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Stephen Crane's The Open Boat - Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat"        “None of them knew the color of the sky.” This first sentence in Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat” implies the overall relationship between the individual and nature. This sentence also implies the limitations of anyone’s perspective. The men in the boat concentrate so much on the danger they are in, that they are oblivious and unaware to everything else; in other words, maybe lacking experience. “The Open Boat” begins with a description of four men aboard a small boat on a rough sea....   [tags: Open Boat Stephen Crane Essays] 776 words
(2.2 pages)
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The Power of Nature Revealed in The Open Boat - The Power of Nature Revealed in The Open Boat     In 1894, Stephen Crane said, "A man said to the universe: 'Sir, I exist!' 'However,' replied the universe, 'The fact has not created in me a sense of obligation.'" This short encounter of man and nature is representative of Crane’s view of nature. However, he did not always see nature as indifferent to man. In 1887, he survived a shipwreck with two other men. "The Open Boat" is his account from an outsider’s point of view of the two days spent in a dinghy....   [tags: Open Boat Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
930 words
(2.7 pages)
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Determinism, Objectivity, and Pessimism in The Open Boat - Determinism, Objectivity, and Pessimism in The Open Boat         In Stephen Crane's short story "The Open Boat", the American literary school of naturalism is used and three of the eight features are most apparent, making this work, in my opinion, a good example of the school of naturalism. These three of the eight features are determinism, objectivity, and pessimism. They show, some more than others, how Stephen Crane viewed the world and the environment around him.         Determinism is of course the most obvious of the three features....   [tags: Open Boat Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
694 words
(2 pages)
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Indifference to Anxiety in Crane's The Open Boat - Indifference to Anxiety in Crane's The Open Boat    In recent years, critical response to Stephen Crane's The Open Boat has shifted dramatically, focusing less on the tale's philosophical agendas than on its epistemological implications. The story no longer stands as merely a naturalistic depiction of nature's monumental indifference or as simply an existential affirmation of fife's absurdity. Instead, we have slowly come to realize a new level of the text, one that, according to Donna Gerstenberger, explores "man's limited capacities for knowing reality" (557)....   [tags: Open Boat Essays]
:: 3 Works Cited
2604 words
(7.4 pages)
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Stephen Crane's The Open Boat - Stephen Crane's The Open Boat Humanity often tends to see itself as being somehow important in the grand scheme of the Universe. We speak of 'fate' as if we were put here for some reason, or purpose. We have our religions, which often serve as an engine to drive our lives and as a means to give meaning to them. But why do we think of ourselves in such a superior fashion. Do we really matter at all. Would the Universe stop if we were suddenly taken away. In his short story, 'The Open Boat,' Stephen Crane shows us a Universe totally unconcerned with the affairs of humankind; it is an indifferent Universe in which Man has to struggle to survive....   [tags: Stephen Crane Open Boat Essays Papers]
:: 1 Works Cited
1032 words
(2.9 pages)
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Analysis of The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - Analysis of The Open Boat by Stephen Crane Story: “The Open Boat,” 1897 Author: Stephen Crane (1871-1900) Central Character: There is no real central character in this story. All the men on the boat are spoken about more or less equally and no prominent character jumps out at the reader as being the central character. Although more emphasis is put onto the correspondent, and Billie the oiler. Other Character: The cook: bails water from boat. Billie the oiler: steers and rows boat, is the only of the men that does not make it alive to land....   [tags: The Open Boat Stephen Crane Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1402 words
(4 pages)
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Relationship between the Individual and Nature in The Open Boat - Relationship between the Individual and Nature in "The Open Boat"         From the beginning, the four characters in the aftermath of a shipwreck do not know "the colour of the sky" but all of them know "the colours of the sea."  This opening strongly suggests the symbolic situations in which human beings are located in the universe.  The sky personifies the mysterious, inconceivable cause of reality , which humans cannot understand, and the sea symbolizes the earthy, mundane phenomenon, which humans are supposed to perceive.  The symbolic picture generated by the above conflict implies the overall relationship between the individual and nature.   In fact, the daily life of human beings...   [tags: Open Boat Essays] 553 words
(1.6 pages)
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Symbolism and Devices in Stephen Crane's The Open Boat - An Examination of Symbolism and Devices in The Open Boat     The struggle for survival by mankind can be found in many different settings.  It can be seen on a battlefield, a hospital room or at sea as related in “The Open Boat”, written in 1897 by Stephen Crane.  The story is based on his actual experiences when he survived the sinking of the SS Commodore off the coast of Florida in early 1897.  “The Open Boat” is Stephen Crane’s account of life and death at sea told through the use of themes and devices to emphasize the indifference of nature to man’s struggles and the development of mankind’s compassion....   [tags: Open Boat Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
1931 words
(5.5 pages)
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The Open Boat - “When it came night, the white waves passed to and fro in the moonlight, and the wind brought the sound of the great sea’s voice to the men on the shore, and they felt they could then be interpreters” (Crane 370). “The Open Boat,” written by Stephen Crane, describes the journey of four men stranded in a dinghy in the middle of the ocean and the hardships that had to be faced in order to survive. This story is not only a riveting story, keeping readers on the edge of their seat, but the story also makes the reader realize how precious life truly is....   [tags: Literary Analysis, Stephen Crane] 2637 words
(7.5 pages)
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The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - “The Open Boat” is short tale of endurance, suffering, and redemption. The story focuses on four interesting sailors on a journey towards survival. They try their best to overcome the adversities of the water and raging storm. Crane focuses on the constant struggle of man’s immobility to control his own life. “The Open Boat” is a nonfictional fiction some call it. It typically is argued as only fiction, but many lean toward its nonfictional quality. Crane wrote the story based off his real life experience of a shipwreck he tragically endured....   [tags: suffering, redemption, oiler, sailors]
