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Your search returned over 400 essays for "plains indians"
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Mongols and Plains Indians - Two cultures, thousands of miles apart, show similarities that would be expected of neighboring civilizations. Both cultures arose on similar terrain. This terrain was a luscious grassland. One civilization grew up in Midwest North America, the other in Central Asia. The first civilization was the Plains Indians. The second was the Mongols. Each culture had a common form of religion. This religion was shamanism. Wordiq defines it as "a range of traditional beliefs and practices that involve the ability to diagnose, cure, and sometimes cause human suffering because of a special relationship with, or control over, spirits." The cultures were also affected by the horse....   [tags: Comparative, Cultures] 1809 words
(5.2 pages)
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Explaination of Horse Culture in Plains Indians Summaries by Hämäläinen - I. Introduction In the introduction, Hämäläinen introduces how Plains Indians horse culture is so often romanticized in the image of the “mounted warrior,” and how this romanticized image is frequently juxtaposed with the hardships of disease, death, and destruction brought on by the Europeans. It is also mentioned that many historians depict Plains Indians equestrianism as a typical success story, usually because such a depiction is an appealing story to use in textbooks. However, Plains Indians equestrianism is far from a basic story of success....   [tags: equestrianism, expansion, competition] 1461 words
(4.2 pages)
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Plains Indians - For many tribes of Plains Indians whose bison-hunting culture flourished during the 18th and 19th centuries, the sun dance was the major communal religious ceremony . . . the rite celebrates renewal - the spiritual rebirth of participants and their relatives as well as the regeneration of the living earth with all its components . . . The ritual, involving sacrifice and supplication to insure harmony between all living beings, continues to be practiced by many contemporary native Americans. -Elizabeth Atwood LawrenceAs the most important ritual of the nomadic Plains Indians, the Sun Dance in itself presents many ideas, beliefs, and values of these cultures....   [tags: essays research papers] 1750 words
(5 pages)
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Contested Plains by Elliot West - There are many ways in which we can view the history of the American West. One view is the popular story of Cowboys and Indians. It is a grand story filled with adventure, excitement and gold. Another perspective is one of the Native Plains Indians and the rich histories that spanned thousands of years before white discovery and settlement. Elliot West’s book, Contested Plains: Indians, Goldseekers and the Rush to Colorado, offers a view into both of these worlds. West shows how the histories of both nations intertwine, relate and clash all while dealing with complex geological and environmental challenges....   [tags: american west, indians, great plains]
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1191 words
(3.4 pages)
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Tecumseh: Great Leader of the Great Plains Indians - Tecumseh: Great Leader of the Great Plains Indians A. Introduction B. Early life 1. Birth and influences 2. American Events C. Plan For an Indian Confederation D. Forming the Confederation 1. Religious Support 2. Campaigning throughout the frontier 3. Treaty of Fort Wayne E. Battle of Tippecanoe F. Weakening of the Confederation G. Looking for British support H. War of 1812 1. Allying with the British 2. Asisiting the British war effort 3. Campaigning with the Upper Creeks 4. Retreating from the front and Tecumseh’s death I....   [tags: American History]
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2705 words
(7.7 pages)
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Native American Conflicts - On the summer days of June 25-26, 1876 the Battle of the Little Bighorn took place in the southeastern area of the Montana territory. The battlefield is very close to the Little Bighorn River itself, in what is now present day Big Horn County, Montana. The adversaries in this battle were the U.S. Army’s 7th Cavalry, commanded by General George A. Custer against the Indian tribes of the Northern Cheyenne, Lakota Sioux, and Arapaho under the leadership of Sitting Bull. Several years after the Civil War had ended, the U.S....   [tags: indians, plains, army] 2534 words
(7.2 pages)
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Indians of Native America - The Cheyenne tribe of Native American Indians are what is now the most well known and prominent of Indian tribes that have ever settled in North America. They originally lived in villages, in some of the eastern parts of the country and occupied much of what is today, Minnesota, until they were forced to migrate to the Great Plains around 1800s (Grinnell). From being moved into the plains, the Cheyenne tribe separated into Northern Cheyenne and the Southern Cheyenne and their land ranged from the Missouri River to the Arkansas River....   [tags: indian tribes, the cheyenne, great plains]
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1126 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Cheyenne Indians are Disappearing - The Cheyenne have wandered the plains of the midwest for centuries, until now. People today have shrunk their land down so far that they have little exploring to do and less places to just ride until dusk. There used to be thousands of acres and people , now there is only hundreds because the Americans did not like them. The Cheyenne, like other natives, came from Siberia, then traveled across the narrow Bering Strait that originally joined Asia and Alaska. Shai-ela is the Sioux word for Cheyenne, meaning “people who speak a strange language.” Before they found buffalo, the men caught deer, rabbits, and fish, while the women took care of crops and gathering berries....   [tags: plains, native americans, buffalo]
:: 6 Works Cited
777 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Disappearance of the Plains Indian culture - The Disappearance of the Plains Indian culture ‘It was the lack of buffalo that killed off the Plains Indian culture in the 20th century’. In some respects this traditional historical statement is true; however, I believe that many views which revisionist historians believe also contributed greatly to the disappearance of the Plains Indian culture in the 20th century. The traditional historian’s view that the lack of buffalo did contribute severely to the Plains Indian culture is true, because their lives revolved around and depended on the buffalo....   [tags: Papers] 1606 words
(4.6 pages)
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Influence of Settlers on the Indians - In the 1830's the Plains Indians were sent to the Great American Deserts in the west because the white men did not think they deserved the land. Afterwards, they were able to live peacefully, and to follow their traditions and customs, but when the white men found out the land they were on were still good for agricultural, or even for railroad land they took it back. Thus, the white man movement westward quickly begun. This prospect to expand westward caused the government to become thoroughly involved in the lives of the Plains Indians....   [tags: History AP US] 905 words
