Search Results pity

Free Essays Unrated Essays Better Essays Stronger Essays Powerful Essays Term Papers Research Papers

Your search returned over 400 essays for "pity"
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [Next >>]

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.
Title Length Color Rating  
Tis Pity She's A Whore by John Ford - "Tis Pity She's A Whore" by John Ford In this play it would be impossible to accurately assess this idea commenting on Annabella and Giovanni as a single entity. They are extremely different characters with their only common ground being the love they have for each other, and even this is expressed in distinctly different ways with subsequently different consequences. These consequences build up to the conclusion referred to in the question, and so it would also prove hard to answer it directly without having previously discussed what has come before and created such conclusion....   [tags: John Ford Tis Pity Whore Essays] 2352 words
(6.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Pity in The Crucible by Arthur Miller - The Crucible – Pity It's shocking how people die for no reason. It was happening in Salem in 1692 for the witch trials. Rebecca Nurse was a woman with good reputation, and because of spectral evidence she was sentenced with death. The only way to escape from death was to accept that she was a witch. This is still happening now. Osama Bin Laden was the reason for 7000 people's death in New York. We have to look at the society of Salem and pity them because of the repressions that made order and freedom imbalanced, as we are going to be pitied some day....   [tags: Crucible Essays] 1289 words
(3.7 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Whether or Not Macbeth is Deserving of Pity in Shakespeare's Play Macbeth - In the last scene of “Macbeth”, Malcolm describes Macbeth as “this dead butcher” which could be argued is the best way to sum up Macbeth’s character. The word “butcher” implies slaughter and brutality. Macbeth is certainly guilty of butchery, the cruel, senseless killing of people. Malcolm uses the word “butcher” to provoke appalling memories of Macbeth’s deeds from the audience. But could Macbeth’s behavior ever be justified. Could Macbeth ever be pitied or even excused for the actions he took....   [tags: Analytical Essay, Term Paper] 4256 words
(12.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Wilfred Owen and his Pity of War - Wilfred Owen Wished and his Pity of War Through His Poetry Wilfred Owen Wished to Convey, to the General Public, the Pity of War. In a Detailed Examination of these Poems, With Reference to Others, Show the Different in which He achieved this Wilfred Owen fought in the war as an officer in the Battle of the Somme. He entered the war in January of 1917. However he was hospitalised for war neurosis and was sent for rehabilitation at Craiglockhart War Hospital in Edinburgh that May. At Craiglockhart he met Siegfried Sassoon, a poet and novelist whose grim antiwar works were in harmony with Wilfred Owen's concerns....   [tags: Wilfred Owen Poems Poetry War Literature Essays] 3001 words
(8.6 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Wilfred Owen's Poetry and Pity of War - Wilfred Owen's Poetry and Pity of War Through his poetry Wilfred Owen wished to convey, to the general public, the PITY of war. In a detailed examination of three poems, with references to others, show the different ways in which he achieved this Wilfred Owen was born in Oswestry, 18th March 1893. He was working in France when the war began, tutoring a prominent French family. When the war started he began serving in the Manchester Regiment at Milford Camp as a Lieutenant. He fought on the Western Front for six months in 1917, and was then diagnosed with War Neurosis (shell shock)....   [tags: Wilfred Owen War Poems Essays] 3681 words
(10.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Pity of War in Dulce et Decom Est and The Last Night - Dulce et Decorum Est and The Last Night both convey the bittersweet pity of war in two very different, yet simultaneously similar ways. The way that these pieces of literature operate is starkly contrasting, and to some extent, reflects upon the nature and intent with which they were written. For example, in Dulce et Decorum Est, Owen was writing to protest against the atrocious conditions to which “children ardent for some desperate glory” were being sent to, and for this, he used extremely graphic and striking imagery to evoke emotions of disgust and repulsion into the reader, which would hopefully bring them to understand and appreciate Owen’s viewpoint....   [tags: Jessie Pope, compare, contrast, Wilfred Owen] 1220 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Pity the Bear in Judith Minty's story, Killing the Bear - Pity the Bear in Judith Minty's story, Killing the Bear  Judith Minty's story, "Killing the Bear," is a rather chilling tale about a woman who shoots a bear to death. The story is not merely a simple account of the incident however. It is full of stories and facts about bears, which affect how the reader reacts to the story. In the beginning, the reader expects the bear to be portrayed as a cold-blooded monster who must be killed for the safety of the primary character however this expectation is foiled throughout the story and the reader sees the bear in a very different light....   [tags: Minty Killing the Bear Essays] 846 words
(2.4 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
How Owen Vividly Expresses The Pity Of War In Disabled - How Owen Vividly Expresses The Pity Of War In Disabled The first line of the poem starts by saying: He sat in a wheeled chair, waiting for dark, Owen uses the idea of a man who is disabled as a way of making people sympathize with him because he was not as able as most people. The way in which he was situated in the dark makes the sentence ambiguous, showing it could literally stand for the condition of the light or that the man is alone and helpless. The writer then further made the point of the man being disabled; "Legless, sewn short at elbow." This portrays an image of a defenceless man....   [tags: Papers] 749 words
(2.1 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Comparing Mood and Atmosphere of The Pity of Love, Broken Dreams, and The Fisherman - Mood and Atmosphere of The Pity of Love, Broken Dreams, and The Fisherman The Pity of Love is a short, relatively simple poem, yet it still manages to create a feeling of anxiousness, of desperate worry. Yeats achieves this in only eight lines of average length by extremely careful and precise use of language and structure. The poem begins with the line "A pity beyond all telling•, immediately setting the general tone and basic point of the piece, elevating his despair to its highest levels and plunging the poem into the depths of depression and failure; before it has barely begun, Yeats is already admitting defeat, after a fashion, claiming that this pity is so terrible he is unable to properly describe it....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays] 1107 words
(3.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
The Horror of Pity and War in Regeneration by Pat Barker and Collective Poems of Wilfred Owen - The Horror of Pity and War in Regeneration by Pat Barker and Collective Poems of Wilfred Owen Through reading ‘Regeneration’ by Pat Barker and Wilfred Owen’s collection of poems, we see both writers present the horror and pity of World War I in an effective way. ‘Regeneration’ shows us a personal account of shell-shocked officer’s experience in the war. This links with Wilfred Owen’s poems as they too show how war affects the soldiers. Even though ‘Regeneration’ (a prose piece) and Wilfred Owen’s poems (poetry) are similar, they both present different styles as they are written at different times, a male and female perspective and in different literacy forms....   [tags: Papers] 2135 words