:: 9 Works Cited
1891 words
(5.4 pages)
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The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - “The Open Boat”” “From the first moment [sentence referencing “the sky”], … The Open Boat proceeds as a traditional sea journey to knowledge, and the knowledge it attains is equally as mysterious or religious as that envisioned in other great American sea journeys ---…” The “Open Boat” is a short story written by Stephen Crane (1871-1900). This story develops the tragic fate of the SS Commodore. This ship had for mission to transport ammunition for the Cuban rebels from Jacksonville, Florida to Cuba with his 28 Souls On Board....   [tags: Short Story Analysis]
:: 5 Works Cited
1170 words
(3.3 pages)
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The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - In the story "The Open Boat," by Stephen Crane, Crane uses many literary techniques to convey the stories overall theme. The story is centered on four men: a cook, a correspondent, Billie, an oiler who is the only character named in the story, and a captain. They are stranded in a lifeboat in stormy seas just off the coast of Florida, just after their ship has sunk. Although they can eventually see the shore, the waves are so big that it is too dangerous to try to take the boat in to land. Instead, the men are forced to take the boat further out to sea, where the waves are not quite as big and dangerous....   [tags: Short Story Analysis, Writing Techniques]
:: 1 Works Cited
1317 words
(3.8 pages)
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The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - ... Additionally, the colors are so vivid that you visualize the movie of what is happening in the story because of this description. The narrator uses animal like characteristics to show that the waves were controlling the boat’s direction as opposed to the people steering the boat. He says, “as each wave came, and she rose for it, she seemed like a horse making at a fence outrageously high” (shorter seventh edition, 190) to illustrate that the ocean was trying to outrun the boat by making an obstacle for the boat to overcome....   [tags: relationship between man and nature] 993 words
(2.8 pages)
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Autobiography in The Open Boat - The Open Boat is based off the true story of the sinking of the Commodore. Stephen Crane had a traumatic shipwreck in January 1897. After the crash on the 10-foot boat, Crane was lost at sea for 30 hours. He was later rescued and wrote 3 different writings on the sinking of Commodore (Eye). Crane’s afterthought of the sinking of the Commodore led to the short story. It was initially published as “Stephen Crane’s Own Story” (Hayes). The Open Boat is now a fictional tale written by Stephen Crane to portray his struggling experience....   [tags: sinking of the Commodore]
:: 7 Works Cited
548 words
(1.6 pages)
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Stephen Crane's The Open Boat - “The Open Boat” was written by Stephen Crane in 1897. This is an extremely powerful short story fictionalized by one of Crane’s own experiences out at sea. He is able to use what has happened to him, and spice it up to turn his story into a fictional account everyone can relate to. The reasons this story is so powerful is because of the literary devices Crane uses throughout the story, especially symbolism. In “The Open Boat,” Crane uses the four main characters, the dinghy, the waves, and the sea-weed as symbols to produce a microcosm of society....   [tags: literary analysis, fiction novels]
:: 1 Works Cited
1108 words
(3.2 pages)
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Stephen Crane's The Open Boat - Nature is its own being. It does not care how it affects people, nor does it care whether its actions are understood by man. Nature does not set out to purposely harm nor help anyone. In other words, it is not cruel or compassionate. It is simply its own indifferent being. Stephen Crane shows this in his short story, “The Open Boat”. Stephen Crane writes this story from a real life experience in which he too was stranded on a dinghy after being shipwrecked. Through this story, his feelings about nature are revealed (Spofford 1)....   [tags: nature's indifference, literary analysis]
:: 7 Works Cited
1242 words
(3.5 pages)
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Naturalisn In The Open Boat - In most traditional happy ending stories, there always appears to be evidence of supernaturalism. However, Stephen Crane leaves out all fairy tale elements and mystical creatures in his “The Open Boat”. Throughout the whole story, there are constant examples of the raw, realistic and indifferent parts of life. In Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat” naturalism is apparent through the use of language, literary techniques, and thematic elements. First of all, Crane’s use of language played a large part in the naturalistic feel of the story....   [tags: Stephen Crane] 965 words
(2.8 pages)
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Stephen Crane's The Open Boat - Stephen Crane’s story, “The Open Boat”, retells a tragic event that actually occurred in his life. This story is told from a third person point-of-view. He chooses to let a narrator reveal the character’s emotions and inner thoughts. From this perspective, the reader can fully experience what happened during their struggle to survive. Crane wants the reader to connect with each individual character and feel their independent struggle as they work together to reach the shore alive. The narrator helps the reader to feel the despair of the freezing, drowning men and the pain of losing one of the “Brotherhood”....   [tags: Story, Personal Narrative, Literary Analysis]
:: 1 Works Cited
1312 words
(3.7 pages)
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The Open Boat - The Open Boat is a particularly interesting story because of the great detail that author extends and because of the solitary reflections of the characters in consideration of their demise. The story possesses amazingly vivid description. This attention to detail affords the reader the greatest degree of reading pleasure. Crane paints such glorious images in reader's mind with his eloquence. "The morning appeared finally, in its splendor, with a sky of pure blue, and the sunlight flamed on the tips of waves"(387)....   [tags: essays research papers] 379 words
(1.1 pages)
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The Open Boat - Open Boat Symbolism allows writers to suggest their ideas within a piece of literature. This is found in most types of writing. Stephen Crane expresses this in his short story, The Open Boat. Through symbolism and allegory, it is demonstrated that humans live in a universe that is unconcerned with them. The characters in the story come face to face with this indifference and are nearly overcome by Nature’s lack of concern. This is established in the opening scenes, the “seven mad gods” and in the realization of the dying soldier....   [tags: essays research papers] 577 words