(2.6 pages)
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The Comanche Indians - The Comanche Indians The Comanche have most recently been found in the Southern Plains, which stretches from Nebraska to the northern part of Texas. They were fully in Texas by the 1700’s. It is believed that the Comanche derived from the Shoshone Indians, found in Wyoming. The language spoken by the Comanche is actually a form of Uto-Aztecan language that when compared to the Shoshone language, the two are very similar. The Comanche’s were great warriors and did not really indulge in religious practices too much nor did they use folktales or legends very often....   [tags: Papers] 567 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Ojibway Indians - ... The Ojibway language is from the Algonquian language family. Ojibway words are very long and hard to pronounce. Here is a few of the Ojibway words translated into English. Mee-gwetch means thank you, Muckadaymashkeekiwabu is the word coffee, and Ahnimooshug is the Ojibway word for dogs. Weapons, Hunting, and Tools Ojibway warriors use bows, arrows, clubs, axes, and flails. A flail is a handle connected to a spiky ball with a chain. It was very hard to control. If they swung the chain the wrong way, the spiky ball could hit them and cause injury or death....   [tags: chippewa, ojibway, settlers] 861 words
(2.5 pages)
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Travelers in Emigrants Crossing the Plains by Albert Bierstadt - I can’t believe it. We’re moving at a rate faster than ever before – almost 10 miles were covered since daybreak and it isn’t even the evening yet. We’ve been moving since 4 in the morning. Some pesky Indians came in the way when we were herding up our cattle but I know dad and his friends took care of the issue. I made my own breakfast today too, we call it Johnnycake. You mix some cornmeal with salt and water; I’ve heard they’ve been eating this stuff since the 1730s. I finished eating real quick to go with my father to the front....   [tags: manifest destiny, transcendentalism] 1537 words
(4.4 pages)
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Cree Indians - Cree Indians This is an introduction to the Cree Indians way of life explaining about the foods they ate, significance of story telling, myths, religious beliefs, rituals performed, and their present day way of life. It is almost impossible to touch on every aspect because of what is not printed and only known by elders. Some native words used by Cree Indians: Kiwetin meaning the north wind that brings misfortune (Gill, Sullivan 158). Another word is maskwa used for bear, the most intelligent and spiritually powerful land animal (Gill, Sullivan 182)....   [tags: essays papers]
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3167 words
(9 pages)
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Comanche Indians - COMANCHE INDIANS The Comanches, exceptional horsemen who dominated the Southern Plains, played a prominent role in Texas frontier history throughout much of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Anthropological evidence indicates that they were originally a mountain tribe, a branch of the Northern Shoshones, who roamed the Great Basin region of the western United States as crudely equipped hunters and gatherers. Both cultural and linguistic similarities confirm the Comanches' Shoshone origins....   [tags: essays research papers] 2746 words
(7.8 pages)
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Sioux Indians - Sioux Indians We're going to tell you about a tribe of Indians known as the Sioux Indians. The Sioux Indians lived on the great plains. The Sioux's tribe is partially and fully located in 7 states. The states are known as Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Montana, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin. Their natural resources include deer, beans, wild rice, and buffalo. The Sioux nation was divided into 7 groups. They were known as the 7 council fires. Each council fire had its own leaders and own group of families that always camped together....   [tags: American History] 1412 words
(4 pages)
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Indians in Unexpected Places - Deloria, with his analytical survey, Indians in Unexpected Places, recounts the synthesis of western white expectations, and American Indians. The book takes its title from the general thesis, which explores not only the relationship between Indians and their introduction into an alien culture, but also the expectations that we have of Indians and how they “should” interact with our white western culture. According to Deloria, the common notion is that, “Indian people, corralled on isolated and impoverished reservations, missed out on modernity- indeed, almost missed out of history itself.” (Deloria p....   [tags: Non-Fiction Literature, persuasive] 893 words
(2.6 pages)
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Sioux Indians, Tantanka Yotanka, Custer's Last Stand - Sioux Indians, Tantanka Yotanka, Custer's Last Stand The Sioux Indians are a large Indian group, located North of Mexico. The actual Sioux name, Nadouessioux means little snakes. The Sioux Indians moved from the east and then ended up near the Mississippi, then moved again to somewhere around Dakota, a little north of Mexico. They referred to themselves as the Otecti Cacowin (Seven Council Fires) because they had 7 council divisions. They were Mdewakantons, Wahpekutes, Wahpetons, Sissetons, Yanktons, Yanktonais, and the Tentons....   [tags: Social Issues, Anthropology, History] 326 words
(0.9 pages)
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Lakota Indians - Lakota History Throughout North American expansion the Lakota people have suffered some of the worst and straight forward persecutions against Native American Indians, and live in some of the poorest if not the poorest conditions in the United States. This is sad for a people who use to be one of the strongest nations in the Central Plains, feared by white men and other Indian nations alike for their ferocity and warrior abilities in the heat of battle. The Lakota arrived at positions of dominance because of their success in controlling live¬stock, land, trading rights, and people....   [tags: Native American Indian History] 1587 words
(4.5 pages)
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Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears - Cherokee Native American Indians and the Trail of Tears What made the Cherokee culture distinctive towards others in the Trail of Tears time period was that they had a more peaceful, harmless outlook on the situation. In 1814, Andrew Jackson who would eventually become the President of the United States, had his and his whole army’s lives on the line in the Battle of Horseshoe Bend to the British forces when the Cherokee allied with them to win the battle. Surprisingly, 16 years later when Jackson was President of the United States, he made the deciding decision on the controversy of whether or not the Cherokee deserved their land....   [tags: the trail of loss and adversity]
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1243 words
