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Native American Sign Language - Native American Sign Language Very basic, elementary and logical characteristics made the Native American Sign Language the world's most easily learned language. It was America's first and only universal language. The necessity for intercommunication between Indian tribes having different vocal speech developed gesture speech or sign language (Clark; pg. 11). Although there is no record or era dating the use of sign language, American Indian people have communicated with Indian Sign Language for thousands of years....   [tags: Native Americans Sign Language Communication] 1455 words
(4.2 pages)
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Native Language Communication - Language is a universal form of communication. Language is the way people get their ideas, emotions, and thoughts across to the world, and people. But what about a person's native language. A native language is a person's blueprint for their voice. Native languages seperate the human race. What if languages were decreased to just English, and no another language exisited. People would mirror each other, and have no idea of diversity. People would be in shambles. There are so many different languages in the world to limit people to one language....   [tags: Language] 1471 words
(4.2 pages)
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Native Language - Language is universal. People voice their ideas, emotions, and thoughts across to the world through language. Multitudes of people across the country speak a varierty of languages. However, a foreigner is reduced to their native language, and sometimes has difficulties mainstreaming English into their dialect. A native language is a foreigner's blueprint for the world to hear. Native language gives homage to a foreigner's culture and home life. Native tongues open doors for education and job opprutunities....   [tags: Language] 971 words
(2.8 pages)
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Native Language - Language is universal. People voice their ideas, emotions, and thoughts across to the world through language. But, how does people’s native language play a role. A native language is a person's blueprint for their voice. Native language gives homage to people’s culture and home life. It can open doors to education and careers. Native language surrounds people, and molds people. It is plastered in books, and street signs, and helps to recollect their native country. What if language decreased to just English, and no another language existed....   [tags: Language] 989 words
(2.8 pages)
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Pidgins: No One's Native Language - A pidgin is a language which has no native speakers and was developed as a mean of communication between people who do not have a common language. A pidgin is no one’s native language. Pidgins seem particularly likely to arise when two groups with different language are communicating in a place where there is also a third dominant language. For example, on Caribbean slave plantations in the seventeenth and the eighteenth centuries, West African people were forcefully separated from others who used the same language to reduce the risk of them plotting to escape or rebel....   [tags: communication alternatives]
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524 words
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Positive and Negative Evidence in Language Learning - Grammar is traditionally subdivided into two areas of study – morphology and syntax. Morphology is the study of how words are formed out of smaller units, syntax studies the way in which phrases and sentences are structured out of words. Traditional grammar describes the syntax of a language in terms of a taxonomy (classification). This approach is based on the assumption that phrases and sentences are built up of a series of constituents, each of which belongs to a specific grammatical category and serves a specific grammatical function....   [tags: grammar, native language, syntax]
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Learning The Native Language - Learning The Native Language Most of the child language acquisition theories all have the same general idea, that language is acquired through repetition and imitation. The behaviourist approach states ‘that children learn to speak by imitating the language structures they hear’. Covering both aspects of the statement at the beginning which is ‘hearing English and trying to speak it yourself are the only tools’. The interactive approach states ‘recent studies have shown the importance of interaction’ which again is the tools of listening and speaking in order to acquire the language....   [tags: Papers] 883 words
(2.5 pages)
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My Native Language - My Native Language Is your native language something you take for granted. Well, for me it has been a struggle — a struggle with history, politics, society, and myself. Yet something guided me through it. I don't know what you heard about my native land — Belarus. For most of the world it is a new country, as four centuries of severe Russian assimilation devastated Belarusian culture. But some of it managed to survive, mostly in the villages. This shaped my biography. Although I was born in a city in the western part of then Byelorussian SSR1, the first six years of my life I spent in a village with my grandparents....   [tags: Russian Personal Narrative Communication Essays] 1340 words
(3.8 pages)
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Does A Second Language In Early Life Affect a Native Language? - Language acquisition is the process whereby children acquire the capacity to identify and comprehend a language either native or a second language. Most children learn a language through observation and listening and from there, they learn to copy what they hear and pronounce it. Many children learn to speak through sounds and vocabulary by imitating what the people around them, speak. Children are exposed to a language and this exposure helps them to be able to interact with the rest of the people....   [tags: PreProduction Stage, Sound Distinctions]
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1822 words