(6.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Queen Elizabeth and Annabella in Tis Pity She's a Whore by John Ford - Queen Elizabeth and Annabella in "Tis Pity She's a Whore" by John Ford Annabella, the female protagonist in John Ford’s play, ‘Tis Pity She’s a Whore, ultimately dies after trying to meet the conflicting demands that her brother and father place on her. While her brother, Giovanni, commands her to be his clandestine lover, her father, Florio, expects her to marry a socially appropriate man and bear a child. These demands closely resemble the real-life demands that Queen Elizabeth I’s subjects placed on her because they simultaneously wanted her to fulfill their erotic desires, marry a politically appropriate man, and produce an heir to the throne....   [tags: Annabella Elizabeth Compare Contrast Essays]
:: 8 Works Cited
2601 words
(7.4 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Transformation: Then and Now - ... His love isn’t specific to any type and by making this comparison, he suggests that all men should be the same way; that they should love one another unconditionally. When Blake says that peace is the human dress, he seems to be suggesting that peace is something you can choose to have; just as you can choose what you wear. This enforces the idea that peace is not just an occurrence but, more so, the result of an action or decision. Through these personifications Blake gives mercy, pity, peace, and love a human like quality that defines how he believes people should act and at the same describes how God acts....   [tags: Literature] 2192 words
(6.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Jean-Jacques Rousseau and The Essence of Human Nature - ... This is true because man is free. Rousseau starts by “stripping this being, so constituted, of all the supernatural gifts he may have received, and of all the artificial faculties he could only have acquired by prolonged progress” (134). Man in his beginning is unsophisticated and irrational nothing more than “an animal “(134). But, in nature man has no authorities. In nature “men, dispersed among them [other animals], observe, imitate their industry, and so raise themselves to the level of the Beasts’ instinct, with this advantage that each species has but its own instinct, while man perhaps having none that belong to him, appropriates them all, feeds indifferently on most of the various foods” (134-135)....   [tags: Jean-Jacques Rousseau]
:: 1 Works Cited
1435 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Rousseau - ... This is true because man is free. Rousseau starts by “stripping this being, so constituted, of all the supernatural gifts he may have received, and of all the artificial faculties he could only have acquired by prolonged progress” (134). Man in his beginning is unsophisticated and irrational nothing more than “an animal “(134). But, in nature man has no authorities. In nature “men, dispersed among them [other animals], observe, imitate their industry, and so raise themselves to the level of the Beasts’ instinct, with this advantage that each species has but its own instinct, while man perhaps having none that belong to him, appropriates them all, feeds indifferently on most of the various foods” (134-135)....   [tags: Psychology] 1753 words
(5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Macbeth: Tragedy - According to the classical view, tragedy should arouse feelings of pity and fear in the audience. Does macbeth do this. Shakespeare’s Macbeth is definitely a tragedy in the sense that it arouses feelings of pity and fear in the audience. Macbeth is a weak minded man who, if sees an opportunity for power follows his ambitions and takes it, even if this is not the rightful thing to do. He is easily persuaded and suffers great guilt. Macbeth the character on his own creates the feeling of pity and fear in the audience....   [tags: essays research papers] 906 words
(2.6 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Elements of Aristotelian Tragedy Depicted in Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet - An Aristotelian tragedy includes many different characteristics. It is a cause-and-effect chain and it contains the elements of catharsis, which is pity and fear, and hamartia, which is the tragic flaw embedded in the main characters. The famous play Romeo and Juliet, written by William Shakespeare, is about two lovers of two different families who hate each other and the misdemeanors they have to surpass. Many debate on whether it is an Aristotelian tragedy or simply tragic. Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet should be regarded as an Aristotelian tragedy because catharsis is exhibited in the play, Juliet’s blindness of love is shown, and Romeo’s impetuousness is the tragic flaw that leads to his demise....   [tags: romeo and juliet]
:: 4 Works Cited
1671 words
(4.8 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Old Verities and Truths of the Heart in Writing - Old Verities and Truths of the Heart in Writing In his Novel Prize Address, Faulkner states that an author must leave "no room in his workshop for anything but the old verities and truths of the heart...love and honor and pity and pride and compassion and sacrifice." He accuses his younger contemporaries of ignoring these noble spiritual pillars while pondering the atomic doom of mankind with questions like, "When will I be blown up?" Such physical fears, far from conflicts of the heart, are what plague his bomb-obsessed contemporaries....   [tags: Writing Authors Faulkner Essays] 1303 words
(3.7 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Mary Shelley's Presentation of the Creature - For a modern reader, the creature evokes pity in the end rather than fear. How do you respond to Mary Shelley’s presentation of the creature. Mary Shelley’s presentation that ‘the creature evokes pity in the end rather than fear’ is a view that is shared by many readers, including myself. Although naturally, many people would not agree with her presentation as everyone has a different perspective on the novel’s events, and everyone will have their own personal view on what feelings and emotions the creature evokes....   [tags: English Literature] 1174 words