(3.6 pages)
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Stripped of Personal Freedom: Native Americans in the West - Throughout our country’s history there have been several groups who have fared less that great. Every minority group was treated unfairly, Indians were uprooted and had no control, I can’t imagine for a second being a soldier in combat, women struggled for basic rights, and many people fell victim to the changing ways of our economy, losing their jobs and fighting to survive. It seems wrong to pick one group over another, as if to say some people who were treated horribly or who faced mounting obstacles didn’t actually have it as bad as another group....   [tags: American history, Indians, poverty, economy]
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904 words
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guarani indians - The Guarani is an indigenous group living in the eastern lowland area of South America, with a population of about 80,000. It is believed that the Guaranis originated in the area of the Amazon River, then started to move south and inland (www.hollowear.com). They now reside in Paraguay, Bolivia, Argentina, and Brazil and their language is spoken by nearly 4 million people. (www.bartleby.com). There currently are three main sub-divisions of the Guarani tribes. Those are the Mbya, the AvaGuarani, and the Pay Tavytera, although they seem very cultured, they carry many of the traditional cultural elements of the land around them (www.museobarbero.org)....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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2803 words
(8 pages)
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Cheyenne Indian Tribe - Who really are the Cheyenne Indians. According to historians, they were Indian people who became nomadic and moved to the Great Plains in the 18th century (Berkin 366). Another tribe, the Souix, developed the name of "people of a different language" for the Cheyenne. Some people said that the Cheyenne did not exist until the mid-1600s or at least this is when the earliest known records were found. They are one of the most famous and prominent Plains tribes, too. At first, this tribe moved from the Great Lakes region to the North Dakota area....   [tags: Native American Indians] 1678 words
(4.8 pages)
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Oppression of American Indians in Our Hearts Fell to the Ground - From the Sioux in the North, to the Tonkawa in the South, tribes filled North America when the Europeans first set foot on the soil that we now know as the United States. The relationship between the Native American tribes and the Europeans had its fair share of difficulties for the next thirty years. Faced with the threat of the westward movement, as well as the ruthless military treatment that came with it, the North Americans began their unjustified, inhumane battle for survival. The Europeans colonization of North America has forever changed the lives and cultures of the Native Americans....   [tags: American History] 1314 words
(3.8 pages)
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The Ghost Dance - The Ghost Dance All Indians must dance, everywhere, keep on dancing. Pretty soon in next spring Great Spirit come. He bring back all game of every kind…all dead Indians come back and live again. They all be strong just like young men, be young again. Old blind Indian see again and get young and have fine time. When Great Spirit comes this way, than all the Indians go to mountains, high up away from whites. Whites can't hurt Indians then. Then while Indians way up high, big flood like water and all white people die, get drowned....   [tags: Indians Indian Essays]
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1149 words
(3.3 pages)
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How Did The Environment Affect The Native American Indians With Particular Reference To The Woodlan - How Did The Environment Affect The Native American Indians With Particular Reference To The Woodland Indians. The environment hugely affected the Native American Indians in many different ways. This is because of the way in which the Indians used the environment and the surrounding land. The Indians were very close to nature, and so that meant that any changes in nature would be changes in the Indians. Land The Indians thought of land very differently to the white man. The land was sacred, there was no ownership, and it was created by the great spirit....   [tags: American America History] 1295 words
(3.7 pages)
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Stereotyping of the Native Americans in the 1820's and 1830's - Stereotyping of the Native Americans in the 1820's and 1830's For Americans moving west in the 1820's and 30's there was little firsthand knowledge of what the frontier would be like when they arrived. There was a lot of presumption about the Indians. Many felt, through the stories they heard and read, that they had sufficient information to know what the Indians would truly be like and how to respond to them. Unfortunately, as is described in James Fenimore Cooper's Leatherstocking Tales, white settlers stereotyped the Native Americans as savage, heartless beasts....   [tags: Western Indians Racism Essays]
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3089 words
(8.8 pages)
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The Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas - The Kickapoo Traditional Tribe of Texas The Kickapoo Indians are Algonkian-speaking Indians, related to the Sauk and Fox, who lived at the portage between the Fox and Wisconsin rivers, probably in present Columbia County, Wis., U.S., when first reported by Europeans in the late 17th century. The Kickapoo were known as formidable warriors whose raids took them over a wide territory, ranging as far as Georgia and Alabama to the southeast; Texas and Mexico to the southwest; and New York and Pennsylvania to the east....   [tags: Native Americans Indians Texas Essays] 4129 words
(11.8 pages)
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The Osage Nation - The United States of American is a country that was previously inhabited before the European Anglo-Saxons came across that Atlantic Ocean. It was a nation of independent people, multiple tribes in many places both those who made one place their home year round and others who traveled with the seasons. In the middle of this big island laid a land that belonged to the Osage tribe, and what a mighty tribe it was and still is. In the 17th century the original Osage tribe separated from the Sioux their language almost extinct belongs to the Siouan family, few Osage still speak this native language....   [tags: History of the Osage Indians]
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2127 words
(6.1 pages)
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Ted Kooser: Great Poet of the Great Plains - ... He has achieved the most difficult kind of originality. He has transformed the common idiom and experience into fresh and distinctive poetry” (Gioia). Overall, his poetry has been described as “brief, imagistic, and accessible” (Kennedy), an extremely difficult task to accomplish as he maintains the strength of his metaphors and similes.. Kooser’s style is defined by strong use of figurative language to give meaning to other language devices and the poem itself. Kooser’s works explore a wide variety of themes, but in many, the underlying idea of a need for the preservation of culture despite inevitable change is present....   [tags: american history, great plains, jefferson]