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Language Loss: Native American Languages - If one walks through one of the large cities’ streets in our country. They will hear and experience a variety of languages. Our history and tradition of being a land of immigrants is reflected in the languages we speak. This means that the USA is home to a vast number of languages, one would be hard pressed to find a language that is not spoken in the U.S. The official list as the number of languages spoken in the United States go as high as 322. The most spoken and prominent languages in the country being English, Spanish, and French....   [tags: tradition, history, immigrants, teaching]
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2009 words
(5.7 pages)
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Deaf Like Me by Thomas S. Spradley and James P. Spradley - Have you ever felt like there was nothing that you can do for your child. In this book, Deaf Like Me, by Thomas S. Spradley and James P. Spradley, I can see the journey that Lynn’s parents took to get her help. (Spradley & Spradley, 1978). This book was an excellent read. I really liked the way that they described the ways they tried to help Lynn to understand the world around her. The book, is a great asset for any family that might be unexpectedly put into a situation that they know nothing about such as a deaf child....   [tags: sign language, native language]
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Attitudes Towards the Navajo Tribe's Language and Culture - In this day and age, and with every passing day, there are numerous languages succumbing to extinction, falling into disuse and anonymity; being forever lost to the winds of time. But as they say, "Every cloud has its silver lining," the silver lining in this case is the increase and rise in awareness and efforts being undertaken to preserve, revitalize, and revive these languages that are not yet lost to us. Something that is revitalized is defined as "being given new life or vigor to," and should we abide by this definition, it is pleasing to see that numerous fit in this criterion; the criteria of being revitalized....   [tags: Preservation Of Language, Native American History]
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2105 words
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Bilingual Education: Improving One’s Life - Bilingual Education: Improving O0ne’s Life Currently there are about 6,000 languages (Language Loss). “10,000 years ago, there may have been 12,000 languages (Cancio).” In the next century about ninety percent of all world languages could go extinct, because “languages are no longer being learnt by children” (Law). Some of these languages are also being lost because people move to the United States in search for a better life. Another cause would be that “the United States is failing to graduate enough students with expertise in foreign languages” (Saiz, and Zoido 523)....   [tags: Native Language, Second Language, Education]
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1061 words
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Themes of Language and Racial Identity in Native Speaker, By Chang-Rae Lee - Chang-Rae Lee’s Native Speaker expresses prominent themes of language and racial identity. Chang-Rae Lee focuses on the struggles that Asian Americans have to face and endure in American society. He illustrates and shows readers throughout the novel of what it really means to be native of America; that true nativity of a person does not simply entail the fact that they are from a certain place, but rather, the fluency of a language verifies one’s defense of where they are native. What is meant by possessing nativity of America would be one’s citizenship and legality of the country....   [tags: Chang-Rae Lee]
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2640 words
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We Real Cool a Poem by Gwendoly Brooks - We Real Cool “We Real Cool” is a poem that was written by poet Gwendolyn Brooks in the year of 1959. This poem states that the black young people in the United States went through to make a clear definition of themselves and tried to seek their values in the late fifties and early sixties, young kids knowing they are different from the society, so they started their abandonment from a young age, they give up school because they know they cannot be accept as other white kids, they were caught in things as rape, murder and robbery because that's the only thing the now to express their anger....   [tags: black young boys, native language]
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The effectiveness of the Non Native Speaking Teacher - Introduction With the number of English users around the word reaching a probable 2 billion (Crystal 2003), it can be confidently stated that the English language has achieved the status of the world’s lingua franca (Wardhaugh, 2006). The increase in the use of the language has led to an increase in the demand for English language courses (Nunan 2003). Therefore, this has also led to an increase in the demand for English language teachers. These teachers can be both Native Speaking Teachers (NST) and Non-Native Speaking Teachers (NNST)....   [tags: Language]
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1976 words
(5.6 pages)
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Making Chat Activities with Native Speakers Meaningful for EFL Learners - Before reading the text “Making chat activities with native speakers meaningful for EFL Learners” by Jo Mynard as we know our current world, plenty of technologies and inventions are being invented all the time. It is comfortable to live in this modern age. These technologies were invented in order to facilitate our life, especially in communication. Also, teaching and learning English now are quite influenced by technologies. English can be learnt from many mediums, such as CDs, cassettes, and especially, the Internet....   [tags: Language ] 1096 words
(3.1 pages)
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Resurgence of the Hawaiian Language - No matter where you go in Hawaiʻi, the Hawaiian language, or ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi, is sure to be found. Whether in expressions like “aloha” or “mahalo”, songs like our state anthem “Hawaiʻi Ponoʻī”, or in the names of the places we live, work and play, like “Kealakekua”, “Keālia” or “Waiākea”, Hawaiian is a part of our daily life. Today, you can watch Hawaiian-language programs on ʻŌiwi TV or hear ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi on radio stations like KAPA, KHBC or KWXX. And, with Hawaiian being an official language of the state of Hawaiʻi, and with the number of speakers and learners of ʻōlelo Hawaiʻi having increased tenfold between 2000 and 2010, it is imperative for the State of Hawaiʻi and the Department of...   [tags: Native, Hawaii] 899 words