(1.6 pages)
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The Theme of Community in the Open Boat - Stephen Crane's Theme of Community Stephen Crane is well known in the literary world for his many underlying themes. In Stephan Crane's "The Open Boat," one of the many themes that can be seen is that of community. He brings to life the importance of the each individual's role in the group setting. Crane uses a dire situation in which men's lives are in the hands of each other to show that without group togetherness no one would make it. He shows the group being given false hopes from outside forces but, how in the end the group must band together for survival and not rely on anything but themselves....   [tags: American Literature Stephan Crane]
:: 3 Works Cited
2424 words
(6.9 pages)
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The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - The Open Boat by Stephen Crane “The Open Boat” Four men drift across a January sea in an open boat, since they lost their ship some time after dawn. Now, in the clear light of day, the men begin to grasp the full gravity of their situation. Realizing that their main conflict will be man versus nature, in this case, the raging sea. In the short story “The Open Boat,” Stephen Crane gives an itemized description of the two days spent on a ten-foot dinghy by four men a cook, a correspondent, which is Crane himself, the injured Captain and Billy Higgens, the oiler....   [tags: Papers] 579 words
(1.7 pages)
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Analyzing Forms of Survival in The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - ... The correspondent struggled with the fact that he was dealt a bad hand concerning his current situation. It is definitely described as a flaw in his make-up (Higgins). The cook seems to be the sailor who keeps hope alive in the group. He also is endowed in fear. The cook’s strong persona of fear is a gift of strength but also a curse of fear as the boat slowly sinks (Crane 6). Fear seems to keep the cook surviving, and he survives at the end of the book. Like many people today the cook joy keeps him going as well....   [tags: sailor, vessel, waves]
:: 3 Works Cited
533 words
(1.5 pages)
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The Fountainhead by Ayn Rand and The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - ... Of course, if you go, Mr. Francon will take somebody else. People will talk about that. Everybody knows that Mr. Francon picks out the best boy from Stanton every year for his office. I wonder how it’ll look if some other boy gets the job. But I guess that doesn’t matter.”” (P.35). this quote shows collectivism by showing how “emotional” one can be about not being better than his/her peers around them. Ayn’s point of view on free will in this quote shown telling of how Peter Keating had a choice on whether to take Guy Francons job offer or go to the Beaux-Arts academy for architecture, even though his mother was pressuring him into taking the job for Francon....   [tags: free will, naturism, realism, collectivism] 859 words
(2.5 pages)
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Loneliness, a theme in The Open Boat by Stephen Crane - ... Another symbol that is shown throughout the story is the symbol of hope. This is represented by several things; first, the lighthouse, then the house, then the man, and finally the star. Most of them are surrounded in darkness, as hopes often are in life, and seem very small. For example, when they described the lighthouse, they said, “It was precisely like the point of a pin. It took an anxious eye to find a light house so tiny.” Line 37. Also, the house which they thought was a lifesaving house was also small and shrouded in blackness; “A tiny house was blocked out black upon the sky.”line 61....   [tags: Literature, Analysis]
:: 1 Works Cited
576 words
(1.6 pages)
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Man and the Vain Struggle Against Nature & Himself: Determinism in Stephen Crane’s The Open Boat - Stephen Crane’s short story, “The Open Boat,” conveys the experiences of four men who survive a shipwreck and find themselves set afloat on a life boat in the middle of the ocean. On the surface, the story paints a picture of the perils of being lost at sea and of the way that four men can come together in a time of distress and count on one another for strength and companionship. However, the story also discusses the theme of determinism, or the ideas that there are forces acting upon an individual, that these forces are beyond the control of the individual, and that these forces impact and shape the lives of those on whom they are exerted....   [tags: shipwreck, life, boat, ocean] 1805 words
(5.2 pages)
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Open Boat, A Review - Stephen Crane's Open Boat is a story about survival: a story about struggling to survive in a very hostile world. The story is a question of man's relationship to the world of nature that is completely overpowering. The four main characters were stuck in a ten-foot dingey. Being in a small dingey at a very doomed situation is the worst of all the worst scenarios; riding in a very small craft in turbulent waters is obviously a suicide. But what can they do. They have no choice. They have to stay alive....   [tags: Book Reviews] 328 words
(0.9 pages)
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Open Boat - "The Open Boat," by Stephen Crane, has been critiqued and deconstructed by many thinkers. One such critique is "The Dialogic Narrative of `The Open Boat'." This critique on Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat," was written by two authors: Sura P. Rath and Mary Neff Shaw. The authors focused on a five main points in the duration of this Critique. First Mikail Baktin's theory of the "Five basic types of discourses," are discussed and used in the deconstruction of "The Open Boat." The critique then delves into the use of first-person actor-character to third person spectator-narrator....   [tags: American Literature] 543 words
(1.6 pages)
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Open Boat - Throughout my reading I have found that Crane uses many symbolic objects to depict true-life events. He uses symbols such as towers, animals, and waves. Crane leaves so much to the reader’s imagination that the story can be considered magical and mysterious. The composition leaves many details up to the readers inference, however after further research a full picture to the events that transpired that cold January are uncovered. “The Open Boat,” is very rich in symbolism. Symbolism evokes or describes ideas and feelings through the use of symbolic images....   [tags: essays research papers] 1122 words
(3.2 pages)