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800 words
(2.3 pages)
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The History of the Wisconsin Indians - The 1989-1991 Biennial Budget established a program that would support school districts’ efforts to give information about Wisconsin Indian history, culture, and tribal sovereignty. The exact year Act 31 took place was 1989 (information from Act 31 handout/lecture). I would like to teach at the high school level which is the grades nine through twelve. One course would be history. History is a very delicate topic when dealing with Wisconsin Native Americans. I would talk to the Native American students in my class, and I would ask them what they would be comfortable with me teaching....   [tags: Wisconsin Indians, Native Americans, USA, history,] 830 words
(2.4 pages)
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American Indians: Health Disparities Research - American Indians have had health disparities as result of unmet needs and historical traumatic experiences that have lasted over 500 hundred years.1(p99) Since first contact American Indians have been exposed to infectious disease and death2(p19), more importantly, a legacy of genocide, legislated forcible removal, reservation, termination, allotment, and assimilation3. This catastrophic history had led to generational historical traumas and contributes to the worst health in the United States.2 American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN) represent 0.9 percent of the United States population4(p3) or 1.9 million AI/AN of 566 federally recognized tribes/nations.5 American Indians/Alaska Native...   [tags: alaska natives, american indians, health] 1153 words
(3.3 pages)
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Ten Little Indians (And Then There Were None) by Agatha Christie - Ten Little Indians, published as And Then There Were None when it débuted in America brought a wonderful sense of mystery into the life of the American. Written by Agatha Christie, it was published in 1939 as a fiction murder mystery. The story is set on the coast of Devon, England during the thirties. Ten Little Indians is a classic murder mystery, which involves ten unsuspecting average people. While it seems that one of these people would be the main character, everyone is equally important in shaping the story....   [tags: Ten Little Indians]
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688 words
(2 pages)
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Navajo Indians See the Importance of Supporting their Families and Communities - The Navajo nation is the largest U.S Indian tribe. It has more than 250,000 people. They are located in Northern New Mexico, a portion of southern Utah, and part of northern Arizona. They first descended from the Apaches, who came from the Pueblos. Their native language is Athapaskan. “Navajo” came from the word navahu’u meaning “farm fields in the valley.” The Spanish chroniclers first referred to the Navajos as Apaches de Nabajo’ meaning Apaches who farm in the valley. Then the name was eventually shortened to the Navajo....   [tags: Native Americans, American Indians,] 609 words
(1.7 pages)
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Collision between the Authorities of the General and State Governments on Account of the Indians - It gives me pleasure to announce to Congress that the benevolent policy of the Government, steadily pursued for nearly thirty years, in relation to the removal of the Indians beyond the white settlements is approaching to a happy consummation. Two important tribes have accepted the provision made for their removal at the last session of Congress, and it is believed that their example will induce the remaining tribes also to seek the same obvious advantages. The consequences of a speedy removal will be important to the United States, to individual States, and to the Indians themselves....   [tags: tribes, indians, indian community] 686 words
(2 pages)
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Lasting Effects of European Colonization on Native American Indians. - Effects of Colonisation on North American Indians Since the Europeans set foot on North American soil in 1620,they have had a devastating effect on the native population. I will be discussing the long term effect of North American colonisation on the Native Americans, focusing on such issues as employment opportunities, the environment, culture and traditions, health, as well as social justice. I will begin with the important issue of employment opportunities. The unemployment rate for Native Americans is a staggering 49%....   [tags: native americans, indians, colonial america] 1035 words
(3 pages)
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The Saga of the Tigua Indians - The Saga of the Tigua Indians The Saga of the Tigua Indians is an amazing one. By all reasoning they should have been wiped out long ago. There quiet defiance to change, however, has carried them through. From the height of civilization to near extinction the Tigua have remained. They endure imprisonment by the Spanish, oppression and manipulation by everyone that followed. This is the story of a people thought to extinct, that are once again learning to survive. Early histories of the Tigua Indians are conflicting and largely untrue....   [tags: Tigua Indians Native Americans Essays]
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5041 words
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The Pawnee Tribe Established from the Great Plains - The Pawnee were one of the first few tribes to establish on the Great Plains. The Pawnee came up from their inherited home of Mississippi and east Texas, by the Gulf of Mexico. The Pawnee then established on the Republican, Platte, and Loup rivers, located in current day Nebraska. This area was great for living because it had an ample supply of prey, rich soil, and plenty of rivers/lakes for water. Being one of the few tribes on the Great Plains they had more than enough food and water, meaning that the Pawnee population would exceed 35,000 people....   [tags: rules, etiquettes, mississippi, texas]
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548 words
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Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians - Location and Description of the Algonkian Indians - Algonkian lived in Quebec and Ontario; starting from the Ottawa valley, beneath Hudson Bay and above lower Ontario - the areas in which they lived in were dense woodlands with trees, such as, birch and evergreen; and snow covered the land most of the year. Adaptation to the physical Environment Home - Algonkian homes were called Wigwam, there frames were built out of saplings of tall, young tree trunks which were tied together with narrow strips of bark or root fibers, to form a dome shape - the frame was covered with woven mats or barks, then was firmly tied to the frames - light birch bark were used as covers in the summer and heavy e...   [tags: Algonkians Indians Native Americans Essays] 1219 words