(2.6 pages)
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Language Preservation of the Coushatta Peoples - The Contemporary Issues in Native American Culture provides a lot of varied topics and interests. In this paper, the main issue will be the topic of tribal language preservation. How tribes are able to raise money to enhance language efforts, how tribes are working to preserve the language, and how tribes are using language to maintain cultural awareness and identity will be discussed. Tribes are working hard to preserve their language through many different methods. For example, Rindels (n.d.) explains that tribes are using technology to be able to save their languages....   [tags: Native American culture]
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1302 words
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Adolf Hitler Rises to Power in Europe While the U.S. Recruits Native Americans - ... The Japanese intelligence experts broke every code of the US forces, which made them one-step ahead in combat. The United States thought that the Japanese and the Axis powers would not be able to decipher a novel code if it would consist of Native American terms. The use of the Navajo language to create a code during World War II was the idea of Philip Johnston, the son of William and Margaret Johnston who were Protestant missionaries to the Navajo (Holm 71). Johnston was born and raised in the reservation; he was also the one of very few Americans who could speak the Navajo language precisely (Aaseng 17)....   [tags: navajo, world war, language] 1197 words
(3.4 pages)
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Repression of the Native American Society - Intro: Ever since the first white settlers arrived at America in 1492, the Native American population has been seen as a minority. People who weren’t as good as the new “white” settlers and unfit to live the new found land of America. As America expanded westward with the Louisiana Purchase and war with Mexico that ceded the south west to the U.S. as a result of the treaty of the 1803 Guadaplupe-Hildago Treaty, white settlers continued to move westward. They found rich fertile land, but there was a problem....   [tags: Native Americans] 1185 words
(3.4 pages)
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The Official Language of the United Nations - “Bilingualism for the individual is fine, but not for a country”, claims S.I Hayakawa in his article “Bilingualism in America”, published in USA Today in 1989. A language is a systematic means of communication. It is used to express ourselves and communicate with others. More than 300 languages are spoken in the United States but English is one of the common bonds among the Americans of all backgrounds. English is the language of freedom, commerce and opportunity around the world. English is the official language of 51 nations and 27 states in the United States of America....   [tags: Language ]
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Second Language Acquisition in Childhood - Children acquire their native language, which fall within a wide range of languages, at a very early stage of development. During development, a child begins to show signs of verbal communication, usually starting out as cooing, babbling, recognizable words, and later two or more word sentences. This occurrence is also seen in the development of second languages. Second language acquisition is the study of how second languages are typically developed. The process of acquiring our native language is very similar and influential to the development of a second language....   [tags: Language]
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Making English The Official Language - The United States is made up of many different ethic groups. These groups vary from Latinos, Asian American, African American, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and etc. These ethnic groups come into America speaking many different languages. However, many people are still surprised to learn that the United States has no official language. Many assume that English is the official language of the United States. Despite all the effort over the years, the United States has no official language. Because the United States has no official language, it is suffering with substantial costs....   [tags: Language]
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Native American Spiritual Beliefs - I have decided to discuss the topic of Spirituality in Native Americans. To address this topic, I will first discuss what knowledge I have gained about Native Americans. Then I will discuss how this knowledge will inform my practice with Native Americans. To conclude, I will talk about ethical issues, and dilemmas that a Social Worker might face working with Native American people. In approaching this topic, I first realized that I need to look up some general information about Native Americans in the United States....   [tags: Native American]
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2347 words
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Language Acquisition and Acculturation - Language is a medium of communication and a carrier of culture because all that people know about their origin is communicated to them using language. In most cases mother tongues are suitable in expressing ones way of life. The native language is the best in expressing basic societal affairs. Language is the key medium of communication and it should be used in its simplest form because the simpler the language the easier the communication (Diyanni 633-639). ‘Mother Tongue’ a story by Amy Tan tries to take us through the different events one should change the manner in which he or she uses language with the listeners....   [tags: Language ]
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Learning A Second Language - Introduction Learning a language is quite possibly one of the most difficult and time- consuming endeavors a person could ever undertake. Therefore, it comes as no surprise, that a limited number of second languages are taught in schools across the western world, and languages are sometimes failed to be passed on to children growing up in a different country than their parents did. Even in Canada, an officially bilingual country, only 15% of Canadians speak English and one unofficial language (Statistics Canada 2008) and in America, only 21% of the population is versed in two languages (Logan, 2003)....   [tags: Language]