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Pursuit of Knowledge in Inferno and The Open Boat - Pursuit of Knowledge in Inferno and The Open Boat It is inherent for man to want to understand more about himself and the universe in which he lives. Galilio Galilei stated, "I do not feel obliged to believe that the same God who has endowed us with sense, reason, and intellect has intended us to forgo their use." However, the pursuit of knowledge has not been easy, for man has endured several obstacles, whether willingly or by chance as presented in Genesis, Dante's "Inferno," and Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat." Since his creation, man has encountered obstacles in his pursuit of knowledge....   [tags: Divine Comedy Inferno Essays] 630 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Open Boat: Crane's View of Naturalism - To define one's purpose is at the very least human nature and at the very most the meaning of life. Humans seek the significance of existence and try to define it in many ways. There are thousands of religions and countless seminars to help people discover the point of human existence. The idea that we may all be irrelevant in the grand scheme of life or to the universe is not a popular position. In his short story "The Open Boat" Stephen Crane shows a universe that is unconcerned with the struggles of four men within a small boat lost at sea....   [tags: American Literature]
:: 1 Works Cited
1085 words
(3.1 pages)
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Open Boat vs. Hurricane Hugo - Humanity tends to see itself as being somewhat important in the grand scheme of the Universe. We speak of "fate" as if we were put here for some reason, or purpose. We have our religions, which often serve as an engine to drive our lives and as a means to give meaning to them. But why do we think of ourselves in such a superior fashion. Would the Universe stop if we were suddenly taken away. In his short story, "The Open Boat," Stephen Crane shows us a Universe totally unconcerned with the affairs of humankind; it is an indifferent Universe in which Man has to struggle to survive....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 2 Works Cited
1967 words
(5.6 pages)
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The Effectivness of Literary Techniques Used in Stephen Crane’s The Open Boat - ... They took turns rowing (their most dreaded but crucial task) until they spotted land, and a man. They argued for a while, about if help was coming or not, but the powerful sea kept them at work and eventually threw them off the boat into cold January water, forcing them to swim ashore. Despite consistent negative thoughts of drowning and analyzing the reason for their possible nearing death, the four men made it to shore with the help of an obliging passerby. The story ends with the call of the sea at night to the men, and the men feeling that they could interpret the sea’s voice....   [tags: organization, characters, imagery] 851 words
(2.4 pages)
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Stephen Crane's The Open Boat and Jack London's To Build A Fire - Stephen Crane's The Open Boat and Jack London's To Build A Fire Stephen Crane’s short story, “The Open Boat” speaks directly to Jack London’s own story, “To Build A Fire” in their applications of naturalism and views on humanity. Both writers are pessimistic in their views of humanity and are acutely aware of the natural world. The representations of their characters show humans who believe that they are strong and can ably survive, but these characters many times overestimate themselves which can lead to an understanding of their own mortality as they face down death....   [tags: Literacy Analysis ]
:: 2 Works Cited
2312 words
(6.6 pages)
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The Arrogance of Man in Stephen Crane’s Short Story, The Open Boat - ... The crew gets more cheerful as the approach land, and become optimistic at the thought of a possible life-saving station being nearby the lighthouse. After being unable to reach shore due to the rough seas, the men’s optimism evaporates as they realize help won’t be coming. Night falls, and they return to the business of keeping their boat afloat. When morning comes, the captain suggests that they try again for shore before they become too tired. The boat capsizes in their attempts to reach shore due to rough seas, so the men must try to swim to shore....   [tags: survival, nature, nurture] 1120 words
(3.2 pages)
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The Correspondent as Spokesperson and Mediator in Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat" - The Correspondent: the Spokesperson and the Mediator in Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat” Stephen Crane’s “The Open Boat” has long been acclaimed as a fascinating exemplar of Naturalism, generating many studies that range from the indifference of Nature to the “psychological growth of the men through the experience” (466). The psychological growth happens to every man on the boat, yet is mostly depicted through the voice of the Correspondent and in the form of his questioning and contemplating their desperate situation....   [tags: American Literature] 825 words
(2.4 pages)
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Naturalism in Stephan Crane and Jack London's Works - ... Maggie represents an individual unmarked by their physical surroundings. The author stereotypes and characterizes the persona of Maggie to demonstrate the overall influence of our environment and the unpleasant conditions within the inner-city. Stephan Crane illustrates Maggie and Jimmy as opposites and the parents are portrayed as drunken, unsuccessful hypocrites and unfit role models. Although Maggie is repeatedly abused mentally and physically, she continuously assembles the bits and pieces of her existence regardless of being “in a worn and sorry state.” Crane utilizes several different manners to identify the evils that persisted in city slums....   [tags: Maggie, Law of LIfe, Open Boat] 1274 words
(3.6 pages)
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"Sister Carrie" by Theodore Dreiser and Stephen Crane´s "The Open Boat," Examples of American Naturalist Literature - ... The writers who use naturalism show that nature is uncaring of human life, the universe seems to have no order, man will look for signs in the universe, and man seems to have no real purpose in nature. Stephen Crane brings his story, “The Open Boat,” to life by using all four characteristics. In his descriptions of the sea, Crane portrays nature as uncaring, unforgiving, and relentless. During the story, he states, "A singular disadvantage of the sea lies in the fact that after successfully surmounting one wave you discover that there is another behind it just as important and just as nervously anxious to do something effective in the way of swamping boats." The sea refuses to relent in...   [tags: Realism, Status, Authors] 952 words
(2.7 pages)
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Man and Nature in Stephen Crane's The Blue Hotel and The Open Boat - Man and Nature in The Blue Hotel and The Open Boat      Stephen Crane uses a massive, ominous stove, sprawled out in a tiny room and burning with "god-like violence," as a principal metaphor to communicate his interpretation of the world. Full of nearly restrained energy, the torrid stove is a symbol of the burning, potentially eruptive earth to which humans "cling" and of which they are a part. As a literary naturalist, Crane interpreted reality from a Darwinian perspective, and saw the earth driven by adamant natural laws, violent and powerful laws which are often hostile to humans and their societies, and he conceived of humans as accidents, inhabiting a harsh, irrational, dan...   [tags: Blue Hotel Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