(3.5 pages)
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The Plains - The vivid memory of the plains never leaves me. I can return to this place at any moment. I close my eyes and take a deep breath. My lungs are filled with the clean and pure air, a welcome change from the thick hazy air of the outside world. I am alone with only my thoughts and emotions to keep me company. The summer breeze, warm upon my face is filled with the sweet smell of the tall billowing grass. Soft green hills surround me. I am not certain where they begin or where they end. Far into the distance I can see another farmhouse....   [tags: Descriptive Essay, Descriptive, Observation] 422 words
(1.2 pages)
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How American Indians Have Adapted their Culture Since Colonization - My essay will have an outlook of the history of the first Americans “Indians” and how they’ve adapted with their religion, subsistence strategy, social organization, and material culture. Over the years things have change in the history of Native Americans, prior to the reconstruction period, Native Americans knew who they were and what they lived for. Before the Europeans came and changed their living they one with nature and the land they’ve came to know. They believe that America was there’s and they lived free....   [tags: American Indians, Native Americans, Colonies] 964 words
(2.8 pages)
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Background on the Sioux Indian Culture - The three online movies I chose to learn more about the culture in which I chose to write about and depict the life and culture of the Sioux Indian, (both past and present) are all from YouTube, and are as follows: *500 Tribes, *Meet the Sioux Indians, Plains Indian Tribe, 1949, and *The Great Sioux Nation. The films portrayed the Sioux in an almost identical manor, and although each of the films ran from twenty-five minutes long, to an hour and a half, they covered the same amount of ground and produced the same information....   [tags: Native American Indian history]
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890 words
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Tepeticpac Indians and the Town of Tlaxcala - Tlaxcala... It has what you like was founded in 1591 by a group of thirty families of tlaxcaltec, originating in the header of Tepeticpac, Indians who – as part of the project of colonization of the frontier chichimeca - months ago had been settled in Mexquitic. At this stage Tlaxcala, or Tlaxcalilla, it received the name of the town of Nuestra Señora de los Remedios, settling in the current founders Plaza. Later, between June and July next year and to facilitate the founding of the people of San Luis, along with the town of Santiago was moved near the Tlaxcala interchangeably known as river or Santiago....   [tags: Mexican Indian History, San Luis Potosi] 976 words
(2.8 pages)
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Cultural Aspects of the Navajo Indians - Culture gives definition to a group of people’s way of life. Culture defines people; It is who the people are. The Navajo Indians are a group located in the southwestern part of the United States with a distinct culture. They originated there sometime between the year “1200 and 1500” (Craats 4). Unlike the beginning of their residence in the United States, different aspects of the culture have changed, but the Navajo people still remain a culturally rich group of people. To this day, their political organization, economy, social organization, and religious beliefs are the four major elements that make them who they are as a whole....   [tags: Native American, Culture, Indian tribe]
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2384 words
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The Otomi Indians and Montecillo - Montecillo... It has what you like a group of Otomi Indians around 1600 and tarascan avecindaron part of the ejidos in the East of the city of San Luis Potosí. The new settlement was small in size: only consisted of two leagues, measured in terms of the city towards the Cerro de San Pedro, and width less than a quarter of a League. The name of Montecillo, adopted from the outset by its inhabitants according to the titles of erection of the village, was derived from the fact that the lands they settled originally were rough, hilly and fruitless....   [tags: Mexican Indian History, San Luis Potosi] 1119 words
(3.2 pages)
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Yanomamo Indians - This paper looks on Yanomamo Indians traits and describes their actual way of life; the basic question that might be asked will be answered: who they are, where do they live, how do they gather food to survive and what are their skills in this domain; also how these Indians are organized politically and how are the social relations among the families and between neighboring tribes. Then, how the devastation of the scientists and journalists have changed the Yanomamo Indians way of life in the current and past century, and if they kept the same aspects of their current religion of they ancestors even thought modern world have reached them....   [tags: Yanomamo Indians Culture] 883 words
(2.5 pages)
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Review For The Woodlands Indians In The Western Great Lakes - The Woodlands Indians in the Western Great Lakes. Robert E. Ritzenthaler and Pat Ritzenthaler. Prosper Heights, IL: Waveland Press, Inc. 1993. 154 pp. In each of the ten chapters that comprise this book, the authors address important features of the Woodlands Indians’ way of life that ensure their survival. They address such important issues as how they are able to find enough food to subsist and what exactly they do eat to subsist; as well as going into topics such as their religious beliefs, traditional ceremonies, their beliefs regarding shamanism and curative techniques, their material culture, games, music, and folklore that is important to them and influences who they are as a people....   [tags: Indians Book Review] 1520 words
(4.3 pages)
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Cherokee Indians - Cherokee Indians The Cherokee Indians were one of the civilized tribes in the United States. They were located in the southeastern part of the U.S. This includes the western parts of North and South Carolina, The northern parts of Alabama and Georgia, Southwest Virginia and the Cumberland basin of Tennessee. It appears the Cherokee settled in 1000 A.D. to 1500 A.D. Their development took place in two stages or phases. The Pisgah which took place 1300 A.D. to 1540 A.D. and the Qualla which took place 1540 A.D....   [tags: History Indians Native Americans Essays]
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2181 words
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The Plains Bison Hunt - Introduction The Red River Métis began their organised bison hunts soon after 1820 (Gerhard, 1982). The hunts did not take long to become a major part of the Métis culture and heritage. This would end up being a major source of income for many decades. As the ice age glaciers started to melt, the bison and other animals started moving onto the plains, the Métis then used this migration to their advantage and started hunting them (Gerhard, 1982). Some First Nations, particularly the Dakota and Assiniboine, relied primarily on the bison, utilizing every part of the body and carcass (Gerhard, 1982)....   [tags: Ecology]