(3.4 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Oedipus and Othello - We as humans repress certain emotion to help us forget about a tragic event. In psychology catharsis is a form of technique that is used to relieve any type of anxiety by bringing repressed feelings and fears to consciousness. In tragic plays catharsis is the emotion that makes the audience feel pity, fear, and a sense of relief instead of hopelessness in the end of the play. In the tragedies Oedipus the king by Sophocles and Othello the moor of Venice by Shakespeare we feel these same emotions towards Oedipus and Othello....   [tags: Shakespearean Literature] 583 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Robert Rossen’s 1961 Film, The Hustler: Can it be Viewed as an Aristotelian Tragedy? - Robert Rossen’s 1961 film, The Hustler, is one that is said to aspire to be classified as a tragedy. But can the film be compared to something such as tragedy in the views of Aristotle. Does the film fit the requirements prerequisite of an Aristotelian Tragedy. Or are the comparisons the result of ignorant, unenlightened critics. Aristotle thought up a list of compulsory requirements for something to be called ‘tragedy’. He concluded “Tragedy affects through pity and fear the catharsis of such emotions.” meaning that during a tragedy, one should feel the emotions of pity and fear--fear that the circumstances which they are observing could one day affect themselves--but that after the spectacle had ended, one would leave feeling ‘lifted up’, as if they had purged themselves of those emotions....   [tags: aristotle, movies, philosophy] 980 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Macbeth - Tragedy - According to the classical view, tragedy should arouse feelings of pity and fear in the audience. Does Macbeth do this. Tragedy has most definitely influenced the viewer’s thoughts on Macbeth within this play. In Shakespeare’s Macbeth, the audience sees a gradual breakdown in the character of Macbeth himself, due to the tragic events that unfold during the play. This has a direct effect on the audience’s views and thoughts of Macbeth, thus creating pity and fear within the audience. Macbeth, being a man and a human being himself, is in-clined to some forms of temptation, to which man himself has quite often succumbed....   [tags: essays research papers] 1308 words
(3.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Macbeth, Aristotilean Tragedy? - According to Aristotle, there are certain rules which make a tragedy what it is. After discussing the rules of an Aristotelian tragedy, we will try to learn whether Shakespeare's Macbeth is classified as such. We will find that although Macbeth is considered a tragedy among many people, it does not meet the requirements of an Aristotelian tragedy. Aristotle's definition of a tragedy consists of several points. "A tragedy, then is the imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself; in language with pleasurable accessories, each kind brought in separately in the parts of the work; in a dramatic, not in a narrative form; with incidents arousing pity and fear, where-with to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions." (Introduction to Aristotle p 631) Aristotle also claims that a tragedy must have six parts, in order of importance: plot, character, thought, diction, melody, and spectacle....   [tags: World Literature] 1043 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry by Mildred D. Taylor - "Roll of Thunder Hear My Cry" by Mildred D. Taylor What do you think about TJ Avery in this novel do you hate him for his bad deeds or pity him. TJ is quite a confusing character. On one I had I pity him because of all the misfortune in his life, through his own fault though. Although on the other hand I think he is a complacent character, who thinks the world solely revolves around him. He seems to feel that the world owes him a living, a living he is not prepared to work for. I pity TJ because he has never really had any discipline and although discipline can be harsh....   [tags: Roll Thunder Hear Cry Mildred Taylor Essays] 409 words
(1.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Sympathy for Oedipus in the Oedipus Tyrannus - Sympathy for Oedipus in the Oedipus Tyrannus       The aim of tragedy is to evoke fear and pity, according to Aristotle, who cited the Oedipus Tyrannus as the definitive tragic play. Thus pity must be produced from the play at some point. However, this does not necessarily mean that Oedipus must be pitied. We feel great sympathy ('pathos') for Jocasta's suicide and the fate of Oedipus' daughters. Oedipus could evoke fear in us, not pity. He is a King of an accursed city willing to use desperate methods, even torture to extract truth from the Shepherd....   [tags: Oedipus Tyrannus Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
2239 words
(6.4 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
A Case Study of One Student’s Approach to Reading The Divine Image - A Case Study of One Student’s Approach to Reading The Divine Image Hypothesis When Marielle, an English 2 student, was given a series of critical thinking tasks, her first response to the poem, “The Divine Image,” by William Blake changed as she followed the direction of each task and built on her previous understanding of the poem. I describe her responses to the eight learning paper tasks and her dissection of the poem for hidden meanings. The Tasks and Various Interpretations For each learning paper, Marielle was given eight different ways to interpret “The Divine Image,” by William Blake....   [tags: William Blake Divine Image Poem Papers] 1834 words
(5.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Sophocles' Antigone - The Real Tragedy - Tragedy of Antigone The play “Antigone” by Sophocles displays many qualities that make it a great tragedy.  A tragedy is defined as a dramatic or literary work in which the principal character engages in a morally significant struggle ending in ruin or profound disappointment. In creating his tragedy “Antigone”, Sophocles uses many techniques to create the feelings of fear and pity in his readers. This in turn creates an excellent tragedy.       In order for a play to be considered a tragedy it must achieve the purgation of fear and pity.  In the play “Antigone”, Sophocles does a great job of bringing out these two emotions in a reader....   [tags: Antigone essays] 605 words
(1.7 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
traglear King Lear as an Arthur Miller Tragedy - King Lear as an Arthur Miller Tragedy        If we seek to justify Shakespeare's King Lear as a tragedy by applying Arthur Miller's theory of tragedy and the tragic hero, then we might find Lear is not a great tragedy, and the character Lear is hardly passable for a tragic hero. However, if we take Aristotle's theory of tragedy to examine this play, it would fit much more neatly and easily. This is not because Aristotle prescribes using nobility for the subject of a tragedy, but, more importantly, because he emphasizes the purpose of tragedy -- to arouse pity and fear in the audience, and thus purge them of such emotions....   [tags: King Lear essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1204 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Oedipus as a Tragic Hero - Tragedies have been written, told, and acted out for a number of years. Aristotle defined in his book, Poetics that a tragedy is to arouse the emotions of pity, fear, and finally a catharsis, or purging of emotions. A tragic play that perfectly completes this cycle of emotions is Oedipus the King by Sophocles. This play follows a king of the town of Thebes through his journey of the emotions of pity, fear, and finally a catharsis. It is a tale of a man who unknowingly kills his father and fathers the children of his mother as well....   [tags: World Literature] 688 words
(2 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Literary Analysis: Arthur Miller’s “Death of a Salesman” – A Tragedy? - What is man’s focus in life. What is man’s purpose in life. Is it materialism and/or the prospect of how others may view him. Should man put their trust in God’s Word the Bible or leave it up to himself. In “Death of a Salesman” by Arthur Miller, but is it correct to define this theatric drama as a tragedy. According to Klaas Tindemans, “Aristotle’s concept of tragedy has been perceived as both a descriptive and a normative concept: a description of a practice as it should be continued” therefore, Aristotle’s definition of tragedy could be considered complex....   [tags: Literary Review]
:: 7 Works Cited
1418 words
