the society around them. Ideas : The two main mockingbirds are Boo Radley and Tom Robinson, but there are others within the storyline. Boo Radley has been shut away from the world by his father and then later his brother through an incident which occurred fifteen years earlier when he stabbed his father with a pair of scissors....   [tags: English Literature] 1294 words
(3.7 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
The Significance of the Setting of To Kill a Mockingbird - An Analysis of the Significance of the Setting of To Kill a Mockingbird Set in Maycomb County, Harper Lee’s novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, is set in a town where racism is prevalent. Harper Lee’s novel raises key themes to instil into the reader many ethics to combat these racist attitudes and inculcate other moral values. These themes are enforced by the setting and it is through the setting that Harper Lee emphasises the principles laid down by the novel. The setting is also used metaphorically to describe the themes in To Kill a Mockingbird....   [tags: English Literature] 1568 words
(4.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Genetic Engeneering of Food - Genetic Engeneering of Food Throughout the United States and the rest of the globe, genetically engineered food products are becoming increasingly used in agricultural and manufactured food goods. Because of the increase of genetically altered foods, an increasing population has become hesitant to accept the products and agriculture derived from genetic engineering. The large increase in genetically engineered foods has proved to have adverse health effects on humans. These health risks are becoming increasingly common as we continue to genetically alter foods....   [tags: Environment Science Debate Engineering Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited :: 4 Sources Cited
1473 words
(4.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Louis Pasteur - Louis Pasteur Louis Pasteur made many valuable contributions in the science field. These findings in chemistry, industry, and medicine are still appreciated today. Louis Pasteur saved many lives because of his findings and research. This chemist devoted much of his life improving the welfare of man-kind. Louis Pasteur was born on December 27, 1822, in Dole, a small town on the eastern part of England. As a young boy, Louis was very quiet and had an incredible desire in drawing and artwork....   [tags: Essays Papers]
:: 1 Sources Cited
1188 words
(3.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Innovations of the Industrial Revolution - Innovations of the Industrial Revolution As one of the greatest times of production and change in the quality of life for all classes and members of society, the Industrial Revolution marked a turning point for humankind. Together, the industrial revolutions in both America and Britain not only altered the lifestyles of many, but also offered solutions to many questions that had plagued society for numerous years. Changes that occurred in the fields of medicine and chemistry still play a role in our everyday lives....   [tags: Essays Papers]
:: 2 Sources Cited
889 words
(2.5 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee - To Kill A Mockingbird: Why has Harper Lee written this novel through the words of a young child. "To Kill a Mockingbird" is a novel by Harper Lee, based on characters that lived in Maycomb County, Alabama in the Southern United States during the 1930s. The story was based to some extent on true events, and was told using the perspective of a young child, Jean-Louise, "Scout" Finch. The story spanned a period of approximately 3 years, beginning as a 6 year old Scout prepares to start school, during the first summer that Scout and her older brother, Jem's friend, Dill came to Maycomb....   [tags: English Literature] 2830 words
(8.1 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]


Your search returned 128 essays for "rabies":
[1] [2] [Next >>]



Copyright © 2000-2011 123HelpMe.com. All rights reserved. Terms of Service