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A Southwestern Indian Culture Among Us Today: The Hopi Indians - A Southwestern Indian Culture Among Us Today: The Hopi Indians Did you know that the Ancient Indian people of the Southwestern United States have dated back to the year 10,000 BC. First appearing toward the end of the last Ice Age, they were the first “Americans.” (Noble, 1998) When Christopher Columbus arrived in the America’s in 1492 and seeing the people of this land for the first time, he thought that he had landed in India, thus giving them the name “Indians.” (Noble, 1998) However, he was nowhere near India, or that region of the world....   [tags: Hopi Indians southwestern united states] 1993 words
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Health Care is One Of The Largest Issues Facing American Indians Today - One of the largest issues facing American Indian's today One of the largest issues facing American Indian's today One of the largest issues facing the American Indian's today is that health care. As tribes and urban Indian health centers struggle along with the rest of the country to address the growing numbers of Elders in their communities. There are key issues and special considerations that must be addressed to ensure American Indian Elders are not forgotten in any proposed reform or redesign proposals that the newly formed Medicaid Commission or Congress put forth....   [tags: Native American Indians] 1151 words
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Reintroducing Bison Restores the Great Plains Ecosystem - Reintroducing Bison Restores the Great Plains Ecosystem Great Plains history The Great Plains offer a familiar story of overexploitation and the emergence of the need to fix the damage. Today rural areas are showing the decline of traditional agriculture and extractive land uses that have left the area barren and unproductive. Restoration projects, in particular those involving the reintroduction of the bison, give an example of bringing the native ecosystem of an area back to life. Grasslands once covered 40% of our nation, the bison once ranged over 48 of our states....   [tags: Environment Animals Nature Ecology Essays]
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Canada´s Mixedwood Plains and Pollution - ... The great lakes is one of the most vast resources of freshwater in the world and it was being heavily polluted until people began to realize that it was necessary to preserve the lakes for our good, as well as the animals who used the water and surrounding resources for a habitat. Factories and companies that manufacture goods are affecting a deteriorating ecosystem. More than 24 billion gallons of untreated sewage waste and storm water are pumped into the lakes annually. Pollution is increasing as well, due to the cottage development, where people enjoy spending their summers relaxing....   [tags: ecozone, popluation, lakes, solutions]
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Laurence M. Hauptman's Between Two Fires: American Indians in the Civil War - The American Civil War tore apart many American lives. These people lost loved ones, had to endure the pains of those who lost limbs, and deal with emotional needs. However American lives were not the only ones that suffered and fought the war. American Indians served for both the North and the South during the Civil War. There reasons was to what they could gain from the side the chose, pride for the land they lived in, and to Indians did not have much going for them at the time. From generals to privets they stood there ground and fought with pride....   [tags: American Citil War Indians Native Americans] 1539 words
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Western Indians - In the late nineteenth century the expansion to the west increased the American culture. Since population was growing they needed to satisfy demands equally for every person. The idea of Manifest Destiny was used as a justification for the expansion and westward movement. Natives Americans were against the thought Americans had about the West. As a result Americans put a number of policies that helped remove the Natives Americans of the West. Americans were trying to destroy the culture Natives had....   [tags: Native American Indian History] 913 words
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The Hudson Plains on Canada - LOCATION The Hudson plains are in parts of Ontario and Manitoba. Their area is about 350 000 km squared. The west edge of the Hudson Plains is around Churchill in north Manitoba, the eastern edge is around Fort Rupert, the northern edge borders Hudson Bay and James Bay and the southern edge is near Kapuskasing, Manitoba. Moosonee and Churchill are major cities in the Hudson Plains area, and lesser known cities include Attawapiskat, Fort George, Eastmain, Fort Albany, Lake River, Winisk, Fort Severn, and Shamattawa....   [tags: essays research papers] 929 words
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Battle of a Continent: the Plains of Abraham - In the early 18th century, New France prospered in terms of population and agricultural production. After the Treaty of Utrecht in 1713 which ended the War of the Spanish Succession, France was poised to make a decision at the bargaining table with the victor's of Britain. The contents of the cease fire also included the relinquishment of lands and France, who lost the war considerably, gave up Acadia and Île Ste. Jean only to keep the far eastern port of Louisbourg (Wikipedia, 2004). The habitant of New France heard of this and remained incognito for the moment, only to wait and see what Britain would do next....   [tags: European History] 1384 words
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American Indians - The American Indians Between 1609 To 1865 The Native Americans or American Indians, once occupied all of the entire region of the United States. They were composed of many different groups, who speaked hundreds of languages and dialects. The Indians from the Southwest used to live in large built terraced communities and their way of sustain was from the agriculture where they planted squash, pumpkins, beans and corn crops. Trades between neighboring tribes were common, this brought in additional goods and also some raw materials such as gems, cooper....   [tags: essays research papers Native American Indian] 1645 words
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The American Indians - Subculture Assignment The American Indians are also known as Native Americans who are present within the United States and comprise varying ethnic groups and tribes and hold distinctive attributes which makes them different from the white Americans who are present in the society of the United States. The immigration to the US started from the 15th century due to which the society of the United States was seen to be holding distinctive tribes and immigrants who formed groups in the US and started achieving recognition in the US society....   [tags: Native Americans, Ethnic Groups. Tribes]