2661 words
(7.6 pages)
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Choices and Responsibility in London's To Build a Fire and Crane's The Open Boat - Choices and Responsibility in London's To Build a Fire and Crane's The Open Boat Naturalism portrays humans' control over their actions and fate as limited and determined by the natural world, including their very humanity. The freedom described by Jean-Paul Sartre results in all individuals having the ability to make present choices independently. Despite the fatalism illustrated in naturalism, the characters in London's 'To Build a Fire' and Crane's 'The Open Boat' are ultimately responsible for their choices and consequences of their choices....   [tags: Comparison Compare Contrast Essays]
:: 2 Works Cited
1644 words
(4.7 pages)
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The narrative of the Olive Boat - One object in the Palace Museum in Taipei classified as a “curio,” is a small light brown oblong object that upon closer inspection is a detailed boat complete with cargo and a crew carved from an olive stone. This boat provides insight into the interaction between artist and view as well as demonstrating some traits typical of Chinese art. First, the object itself provides a narrative of Chinese boast and offers insight into how this object was meant to be viewed. Second, the material of the object is unusual and suggests the skill and intellect of the artist as well as mirroring traditional Chinese thought about material....   [tags: object landscape, palace museum, chinese boast]
:: 4 Works Cited
1324 words
(3.8 pages)
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Bumper Boat Fiasco - Bumper boats are stupid. Or so I thought. A complete waste of time and money. Seriously, who wants to buzz around in a poorly constructed piece of scrap metal surrounded by rubber for clueless little children. These were my thoughts until one of the weirdest and most hilarious events occurred a few summers ago. Then my opinion of bumper boats immediately changed. It was the summer of 2006 in late July after my sixth grade year at Harrold Middle School. My parents surprised my brothers and me by telling us that our family, including my grandparents and aunt’s family, would be traveling to Cook Forest in Clarion, PA....   [tags: Personal Experience, Autobiography] 1259 words
(3.6 pages)
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Forces in a Rolling Boat - Every boat has a degree of roll from which she can no longer recover. Two forces are locked in combat for a ship about to capsize: the downward push of gravity and the upward lift of buoyancy. Gravity is combined with the weight of the vessel and everything in board-crew, cargo, fishing gear- seeking the center of the earth. Buoyancy is the force of all the enclosed air in the hull trying to rise above water level. On a evenly balanced and stable ship, these two forces are equal and cancel out each other, but all of this changes when a boat gets shoved over her side....   [tags: Physics Boating] 385 words
(1.1 pages)
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Sinking Boat Saves the Day  - Sinking Boat Saves the Day Andrew and Ollie are two sixteen year old boys, it is their summer holidays at the moment; and they have been enjoying it to the limits in the small town of Polperro where they live on the southern Cornish coast. They had spent the majority of the summer out at sea in Andrews’s dads’ motor boat catching mackerel. But it all had to stop one week because of the typical English weather- there had been severe storms in Cornwall, and the sea has been extremely rough....   [tags: Papers] 1366 words
(3.9 pages)
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Facing the Winds of the Open Sea - Thump thump. I have been repeating back handsprings nonstop for thirty minutes, putting continuous pressure on my wrists, yet my body felt that I could recap these efforts for hours on end. The feeling of delight was monumental and dulled the splintering impulses my nerves were sending; after months of practice to obtain my back handspring, the day was finally here and I was overcome with ecstasy. I threw myself backwards to make myself comprehend that this was not a dream, much like pinching oneself....   [tags: Personal Ambition] 652 words
(1.9 pages)
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Themes in The Boat by Alistair MacLeod - “Two roads diverged in a wood and I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.” At some point in life one is faced with a decision which will define the future, but only time will tell whether or not the choice was right or wrong. The Boat by Alistair MacLeod demonstrates that an individual should make their own decisions in life, be open to new experiences and changes, and that there is no way to obtain something, without sacrificing something else. The story describes the protagonist who is coming of age as torn between the two worlds which he loves equally, represented by his mother and his father....   [tags: Decisions, Life, Choices] 1028 words
(2.9 pages)
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The Facinating Competetion of Dragon Boat Racing - ... It’s an amazing sight to see, and even more experience. Now let’s go back a little about some history of the two sports. It is believed that dragon boating originated along the Yangtze River of the southern region of China 2,500 years ago. There are various accounts as to the history of the sport but no reliable sources can be found. Although the main underlying theme of the history comes back to the sacrificial nature of the culture to the dragon deity to either provide agricultural prosperity or justice....   [tags: team, sport, rowing] 781 words
(2.2 pages)
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Realization in "the Open Boat" - "The Open Boat" by Stephen Crane is a factual account of his adventures at sea, or as he declares, "the Experience of Four Men from the Sunk Steamer COMMODORE" (48). He and three other men--the ship's captain, oiler, and cook--escape the sinking steamer in a small dinghy, and spend thirty wretched hours on the rough sea before reaching the Florida coast. Despite undergoing these events firsthand, Crane narrates the story in third person, indicating his presence in the dinghy through the character of the correspondent....   [tags: American Literature] 1462 words
(4.2 pages)
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Stephen Crane "the Open Boat" - In Stephen Crane's "The Open Boat," the four men underwent an experience in which they endured the forces of the sea that caused them to change their perception of nature and ultimately brought them to see the conflict between humanity and the natural world. In the beginning, faced with the restless sea, the four men felt that outside help existed somewhere. The cook was the most certain that they would be rescued. In his argument with the correspondent, the cook told him, "There is a house of refuge...and as soon as they see us they'll come off in their boat and pick us up" (NA, 358)....   [tags: American Literature] 498 words