(4.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Romeo and Juliet: A True Aristotelian Tragedy - Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare is often referred to as a classic love story. It is a story of love at first sight and fighting between families. The classic is a true tragedy because of the way it is created. Romeo and Juliet is an Aristotelian tragedy because it clearly follows the model shown by Aristotle. All aspects of the plot and characters perfectly follow way Aristotle defined. The plot follows the events that need to occur and the main characters have a flaw. Pity and fear is felt for the characters throughout the play....   [tags: Shakespearean Literature] 1077 words
(3.1 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
The Tragedy of Romeo and Juliet - Aristotle defined a tragedy as “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude with incidents arousing pity and fear.” His model of a true tragedy was the basis for modern tragedies. Considered one of the greatest writers of all time, William Shakespeare wrote many tragedies that are still performed today. His most famous is the twisted love story of Romeo and Juliet. While their tale is the quintessential love story, Romeo and Juliet’s love eventually causes their own destruction....   [tags: Shakespearean Literature ] 1291 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Tragedy Changes from One Hero to the Next - ... Readers pity Macbeth because he was never the type of person that would kill someone without probable cause. It’s unsettling to know that he let peer pressure get to him and ruin his life. All the more unsettling was the fact that his wife was the main source of pressure. When she committed suicide Macbeth said the life “is a tale/ Told by an idiot, full of sound and fury,/ Signifying nothing.” (Sparknotes “Macbeth”).At this point the readers hit the pinnacle of pity because he truthfully sees that he is unaccompanied and did so much wrong....   [tags: Literature]
:: 3 Works Cited
1077 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Tragedy-Bound - ... / I having for pattern, and thy lot – / Thine, O poor Oedipus – I envy not / Aught in mortality,” (Sophocles, 434-435). At the same time, Oedipus displays an act of terror by gouging his eyes out with pins from Jocasta’s dress (Sophocles, 438-439). Since Oedipus has been living without knowing the true origin of his birth, unknowingly fulfilling the prophecy he tried so hard to avoid, and consequently blinding himself out of shame, his tale appears to create stronger effects of pity and terror than that of Antigone or Creon....   [tags: Greek Literature ]
:: 1 Works Cited
1662 words
(4.7 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Scientific Materalism v. Crime and Punishment - ... It is this same selflessness which allows her to love and care for Raskolnikov, even after she finds out he is a murderer. There is also a strong feeling of love between Raskolnikov, his mother, Pulkheria, and his sister, Dunya. While reading a letter his mother wrote him, Raskolnikov learns that Dunya is engaged to be married and that he shall reap many benefits from the marriage. Although Raskolnikov had not seen his family in years, they maintained a strong bond between them. His mother and sister put their time and effort into helping him through his recent hardships and always kept him in their thoughts....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 5 Works Cited
2185 words
(6.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Hamlet is More Tragic than Antigone - ... The characters define the plot by prompting emotions of pity and fear, and producing “catharsis” and revealing their qualities through speech. The third important ingredient for tragedy is intellect or though, where something is proved to be or proved not to be. To put this in another way, Aristotle believes that something needs to dramatically change and effect how the characters see the world or a general maxim is enunciated. The fourth amongst the ingredients comes diction, where the expression of the meaning in words and its essence is the same both in verse and prose, song holding the chief place among the embellishments....   [tags: compare contrast comparison] 1076 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Stranger (The Outsider), Nausea, and Death on the Installment Plan - The Stranger (The Outsider), Nausea, and Death on the Installment Plan        The Stranger, by Albert Camus, Nausea, by Jean-Paul Sartre, and Death on the Installment Plan, by Louis-Ferdinand Celine, all contrast themselves with internal texts that fail to represent the world competently. The Stranger includes the prosecutor's narrative of the murders as an incompetent text by refusing to support the motives he assigns. It contrasts itself with the prosecutor's narrative in view of the excessive language of the prosecutor versus the simple reporting of Meursault....   [tags: comparison compare contrast essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
2503 words
(7.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Changes Made to the Draft of Strange Meeting - Changes Made to the Draft of Strange Meeting           Reality in warfare and the painful truths that accompany war are skillfully presented in Wilfred Owen's war poem "Strange Meeting."  Owen's poem is more powerful thanks to revisions the poet made as he struggled to understand the devastating effects of war, both emotionally and socially.  "Strange Meeting" underwent changes during its composition that signify changes in Owen's understanding of warfare and human interactions.  As he states in a draft of a preface to a book of poems, "My subject is War and the pity of War.  The Poetry is in the pity" (Ellmann and O'Clair 542).  Throughout the development of this poem, one can see Owen's concept of this pity change from a personal tragedy to a more universal waste.  Owen made several important changes to his poem "Strange Meeting" that enabled this universal pity to be more clearly presented.  He made the scene of the poem less dream-like and more like an actual encounter, he eliminated references to the identity of the enemy, and through this, the universality of his poem, the pity of war, is more plainly and powerfully conveyed....   [tags: Owen Strange Meeting Essays]
:: 3 Sources Cited
1664 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Antigone is a Tragic Hero - Antigone is a Tragic Hero A subject of debate in Sophocles’ play Antigone is which character complies with the characteristics of a tragic hero. The qualities that constitute a tragic hero are, in no particular order, having a high social position, not being overly good or bad, isolation, being tenacious in their actions, arousing pity in the audience, a revelatory manifestation, and having a single flaw that brings about their own demise and the demise of others around them. Creon possesses some of these qualities but, does not completely fulfill them all....   [tags: essays papers] 829 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A Comparison of Tukerys Observed by Seamus Heaney and View of a Pig by Ted Hughes - A Comparison of Tukerys Observed by Seamus Heaney and View of a Pig by Ted Hughes In the two poems - 'Turkeys Observed' and 'View of a Pig', the titles are very similar. 'View' and 'Observed' - to examine, and to watch. This gives the reader the impression that the poets were very attentive to the detail of the animals - and so made the poem more interesting. The main comparison between the two poems is that they are both about animals. One is about a 'Pig' and the other about a 'Turkey'....   [tags: Papers] 936 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman as Epic Tragedy - Arthur Miller's Death of a Salesman as Epic Tragedy     Aristotle's Poetics defines the making of a dramatic or epic tragedy and presents the general principles of the construction of this genre. Surprisingly, over the centuries authors have remained remarkably close to Aristotle's guidelines. Arthur Miller's twentieth century tragedy Death of a Salesman is an example of this adherence to Aristotle's prescription for tragedy. It is significant to test Aristotle's definition and requirements of tragedy by comparison and contrast, against a contemporary tragedy and to make observations with regard to what influence society and culture may have on the genre....   [tags: Death Salesman essays Arthur Miller]