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The Tapirapé Indians - In South America, there are many indigenous groups that have been studied and analyzed by anthropologists. The Tapirapé Indians is an indigenous Brazilian tribe that has a very interesting culture that has been influenced by other indigenous groups in Brazil, while being preserved from Europeans influences. Most ethnographic research about the Tapirapé Indians has been performed by Herbert Baldus and Charles Wagley from the early 1900’s to the 1970’s. In this paper, I will analyze the language, power, social relations, material practices, belief system and institutions and rituals of the Tapirapé Indians and discuss how each category plays a role in their culture....   [tags: Culture]
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Unfortunate Farmers in the Great Plains during the 1930's - The young, recently married farmers living in the Great Plains during the 1930s had a terrible life. First off, being married meant having multiple people to provide for. This is more responsibility, and leads to dividing up the food between family members. Then, the country was also in an economic downturn, so the price of food and crops were low. Farmers already had debt because of new machines and land that was purchased during World War I to keep up with the demand during the war. Then the depression caused banks to fail, so farmers lost all their money that was in the bank....   [tags: the Great Depression] 726 words
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History of the Mandan Indian Tribe - The Mandan are an indigenous tribe native to North America. The Mandan’s are known for being one of the earliest tribes to live on the great plains of the Midwest. Unlike other plains Indians the Mandan were a settled tribe who lived along the Big Bend of the Missouri River in what is now called North Dakota. While most tribes that lived in the plains were hunter/gatherers who lived a nomadic lifestyle following their food, the Mandan were planters living mostly off their crops. Warriors left once a year in hunting groups to go out into the plains in search for Buffalo, which was not only their major meat source, but was also used for clothing and shelter as well....   [tags: American History, native americans] 2521 words
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Cherokee Indian Marriages - Although there are several beliefs on how the Cherokee first arrived historical evidence shows they inhabited southeastern North American between A.D. 1000 and 1500 (Boudinot, 1829). Elias (1829) found The Trail of Tears to be “the best known episode in history as well as the worst,” for this devastating event forced relocation of the Indians from their home land in the southeast to a new unfamiliar land in Oklahoma. Thousands of Indians were forced from their homes with no warning and directed to march in the middle of winter to Oklahoma (Boudinot, 1829)....   [tags: American Indians]
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The History of the Navajo Indians - The Navajo Indians used to live in northwestern Canada and Alaska. 1,000 years ago the Navajo Indians traveled south, because there was more qualities they had seeked there. When the Navajo Indians traveled south there was a lot of oil in the 1940’s. Today the Navajo Indians are located in the Four Corners. The marriage practices for the Navajo Indians are very unique. The bride must be bought with horses, sheep, or other valuable items. What many Navajo Indians used to use in the 40’s were love potions....   [tags: Native Americans, informative] 575 words
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Deontology in Jim and the Indians - Jim has found himself in a quandary. When arriving in a South American town he has happened upon a captain and his army about to assassinate twenty Indians in order to deter other Indians protesting against the government. Jim is treated as a guest to the town and offered the privilege of shooting one of the Indians in which case the captain will let the other nineteen go, however declining this offer will mean the captain will carry on as planned and kill all twenty. Consequentialism is ordinarily distinct from deontology, as deontology offers rightness or wrongness of an act, rather than the outcome of the action....   [tags: rules, consequentialism, good will] 891 words
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The Conquering of the Karankawa Indians - The Karankawa Indians lived along the Gulf of Mexico in the coastal bend. Their territory ranged from the west end of Galveston bay southwestward to Corpus Christi bay. Contrary to popular belief the Karankawa were not cannibals. They did like many other Texas Indian tribes eat their captured enemy warriors and leaders to gain their strength or courage but never for food. The name Karankawa was given to many bands of Indians in the area including the Cocos, Copanes, Cujanes, Guapites, Carancaguases (the source of the name Karankawa)....   [tags: Gulf of Mexico Naive-Americans] 1115 words
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Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians - History of Cherokee Indians in the United States In the early nineteenth century, while the United States expanded into the lower south, white settlers faced a difficulty. That colony was already home for the Indians, and most Americans thought Cherokees were getting into their way of development. Even though the land was the Indian’s way of life, Americans decided to evacuate them. When Andrew Jackson took office, he pursued the Indian removal policy. Under his administration no less than ninety four treaties were made with the Indians, but the United States began moving them westward....   [tags: Native American history in the US] 1473 words
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Conflicts Between Colonists and Indians - In many situations, introducing a new party into a land that was formerly inhabited and assimilated by another party with completely different societal, political and cultural values results in a lengthy period of transition and conflict due to misunderstanding. Colonization and the interactions between colonists and Indians during the early stages of settlement in the New World was certainly no exception. Although European societies and political structures were hierarchical and left less to the impoverished members of society, Indian societies and political structures were not as patriarchal and featured communal cooperation....   [tags: Communication, Cooperation, Disease] 1394 words
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Dogs, Ferrets, and Toads in the Wyoming Plains - Dogs, Ferrets, and Toads in the Wyoming Plains This report is about three species that inhabit the Wyoming plains. One of these species is the black tailed prairie dog which inhabits nearly all of the U.S. and was at one time considered to be endangered. The second is the black footed ferret which was thought to be extinct until a small colony of these little predators was discovered on a ranch near Meeteetse Wyoming. The third and final animal mentioned in this report is the Wyoming toad. These toads are becoming increasingly scarce in the wild....   [tags: Species Animals Environment Essays Papers]