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Helen Keller's Amazing Description of New York City - ... It is possible that people may have told her about the beauty of the city, which is why she felt the need to experience city first handily. New York City definitely has a way of attracted all kinds of people, weather, old, young, blind, seeing and etc because of all of liveliness and the amount of exposure one could get there. One of Keller’s experiences that she will never forget is the boat trip. The trip took all day and circumvented New York (Keller, Helen 506). Her teacher, sister, niece accompanied Keller, and Mr....   [tags: blind, deaf, open-minded]
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Physics of Self Bailing Boats and How I Built One - The Basic Principle behind a Self Bailing Boat Actually the idea is quite simple really, it consists of a floor above the hull with open drain plugs in the rear of the boat and above the water line. By this simple method as water comes in to the boat it will drain right out of the back. If too much weight is in the boat then water will simply come in through the drain holes. This is no worry to me because I can always just put some plugs in the drain holes when carrying a heavy load. I made the decision to build the aluminum skiff 17ft long and strong enough to hold an outboard motor with a mass of 141kg (approx....   [tags: physics boat boating ship] 733 words
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The Pelagic Zone - ... This layer covers 1000-4000 meters deep in the ocean. When it gets this deep, besides preying on other animals in the layer, the animals must rely on detritus that sinks down from the higher up layers. Detritus is basically waste that will sink down. Such as whale carcasses and other larger carcassses that are not fully consumed. Some animals found in this subzone would be; some fish, mollusks, jellyfish, angler fish, snake dragonfish, and vampire squid. Rarely, sperm whales will dive this deep in hunt of giant squids....   [tags: Open Ocean, deeper tenches, sea] 1107 words
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Open Borders are Harmful to the United States - The immigration debate has been in the news a great deal recently. Most of the attention has been focused on the illegal immigrants entering our country from Mexico, mostly Hispanics and Latinos. Uncontrolled immigration is harmful to the United States. It harms the American worker and it harms the American economy. The open borders are a threat to national security because terrorists, smugglers, and drug dealers can also freely cross the border. These key facts cannot be ignored and outweigh the claims that race and ethnicity are part of the debate....   [tags: Open Immigration] 1685 words
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The Other Boat - The Other Boat Who am I. Why do I do what I do. When can I break the rules of society without being guilty. In the unique agony of seeking understanding, acceptance, and love, these several questions echo poignantly throughout human history. For all people these introspective problems—while difficult—desperately need answers, as answers to these questions dictate the choice to stay within the bounds of accepted ethics or to step out. The importance and difficulty of finding good answers to these questions intensifies for atheists and agnostics, since they must formulate answers with the full responsibility for their conclusions resting on their own shoulders....   [tags: Other Boat Edward Morgan Forster]
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Potential and Deceit in Saki's "The Open Window" - Through subtle and discrete methods, Saki implies vast amounts of truth about society. How at ease and dependant one can become – that one neglects to see the immature and fraudulent intentions underneath – throughout his short story “The Open Window”. Saki’s story which has a character whose art of deception, which takes in the form of maiming the real meaning of the open window and disguising it in her lies, to the point where her victim’s gullibility takes a toll open his well being is a clear and distinct representation of one’s malevolent intents....   [tags: Open Window, Saki, ] 724 words
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Open Source Development - 1. Introduction This research project will explain in a clear manor what Open Source Development (OSD) is, the history and objectives of OSD, and how it is applicable to both home users and businesses. This project will also show the companies which use and develop Open Source and why Open Source is so important not only to businesses and people at home, but to us as computer scientists and how it will lead us further, farther, and deeper into technological advances in the software industry enabling us to grow and build a better future for computers and Development....   [tags: Open Source Development]
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Security Plan: Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) - Introduction This security plan will deal with the risk associated with massive open online courses (MOOCs.) Several security issues are involved with MOOCs. By their very definition MOOCs are course open and free, (Herold,2013) thus making them a security risk from outside the district but also open to abuse from within the network framework. MOOCs generally free and open to the public at large, (Herold, 2013) this raises many concerns about data breaching and untested resources on the district network....   [tags: open, free, abuse, policy, network]
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Symbol, Allusion, and Myth in Irving Layton's Rhine Boat Trip - Symbol, Allusion, and Myth in Irving Layton's Rhine Boat Trip        "...haunted/by the ghosts of Jewish mothers/looking for their ghostly Children" (Layton). Though physical evidence of the Holocaust is now slightly limited, as time tends to destroy the tangible, the cry for justice and the remembrance of systematic genocide by a sadistic people enacting ignorant dogma will ring indefinitely throughout the world. Humanity will always be guilty of the atrocities that it instigates. Irving Layton, in his poem, Rhine Boat Trip, depicts the eternal evidence of the Nazi Crime, a stain of culpability that is reducible from all who have witnessed it....   [tags: Rhine Boat Trip Essays] 880 words
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Open Source Software - Open Source Software Ever since computer programmers began collaborating online to build software applications, the "open source" movement has been developing into a serious rival to the multinational software companies. Since the term was coined in the late 90s, open source has rapidly matured from an egalitarian approach to software design into a movement whose practices underpin the internet....   [tags: Software Open Source IT] 1695 words