:: 7 Works Cited
1420 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Medea as Woman, Hero and God in Euripides' Play - Medea as Woman, Hero and God In Euripides' play the title role and focus of the play is the foreign witch Medea. Treated differently through the play by different people and at different times, she adapts and changes her character, finally triumphing over her hated husband Jason. She can feasibly be seen as a mortal woman, Aristotle's tragic hero figure and even as an exulted goddess. Medea's identity as a weak woman is emphasised at the very start of the play. It is made very clear that she has come to misfortune through no fault of her own and is powerless in her problem ("her world has turned to enmity")....   [tags: Euripides Medea Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited :: 4 Sources Cited
2136 words
(6.1 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Evoking Sympathy for Macbeth - Evoking Sympathy for Macbeth      Within Macbeth the tragedy and demise of Macbeth is an important factor in determining his character as a tragic hero.  However in order to elucidate on this point we need to define what is a tragedy.  Aristotle within ‘Poetics’ highlighted what characteristics he believed to define tragedy these being; ’…Imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself...in a dramatic, not narrative form; with incidents arising pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions’ And immediately we are brought to tragedy and what the concept of a hero is....   [tags: Macbeth essays]
:: 4 Sources Cited
896 words
(2.6 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Reader Response to Sydney's Sonnets, Astrophil and Stella - Reader Response to Sydney's Sonnets, Astrophil and Stella As we discussed Astrophil and Stella in class, I felt a familiar knot in my stomach. At first I could not pin-point the reasons for my aversion to these sonnets. However, as we discussed it in class, it became clear to me. I could identify with Penelope Devereux Rich. Although Astrophil and Stella could be interpreted as an innocent set of love sonnets to an ideal woman and not a particular woman, they reminded me of the letters I received last year from a guy, Lee Burt, I had not seen in seven years....   [tags: Reader Response Essays] 1419 words
(4.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Finding Morality and Unity with God in Dante's Inferno - Finding Morality and Unity with God in Dante's Inferno Throughout the fast-paced lives of people, we are constantly making choices that shape who we are, as well as the world around us; however, one often debates the manner in which one should come to correct moral decisions, and achieve a virtuous existence. Dante has an uncanny ability to represent with such precision, the trials of the everyman’s soul to achieve morality and find unity with God, while setting forth the beauty, humor, and horror of human life....   [tags: Alighieri Biography Dante's Inferno Essays] 1404 words
(4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
A Passage from Hamlet - A Passage from Hamlet Hamlet is probably the best known and most popular play of William Shakespeare, and it is natural for any person to question what makes Hamlet a great tragedy and why it receives such praises. The answer is in fact simple; it effectively arouses pity and fear in the audiences’ mind. The audience feels pity when they see a noble character experiencing a regrettable downfall because of his innate tragic flaw, and they fear that the same thing might happen to them. Hamlet’s speech (III, iv, 139-180) contributes to producing this feeling of pity and fear....   [tags: essays papers] 2171 words
(6.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
How Elizabeth Gaskell Manipulates the Readers Feelings in The Half Brothers - How Elizabeth Gaskell Manipulates the Readers Feelings in The Half Brothers 'The Half-Brothers" is a story written in the mid-1900's by a middle-class Victorian writer called Elizabeth Gaskell. She has a strong moral interest in the difficulties of poor people who lived in abject poverty. This is what inspired her to write stories such as "The Half-Brothers". Some of her characters in this short story are described in such a way as to provoke sympathy and admiration for them from the reader. However other characters have much more depth to them and are more complicated....   [tags: The Half Brothers Elizabeth Gaskell Essays] 2505 words
(7.2 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Consider changes Owen made in Anthem For Doomed Youth. How effective - Consider changes Owen made in Anthem For Doomed Youth. How effective do you find them in presenting the Pity of War. In this essay I intend to analysis how effective the redrafts of the poem 'Anthem For Doomed Youth' by comparing the first and final drafts. I will go about this task by comparing and contrasting the parts of the poem, which have been change to the ones, which appeared in the final draft. The first change that one is confronted with is the change of the title. Owen begins with the word 'dead', which is changed to 'doomed'....   [tags: English Literature] 1677 words
(4.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Tragic Heroes in Sophocles’ Tragedy, Antigone - Aristotle’s definition of a tragic hero is someone of great importance or royalty. The hero must go through something terrible such as a relative’s death. We must feel what this character is feeling throughout the story. Aristotle also said that a tragic hero scan be defeated by a tragic flaw, such as hubris or human pride. In Sophocles’ tragedy Antigone, both Creon and Antigone are tragic heroes. In the play, Creon and Antigone can be seen as good or bad characters. Both of them show traits of justice....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Analytical Essay] 775 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Shakespeare's Use of Aristotle's Guidelines to Tragedy in Creating the Play Othello - Throughout time, the tragedy has been seen as the most emotionally pleasing form of drama, because of its ability to bring the viewer into the drama and feel for the characters, especially the tragic hero. This analysis of tragedy was formed by the Greek philosopher Aristotle, and also noted in his Poetics (guidelines to drama). As a playwright, Shakespeare used Aristotle’s guidelines to tragedy when writing Othello. The play that was created revolved around the tragic hero, Othello, whose tragic flaw transformed him from a nobleman, into a destructive creature, which would inevitably bring him to his downfall....   [tags: othello] 1584 words