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Nitrogen and Irrigation on Coastal Plains Soils - Nitrogen and Irrigation on Coastal Plains Soils So why is it important to look at nitrogen in soils. First of all, it is a key element in organic molecules, so it is key to plant growth (Singer and Munns). Nitrogen is useful to plants in the form of nitrate because plants can take in nitrate and form organic molecules (Singer and Munns, 193). However, in soils, nitrogen in the form of nitrate (NO3) is considered a "mobile nutrient" which means that it can move easily through the soil to supply the needs of a plant (Singer and Munns, 221)....   [tags: Agricultural Agriculture Farming Essays]
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Apache Indians - Apache Prisoners of War The Chiricahuas, who were once one of the most feared Native American tribes of the southwest, became prisoners of war by the United States for a period of twenty seven years. This period of time was the longest captivity a Native American tribe had ever been imprisoned. The Chiricahuas imprisonment began in 1886, when the United States Army transported four hundred Native Americans from San Carlos and Fort Apache reservations to army posts in Florida (Davis). By 1887, the bulk of the Chiricahuas had been transported to the Mount Vernon barracks in Alabama, and the rest of the dislocated band of Chiricahuas, including the now famous Geronimo were reunited by 1888 (Da...   [tags: Native American Indians] 1423 words
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Indian Cultural Revival In A Eurocentric World - ... Therefore, this is why King has Monroe use a modern method to “bring back” the buffalo to the reserve. After seeing the sculptures, Tecumseh notes, “It’s a buffalo. Or at least, it’s the outline of a buffalo. Flat iron wire bent into the shape of a buffalo” (130). By using cast iron, a material that has long been used in Europe by blacksmiths, and also serving as an example of the technological and cultural imposition of European settlers, Monroe is making the buffalo reappear on the plains....   [tags: iron, buildings, art] 900 words
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American Indians and Alaska Natives - The United States population growth rate continues to increase gradually by less than 1% per year. Over the past decade, American Indians and Alaska Natives (AIANs) population increased by 26.7%.1 According to 2010 census, there are approximately 5.2 million AIANs living in the United States representing 1.7% of the U.S. population.2 By 2050, the projected population of AIANs will reach an estimated 8.6 million.2 Alaska Natives (AN) comprise of the second largest population group in Alaska. They make up a bigger percentage of Alaska’s population than Native Americans in any other state....   [tags: population growth, alaska, natives]
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Lakota (Sioux) Indians and Creation - ... Finally a young man decided to see what Iktomi was about, and came up. His name was Tokahe, and is now called the First. Tokahe was shown the wonders of the top soil by Iktomi and he then decided to bring his people up with him. He was telling them of the great things he had seen, but an Elder warned him of the danger. Tokahe was still determined to bring his people up, and so the Elder went out of the hole before the others and became the Buffalo Nation, to protect the people when danger arose....   [tags: Native American beliefs]
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American Indians - American Indians form one of the minorities groups in America. Yet their native soil has the leading population in the world. America was inclined by their viewpoint before the first settler. Many of the Indians came to America as early as the turn of the century, in which they were deprived of residency until a congressional act was approved in 1946(Lee 106). Most Indians have supplied abundant assistance to the culture and flawless being of US; majorities of these donations regulate to the science field....   [tags: Native Americans, American History] 895 words
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Indians and the Frontier - Indians and the Frontier The frontier after the Civil War was changed just like the rest of America. Immigrants flocked here from all over the globe. This led to huge population increases, which meant that more land was to be used. The frontier was slowly divided among the masses, and people began claiming their stakes. With the land being devoured, the Indians felt that they were being denied the rights to what was theirs. The Indians were greatly outnumbered, and out skilled. In one of the last deciding battles, Wounded Knee, the Indians lost one-hundred and forty-six dead, and fifty-one injured, where as the U.S....   [tags: Papers] 482 words
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North American Indians - As the first ethnographer of Indian culture, George Catlin plays a vital role by offering the western eye a glimpse into the “uncivilized” North American Indian culture—both pictorially and textually. Following the Lewis and Clark expedition, Catlin took it upon himself to set out and paint prominent Indian leaders in their traditional attire, as well as to document his experiences through a series of letters. Catlin’s work, North American Indians, stands out as a valuable time capsule for the modern reader....   [tags: Ethnology, Catlin] 633 words
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American Indians and World War II - By 1940, Native Americans had experienced many changes and counter-changes in their legal status in the United States. Over the course of the nineteenth century, most tribes lost part or all of their ancestral lands and were forced to live on reservations. Following the American Civil War, the federal government abrogated most of the tribes’ remaining sovereignty and required communal lands to be allotted to individuals. The twentieth century also saw great changes for Native Americans, such as the Citizenship Act and the Indian New Deal....   [tags: American History, World History]
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Indian Removal Policy of 1830 - President Andrew Jackson wanted the white settlers from the south to expand owning land from Five Indian tribes, which was called Indian Removal Policy (McNamara). The Five Indian tribes that were affected were Choctaws, Muskogee, Chickasaws, Cherokees, and the Seminoles. In the 1830, the Removal Act went into effect. The Removal Act gave President Andrew Jackson the power to remove Indian tribes living east of the Mississippi river by a negotiate removal treaties (James). The treaties, made the Indians give up their land for exchange of land in the west (James)....   [tags: removal act, trail of tears, indians]
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Attempts to Spread Christianity to the Pueblo Indians - ... They were not a closed minded people, saying my way or no way, instead they were open to listening to the views of others. They would attend the Spanish masses and other church services; as a result the Spanish took it as a sign of their willing acceptance to Catholicism. However they had no intention of letting Christianity completely take the place of their own traditional religion. They we’re willing to add Christian components to their own religion, but not replace theirs with Christianity....   [tags: religion, covert, spanish] 554 words
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