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The Harsh Reality of Sports Management: “Open: Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black” by John Feinstein - “Open: Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black”, by John Feinstein, sets the primary basis of the harsh reality of the sports management field. Sport management includes the functions of planning, organizing, leading and evaluating within the context of an organization. (Masteralexis, 2009: 26) In this book, Feinstein clearly depicts a real life story of a few men who saw potential in a somewhat run down golf course, and how they used the aspects of sport management to run a successful U.S. Open Golf Championship....   [tags: Open: Inside the Ropes at Bethpage Black, John Fei] 1098 words
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The Rape of Women in Draupadi, by Mahasweta Devi, and Open It,”by Saadat Hasan Manto - The Rape of Women in “Draupadi,” by Mahasweta Devi, and “Open It,” by Saadat Hasan Manto Where there is war, there is the rape and abuse of women. From the Trojan War to the Middle East conflict, rape has been a tactic of war. Rape is commonly viewed by society as a symbol of female degradation, female submission, and the stripping of honor and humanity. In the stories “Draupadi,” by Mahasweta Devi, and “Open It,” by Saadat Hasan Manto, the rape of women is a common theme. In Manto’s “Open It,” a young girl, Sakina, is raped by young men of her community, while in Devi’s “Draupadi,” a tribal rebel is raped by authorities of the state....   [tags: Draupadi Open Devi Manto Essays]
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Analysis of The Boat by Alistar MacLeod - ... In the story, the father is obligated to provide for his family as well as to continue the fishing tradition that was inherited from his own father. The mother emphasizes the boat and it’s significance when she consistently asked the father “ How did things go in the boat today” since tradition was paramount to the mother. However, the father often feels controlled and imprisoned by the boat since it is the only asset that provides the family with food and financial ability. When MacLeod writes “ as he lay there with the brass chains on his wrist,” he suggests that the father was chained to a life of restraint that was forced upon him since it was tradition and expected for every male in...   [tags: Dreams, Desires, Tradition]
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The Found Boat by Alice Munro - ... Eva and Carol are the protagonists of the story, while Frank, Bud, and Clayton are the antagonists. Eva and Carol were the friends that initially found the boat. “ It was a boat or part of one. Old rowboats with most on one side ripped out, the board that had been the seat just dangling. It was pushed up among the branches, lying on what would have been its side, if it had a side, the prow caught high” (355). The boys are the ones that took it upon themselves to take the boat home and to repair it....   [tags: teenagers, freedom] 621 words
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Can A Cardboard Boat Float - As surprising as it may seem, one of the most common household items, cardboard, can be used to construct a boat. Building a cardboard boat has become a fun activity that anyone can take part in. Towns and schools hold annual cardboard boat regattas, judging the entrants on speed, design, and creativity. In New Richmond, Ohio there is even a cardboard boat museum. These special boats are more than just a box thrown into water; they are designed using elements of engineering and physics to make them not only water ready, but fast and durable....   [tags: history, stone age, log boats]
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Can a Cardboard Boat Float? - ... in their boats, known as longships. These ships were the main naval vessel of the Scandinavians. Their boats were built for speed due to their shallow draft hull design. During that time these boats were very intimidating. Today, however, we have boats that have reached over 300 miles per hour and ships that are 1,600 ft. long. After hearing that you can make a boat out of cardboard you may be wondering why boats even float. The reason a boat can float, is based on the gravitational force and the buoyancy force....   [tags: incorporating topics learned in class ] 838 words
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The Boat: The Pursuit of Self- Fulfilment - . In the short story The Boat, written by Canadian author Alistair Macleod, the main storyline revolves around the idea of self-fulfillment and the factors that affect one’s path to achieving it. The story bases itself off of a families pursuit of self-fulfillment within each individual and the limitations that obstructs their opportunities of achieving it. The main character, the Son, is faced with an internal conflict between choosing what his aspirations in life will truly will be. Two very influential characters that affect his decisions include the mother, who is very strong willed in what she believed, and his Father....   [tags: Alistair Macleod, story analysis] 1433 words
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The Boat, by Alistair Macleod - A household is a precious and sensitive system of a group. Everyone has a role and responsibilities and even if someone took a sliver of more than the rest the balance could be broken. In the short-story “The Boat” written by Alistair MacLeod, the mother controls decisions in the house and abuses them even if they are not for the better of the house. She refuses to accept the daughter’s gifts, she discourages her family towards getting a better education and she married their father and pressured him to be a sailor....   [tags: Abuse of Power, Family]
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Short Story: The Boat - ... Although obviously irritated by the intrusion into its watery domain by the fired pistol rounds, it never lost track of why it had been attracted to our boat in the first place, an easy meal that’s why, supplied by a large shoal of gaily colored smaller fish, who were greedily feasting on a cloud of debris coming from the propellers as two of the Zippo’s crew hacked away with battle knifes at the seaborne trash, which had screwed itself tightly into a rock hard ball on each of the propellers....   [tags: royal marines, china, tempest]
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The Door is Open - The Door is Open The concept of what other people think of us either becomes our whole world or becomes something we try to resist to become our own person. My first memory was when I was three years old in the family room of my first house. It was a three bedroom house in Parkersburg, West Virginia. My mom had just left the room to finish cooking dinner for the night. I was in the room with my dad who was recording me from across the relatively empty room. For some reason the way I remember this is from the perspective of my dad on the other side of the camera....   [tags: Autobiography, Personal Experience] 1012 words
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The Importance of Traditions in A Rose For Emily and The Boat - The loss of tradition is a sub theme in both short stories, A Rose for Emily by William Faulkner and The Boat by Alistair Macleod. In the former, the loss of tradition is seen by Miss Emily losing her way of life in the old South. In the latter, the boat is the tradition for the story. The tradition is lost as outsiders come in and the daughters leave with the effeminate strangers and abandon the community and the cherished way of life of their mother. However, this tradition represented by Emily’s house and the boat gradually disappears in both stories....   [tags: Compare and Contrast] 920 words