(4.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Confliction of Good and Evil - The Confliction of Good and Evil In Boethius’s book, The Consolation of Philosophy, Boethius talks to Lady Philosophy about the pursuit of happiness, fate and free will, good, God, and evil, and fortune. Of all these important things, good, God, and evil are the most significant topics of their conversations. Boethius talks to Lady Philosophy about evil and why it does not get punished every time. He also asks her about the goodness of humans and why they sometimes do not have as much power as the evil....   [tags: Boethius] 891 words
(2.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Honorable Betrayal - Honorable Betrayal The William Shakespeare play The Tragedy of Julius Caesar tells the story of the assassination of Julius Caesar and the eight conspirators behind it. The play takes place in 44 B.C. in Rome. Marcus Brutus is the protagonist and face-man of the insidious conspiracy. He is also the tragic hero in this classic work of literature. Aristotle’s definition of the tragic hero is a character that has a character flaw, also known as hubris, and experiences a downfall from a high position in society due to this flaw....   [tags: Character Analysis] 1051 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
“The Human Form Divine” - William Blake was viewed as one of the most eccentric, but brilliant, poets of the Romantic period. In his works could be found “recurring themes of good and evil, knowledge and innocence, and external reality versus inner” (Merriman). Many of his poems were Biblically based and spiritually uplifting. And then there were the counterparts: realistic illustrations of men of the age. These poems were often harsh, blunt, and dark and not accepted well by society. Blake’s poems “The Divine Image” and “A Divine Image” are only two in the vast collection of contradictions....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 4 Works Cited
1027 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Romeo and Juliet: A True Tragedy - A tragedy imitates the emotional events of life by showing instead of telling. It does not have to be an exact replication of life, but instead have some realistic aspects to it. This type of play is special because an event in the plot is caused by a preceding choice or action performed by the character. Therefore, unlike a story where occurrences are caused by coincidences, a tragedy must have events that inescapably connect to one another as a result of the characters’ choices. Consequently, this idea of cause and effect must direct the plot of the play until the protagonists have an unfortunate end....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 4 Works Cited
2246 words
(6.4 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Romeo and Juliet a True Aristotelean Tragedy - Romeo and Juliet a True Aristotelean Tragedy Aristotle defines a tragedy as “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude”. However, it is his claim that a story must contain six parts in order to be a tragedy that causes much controversy. Many critics argue that William Shakespeare does not follow the guidelines for a tragic story in his famous piece Romeo and Juliet. Their main argument is with the way he presents his tragic elements. But as Lois Kerschen says, “Shakespeare may have altered the classic form of the Greek tragedy, but that does not mean he totally ignored the Greek formula”(261)....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 4 Works Cited
1001 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Authors’ Reactions to Vietnam: Wallace Terry and Tim O’Brien - ... He feels as though this war has changed him, which it has. Not surprising, then, is that his purpose in writing this book is to make people feel that same pity. He talks many times about “story truth” vs. “real truth.” Doing this enables him to show the reader that it does not matter if a story really happened; it was war and it was hell. He strives to make the reader understand the truth of the war, and, by doing so, forces them to feel pity for all those involved in the war. However, his purpose goes a little beyond that....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 6 Works Cited
2518 words
(7.2 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
"All must love the human form" - ... The third stanza is where Blake gives the four abstract qualities to man which makes them recognizable because of their features. Next, in his final stanza, he uses common prejudices of his day to offer a universal vision of God that transcends to all religious, racial, and cultural boundaries (Granger). He states that where “mercy, love and pity dwell there God is dwelling too,” which reinforces the idea that wherever those attributes lie in people, God is there too. Blake also makes changes in the four virtues, such as, in the fourth stanza “love” is out of order which emphasizes its importance over the other three virtues....   [tags: Poetry Analysis ]
:: 5 Works Cited
1050 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Tragedy and Comedy - ... His humanity is timeless. While a Comedy’s main character does not require us to feel pity or fear, we still must relate, albeit in different ways. In Lysistrata, the main character is a confident and quick-witted and although she is subject to sexist comments and assumptions, she still works to save the men “in spite” of themselves. (Sophocles 174) When Lysistrata says, “I’m only a woman, I know; but I’ve a mind” (Sophocles 185), we all can relate to the cry of her heart to be heard. What person, minority or not, hasn’t felt judged by outward appearances....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1264 words
(3.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Discourse on Religion: Nietzsche and Edwards - ... 49). Nietzsche proceeds to deride the value system of Christianity, spelling out what he sees through the will to power as definitions for happiness, good, and bad (Nietzsche, Sec. 2). For Nietzsche, happiness is the feeling bolstered by power: “that a resistance is overcome,” good is all that bolsters the feeling of power itself in man, and bad stems from that leading up to weakness (Nietzsche, Sec. 2). Nietzsche calls out Christianity as that which supports human weakness, affirming by way of pity a human’s frailty and sickness, “active sympathy for the ill-constituted as weak” (Nietzsche, Sec....   [tags: Philosophy, Christianity] 1001 words
(2.9 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Love between Social Classes in The Grapes of Wrath and The Great Gatsby - ... This underlying force exists not only in these scenes of the two novels, but runs throughout both storylines. Both sets of protagonists feel the drive of the force and move forwards, inspired by their dreams. Along the way, others that are in a position to help them do so. Through actions such as these, both authors illustrate the common, ineffable force of love between social classes on purpose and in a unified effort. Though both novels exhibit the impalpable feeling of brotherly love, they go about presenting it in different ways....   [tags: John Steinbeck, F. Scott Fitzgerald ]
:: 2 Works Cited
1310 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Jilting Of Granny Weatherall - The Jilting of Granny Weatherall In Katherine Ann Porter’s "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall," there are two prevalant themes. The first is self-pity. The second theme is the acceptance of her immenent demise. Both deal with the way people perceive their deaths and mortality in general. Granny Weatherall’s behavior is Porter’s tool for making these themes visible to the reader. The theme of self-pity is obvious and throughly explored early on. As a young lady, Granny Weatherall left at the alter on her wedding day ....   [tags: essays research papers] 548 words
(1.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Canto V of Dante’s Inferno - Canto V of Dante’s Inferno In Dante’s Inferno, part of The Divine Comedy, Canto V introduces the torments of Hell in the Second Circle. Here Minos tells the damned where they will spend eternity by wrapping his tail around himself. The Second Circle of Hell holds the lustful; those who sinned with the flesh. They are punished in the darkness by an unending tempest, which batters them with winds and rain. Hell is not only a geographical place, but also a representation of the potential for sin and evil within every individual human soul....   [tags: essays papers] 578 words
(1.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Sympathy Towards Oedipus in Oedipus Rex - Sympathy Towards Oedipus in Oedipus Rex In the play Oedipus Rex, the author Sophocles, attempts to create feelings of sympathy towards the main character, Oedipus. This is achieved by using dramatic irony, the prophecy that guided Oedipus towards the truth regarding his childhood, and key scenes in the play, which help to build the audiences understanding and opinions concerning his situation. Through the prophecy alone, Oedipus was doomed even before his life had even begun. As an innocent child, his parents, King Laios and Queen Iokaste, had tried to rid themselves of the curse, which was cast upon them by Apollo, the god of the sun....   [tags: Papers] 485 words
(1.4 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Shakespearian tragedy - By Shakespeare¡¦s time, the characteristics of tragedy in drama had been redefined. In the plays of the early Greeks, the tragic hero was a noble man who rose to the heights of success only to be plummeted to defeat and despair by his own tragic flaw, or hamartia. The plot structure in these early tragedies was relatively straightforward; the motive of the dramatist was to elicit pity and terror from the audience through empathy with the tragic hero. What once had been a relatively simple form was gradually altered by playwrights to allow for more depth in characterization, more flexibility in plot structure, and the element of comic relief....   [tags: essays research papers] 358 words
(1 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Sympathy for the Tragic Hero of Shakespeare's Macbeth - Sympathy for the Tragic Hero of Macbeth        A tragedy according to Aristotle within ‘Poetics’ is; ’…Imitation of an action that is serious and also, as having magnitude, complete in itself...in a dramatic, not narrative form; with incidents arising pity and fear, wherewith to accomplish its catharsis of such emotions’ In Shakespeare's play, Macbeth, the character of Macbeth murders his king, Duncan, for personal motives, there appears to be little subjective reasoning for the murder.  This perhaps encapsulates the notion of an incident which has the potential to arise pity from an audience....   [tags: GCSE English Literature Coursework]
:: 3 Sources Cited
841 words
(2.4 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula - Coppola's Adaptation of Bram Stoker's Dracula      The legendary creature Dracula has mesmerized readers and viewers for nearly a century. In Bram Stoker's masterpiece, Dracula, the infamous monster affects each reader in a different way. Some find the greatest fear to be the sacrilegious nature of his bloodsucking attacks, while others find themselves most afraid of Dracula's shadow-like omnipresent nature. The fascination with Dracula has assimilated into all parts of society. Dracula can now be seen selling breakfast cereals, making appearances on Sesame Street, and on the silver screen....   [tags: Movie Film comparison compare contrast]
:: 3 Works Cited
1154 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Comparing Good and Evil in Tolkien’s The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings - Comparing Good and Evil in Tolkien’s The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings Imagine yourself in a pre-industrial world full of mystery and magic. Imagine a world full of monsters, demons, and danger, as well as a world full of friends, fairies, good wizards, and adventure. In doing so you have just taken your first step onto a vast world created by author and scholar John Ronald Reuel Tolkien. Tolkien became fascinated by language at an early age during his schooling, in particularly, the languages of Northern Europe, both ancient and modern....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited :: 1 Sources Cited
2386 words
(6.8 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
An Argument Against Abortion - Abortion in America is a controversial issue in which both sides have valid arguments at face value. The pro-choice side has many arguments to support it belief in keeping abortion legal. Many of these are faulty, and argue points irrelevant to the issue as I will attempt to illustrate, thereby eliminating the main pro-choice arguments. The pro-life position has somewhat different ideas. The most popular of these is: The unborn entity is fully human from the moment of conception. Abortion results in the intentional death of the unborn entity....   [tags: Pro Life Pro-life essays research papers] 1034 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Aristotle On Tragedy - The Nature of Tragedy:In the century after Sophocles, the philosopher Aristotle analyzed tragedy. His definition: Tragedy then, is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude; in language embellished with each kind of artistic ornament, the several kinds being found in separate parts of the play; in the form of action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions.Aristotle identified six basic elements: (1) plot; (2) character; (3) diction (the choice of style, imagery, etc.); (4) thought (the character's thoughts and the author's meaning); (5) spectacle (all the visual effects; Aristotle considered this to be the least important element); (6) song.According to Aristotle, the central character of a tragedy must not be so virtuous that instead of feeling pity or fear at his or her downfall, we are simply outraged....   [tags: essays research papers] 1035 words
(3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Aristotleian Tragedy In Hamlet And Macbeth - Hamlet and Macbeth Analyzed as Aristotelian Tragedies Aristotle’s Poetics is considered the guide to a well written tragedy; his methods have been used for centuries. Aristotle defines a tragedy as “an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude… in the form of an action, not of narrative; through pity and fear effecting the proper purgation of these emotions” (House, 82). The philosopher believes the plot to be the most vital aspect of a tragedy, thus all other parts such as character, diction, and thought stem from the plot....   [tags: essays research papers] 1853 words
(5.3 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
chorus role in medea - The Chorus influences our response to Medea and her actions in both a positive and negative manner. The Chorus, a body of approximately fifteen Corinthian women who associate the audience with the actors, is able to persuade and govern us indirectly through sympathy for what has been done to Medea, a princess of Colchis and the victim of her husband’s betrayal of love for another woman. The Chorus also lead us to through sympathy for Medea to accept her decision of taking revenge on princess Glauce and Jason....   [tags: essays research papers] 798 words