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Considerations for the Design and Fabrication of a Boat Propeller - ... Material selection and corrosion protection would be simple if all that needed to be considered was the environmental conditions, however the operational conditions must also be considered. Operational Conditions There are two key operational conditions that must be considered in the design of a propeller, these are pitting and operating time. Pitting is a very important consideration as it is the starting block for corrosion damage on a propeller blade. Boat propellers transmit power by rotating in the water to provide thrust; as such it is subjected to a high amount of revolutions per minute....   [tags: corrosion, materials, maintenance] 1450 words
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My Family Needed a Reliable Boat - For islanders boating is a necessity. For sportspersons, vacationers and outdoors enthusiasts, recreational watersports is the reason most visitors come to the area. My observation is that summer boating, and pleasure craft activity has become more popular with each passing year. I’ve not only watched, but I have also been an active participant in exploring the river. I’ve watched fishing boats and pleasure craft darting in and out of the channels between and around the myriad of nearby islands....   [tags: islander, sports, activities] 967 words
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Open to Access - “A survey conducted by the Evans D. Donaldson Institute found that six out of ten Americans” have had a ‘personal experience’ with adoption (Dudley 1). With such a high percentage, it is important for one to understand the issues entwined with open and closed adoptions. In the United States today, closed adoptions are associated with secrecy and shame, leading to long-term emotional problems for children and parents. The basic idea of open adoptions allows the child to know his or her birth parents' identities....   [tags: Adoption]
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How Much Weight Can Float Your Boat? - How Much Weight Can Your Boat Float. How much is your boat able to hold. A boat can only hold so much weight before it starts to sink. Too much weight on a boat can cause the boat to sway back and forth or roll over. It is very important to make sure that the load of your cargo is balanced or the chance of capsizing a boat is greatly increased. When weight is added to a vessel, the boat will start to lower in the water, but it will not sink because of the shape of the hull. Many boats are designed with a flat-bottom because they are able to hold more in their cargo hold....   [tags: vessel, hull, water]
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How to Boat on the Chesapeake - How to Boat on the Chesapeake An experienced mariner knows that boating can be a very relaxing and rewarding sport that anyone can enjoy. He also knows that there is much more involved in the sport than simply getting into a boat and sailing off on the sun-glistened waters of the Chesapeake Bay. Unfortunately, most people who are new to the sport don' t realize all that is involved in boating, sometimes until it is too late. By taking the time to learn some basic information, picking up some important charts and publications, and buying a valuable marine radio, anyone can enjoy boating safely....   [tags: Expository Process Essays] 539 words
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Show Boat Changes Its Wicked Stage - ... The ideals, sentiments, and speech contained within Show Boat are American-especially the way the characters talk with each other and act around each other and react to each other. For example, the way the characters speak with each other is American. They all have a southern American accent. The dialect that is given to the black characters is stereotypical of that time. Even the title of the songs “Can’t Help Lovin’ Dat Man” and “Ol’ Man River” use that dialect (Block 28). The ideals are American, including miscegenation being a crime and how some of the white characters look down on the black characters and some of the black characters do not feel as if they are as important as the w...   [tags: musical, American style, theater] 1721 words
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Literary Success in Alistair MacLeod´s The Boat - ... However we are soon sent back in time as he recalls his childhood living in a minuscule fishing town. It is an interesting technique, especially as the story develops and we learn about his conflict. As we see his struggle and his fathers struggle, we have it in the back of our minds that he leaves his life in the fishing town to move to the city. We also know it advanced that he is in a bad place and that he has unhappy memories about his past. As he discusses his past we are introduced to his mother....   [tags: mood, theme, setting, impressive, word] 650 words
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The Importance of An Open Mind - Thesis Statement In the book Inherit The Wind, by Jerome Lawrence and Robert E. Lee it shows that having an open mind is very important. That, even though your life (or criminal record) depends on it, comprehending the other person's point is just as important as making your own. Those who do NOT possess an open mind l lack a crucial part of their personality that makes them hear the other person out. Open Mindedness may be expressed in a number of ways, but this book proves that those who are perceptive in ANY way progress rapidly compared to those who decline anybody’s beliefs but their own....   [tags: Literary Analysis] 814 words
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The Great Tuna Boat Chase and Massacre case - The Great Tuna Boat Chase and Massacre Case has Ecuador claiming that the United States is in violation of its 200-mile territorial sea. From it’s inception, Ecuador had accepted the customary three mile limit as the demarcation of its territorial waters. However, after 130 years, Juan Valdez achieved power in 1952. Under his regime, he proclaimed that the three mile boundary was never meant to be considered a fixed and unalterable boundary, and that historical practices as well as the natural features of the area justified a 200-mile territorial sea....   [tags: Conflict, Territorial Waters, Ecuador] 1255 words
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An Open Invitation to Delroy's World - An Open Invitation to Delroy’s World Delroy grew up in Brooklyn, New York in the nineteen sixties and is an automotive technician by trade. He is a successful owner and operator of an auto repair business in Fort Lauderdale, Florida. In addition to that, he is a self-taught musician and singer whose forte is playing the bass guitar. The door to his music sanctuary is usually closed to everyone, but me and the members of his band. However, today he has chosen to extend an open invitation to anyone who would like to explore his world of music....   [tags: Personal Description, New York] 737 words
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