(2.3 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
The Perfect Aristotelian Tragedy: Oedipus the King by Sophocles - The Perfect Aristotelian Tragedy: Oedipus the King by Sophocles Works Cited Not Included Oedipus the King is an excellent example of Aristotle's theory of tragedy. The play has the perfect Aristotelian tragic plot consisting of paripeteia, anagnorisis and catastrophe; it has the perfect tragic character that suffers from happiness to misery due to hamartia (tragic flaw) and the play evokes pity and fear that produces the tragic effect, catharsis (a purging of emotion). Oedipus the King has the ingredients necessary for the plot of a good tragedy, including the peripeteia....   [tags: World Literature Aristotle Oedipus Essays Papers] 1421 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie as a Tragedy - Tennessee Williams' The Glass Menagerie as a Tragedy The Glass Menagerie has, of course, been labelled as many different types of play, for one, a tragedy. At first glance it is clear that audiences today may, indeed, class it as such. However, if, looking at the traditional definition of the classification 'tragedy', one can more easily assess whether or not the Glass Menagerie fits under this title. To do this I will be using the views of Aristotle, the Greek philosopher, who first defined the word 'tragedy' and in his views, a tragedy contained certain, distinctive characteristics....   [tags: Papers Tennessee Williams Menagerie Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1493 words
(4.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Examining the Three Deaths in William Shakespeare's Macbeth - Examining the Three Deaths in William Shakespeare's Macbeth I will show how Shakespeare makes us feel horror pity and fear by examining three of the deaths in the play. These are the three main components to any tragedy, dating back to the ancient Greek tragedies. I will look at the murder of King Duncan and that of Banquo as well as the killing of young Macduff and his mother. The play was Macbeth was probably first performed in front of King James at Hampton Court Palace in 1606; six centuries after the birth of the real Macbeth on whose life the play is loosely based....   [tags: Papers] 1586 words
(4.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
A rose for emily character analysis - Pity for Emily??. In the short story A Rose for Emily, by William Faulkner there is a very interesting character. Her Name is Emily Grierson and she is a rich southern gentile. All her life it seems that she was raised at a standard that was above the rest. By living such a secluded and controlled life it set her up for the happenings in her future. When her father passed away she had nobody to tell her what to do and how to act. This was very devastating and she had a hard time dealing with change....   [tags: essays research papers] 619 words
(1.8 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
The Role of Women in Homer's The Odyssey - The Role of Women in Homer's The Odyssey Women form an important part of the folk epic, written by Homer, The Odyssey. Within the story there are three basic types of women: the goddess, the seductress, and the good hostess/wife. Each role adds a different element and is essential to the telling of the story. The role of the goddess is one of a supernatural being, but more importantly one in a position to pity and help mortals. Athena, the goddess of wisdom, is the most prominent example of the role; in the very beginning of the story she is seen making a plea for Odysseus' return home, and throughout the first half of the book she assists him in his journey....   [tags: Papers Odyssey Homer Essays] 685 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Tragedy of “Oedipus the King” - “Oedipus the King” by Sophocles is a tragedy of a man who unknowingly kills his father and marries his mother. Aristotles’ ideas of tragedy are tragic hero, hamartia, peripeteia, anagnorisis, and catharsis these ideas well demonstrated throughout Sophocles tragic drama of “Oedipus the King”. Tragic hero is a character of noble stature and has greatness but is triggered by some error and causes the hero’s downfall. Oedipus is the tragic hero of “Oedipus the king”. Oedipus has a noble stature and has greatness....   [tags: Sophocles, Literary Analysis] 1018 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Marcus Brutus, The Most Noble Roman in Shakespeare's Play Julius Caesar - Being ethical, patriotic, reasonable, and showing selflessness are just a few characteristics of a noble man. After the death of respected Julius Caesar, the speedy fight for power exposed the veracious side of Roman figures. William Shakespeare, in his play Julius Caesar, examines the struggles for the title of the noblest Roman between ethical Marcus Brutus and other power thirsty Romans to reveal the most honorable man. Marcus Brutus shows qualities of a noble roman through patriotism. He makes many tough decisions that result in questioning his character, but the actions he takes are for the betterment and out of the love for Rome....   [tags: Julius Caesar] 776 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Antony - A Tragic Hero? - In order to determine whether Antony is a tragic hero in Antony and Cleopatra, we must first define exactly what a tragic hero is, before being able to analyse whether Antony is portrayed as such. It is generally accepted that a tragic hero is a “man of noble stature”, who falls from a place grace, who exhibits many extraordinary qualities that set him apart from other men and who is a remarkable example of someone in his position. A key element of a tragic hero is that the audience must feel pity for the character’s death or downfall and there are several reasons both why the audience would feel pity for and why they wouldn’t feel pity for Antony upon his death....   [tags: Character Analysis]
:: 4 Works Cited
1449 words
(4.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Plato and Aristotle's Definition of Art - Two and a half centuries ago in the Mediterranean, the definition of art was not synonymous with the term as we know it. It encompassed painting, sculpting, poetry, and all what he still recognize as art, as well as craftwork, carpentry and similar occupations. Plato was the first to address the nature of art seriously, and did so quite emphatically. Considering it unimportant and even dangerous, he denounced it. His student, Aristotle, who handled the same subject next, held incompatible and sometimes opposing views on the matter....   [tags: Philosophy] 1261 words
(3.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Standing Up to the Status Quo - Considering that traditional society looked down on women as inferior to men, the female roles in each work challenge the status quo and make their audiences’ eyes wearier to the society they might have previously backed without question. The book We, and the plays Antigone and A Doll’s House provide rich support for individual reasoning and ardent opposition to mindless devotion to establishment. Zamyatin’s story opens with a perspective in support of the fanatical institution, but on deeper levels of commentary contradictions are already starting to propagate....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 1200 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]


Your search returned over 400 essays for "pity"
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [Next >>]



Copyright © 2000-2014 123HelpMe.com. All rights reserved. Terms of Service