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1866 words
(5.3 pages)
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How Children Learn Language: Neurobiological Insights Into Language Acquisition During Childhood. - Language is perceived as the way humans communicate through the use of spoken words or sign action, it involves particular system and styles in which we interact with one another (Oxford 2009). Possessing this ability to communicate through the use of language is thought to be a quintessential human trait (Pinker 2000). Learning a language, know as language acquisition, is something that every child does successfully within a few years. It is the development by which they acquire the ability to perceive, produce and use words to understand and communicate....   [tags: Language ]
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English: The Official Language of the United States - The United States is made up of many different ethic groups. These groups vary from Latinos, Asian American, African American, Pacific Islanders, Native Americans, and etc. These ethnic groups come into America speaking many different languages. However, many people are still surprised to learn that the United States has no official language. Many assume that English is the official language of the United States. But despite efforts over the years, the United States has no official language. Because the United States has no official language, it is suffering with large costs....   [tags: Language ]
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1323 words
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Critical Age in First Language Acquisition - 1.0 Introduction Language is a set of arbitrary symbols which used for communication. Children will be taught or learn their first language from birth. Sometimes the term native language and the term mother tongue are used to indicate the term first language. Possessing a language is the quintessentially human trait: all normal humans speak, no nonhuman animal does.(Pinker, 2005) Nonetheless, learning a first language is something every child does successfully, in a matter of a few years and without the need for formal lessons....   [tags: Language ]
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1878 words
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Who Are English Language Learner Students? - Who Are English Language Learner Students. The No Child Left Behind (NCLB) uses the acronym Limited English Proficient (LEP) and labels an English-Language Learner (ELL) as an individual who “is between the ages of 3 to 21 years, has enrolled or is preparing to enroll in elementary or secondary school, was not born in the United State or English is not the native language, comes from a background in which the English language has had a considerable impact on an individual’s English Language Proficiency, comes from an environment where English is not the individuals primary language and has had prior or previous difficulties in speaking, writing, reading, or understanding the English language...   [tags: Language ]
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1958 words
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Now It Is My Turn To Stand: Defining Yourself Through Land, Oral Tradition and Language - How does one define oneself. Is it through land, oral tradition, or language. If we were to ask Simon Ortiz, one of the leading Native American writers, he would answer, to an extent, all of the above. In agreement to Ortiz, Kieu also identify herself through these three factors. “They are all connected in one way or another,” she says. Although these two authors have a completely different background, one being a Native American while the other is a Chinese-Vietnamese-American, they share the same feeling about their identity—that is, they identify themselves through their relation to land, oral tradition, and language....   [tags: Native American, American Indians] 1392 words
(4 pages)
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Native American Education - Native American Education Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and fundamental way of life stripped from them almost unceasingly for decades. Although they were the real “natives” of the land, they were driven off by the government and coerced to assimilate to the white man’s way. Unfortunately, the persecution of the Natives was primarily based on the prevalent greed for money and power....   [tags: Native Americans]
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Native American Education - Through the years minority groups have long endured repression, poverty, and discrimination. A prime example of such a group is the Native Americans. They had their own land and basic way of life stripped from them almost constantly for decades. Although they were the actual “natives” of the land, they were forced by the government to give it up and compelled to assimilate to the white man’s way. This past scarred the Native American’s preservation of culture as many were discouraged to speak the native language and dress in traditional clothing....   [tags: Native Americans]
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Maintenance Bilingual Education for Heritage Language Learners - Introduction According to the 2010 U.S. census the Latino community makes up 16% of the country’s population and grew 43% from 2000 (Humes, Jones & Ramirez, 2011). Within this large community there is great diversity both culturally and linguistically (Schreffler, 2007), from newly arrived immigrants to individuals whose families have been established in the region for generations. Most bilingual education programs are targeted towards English language learners (ELL) with the purpose of acquiring a second language (L2)....   [tags: Language ]
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Language Acquisition Principles - Language Acquisition Principles Stephen Krashen is one of the experts when it comes to language acquisition. He has theorized on the subject of second language acquisition for years and has been quite influential in the field of linguistics approaching the subject of second language acquisition by presenting his five hypotheses for his theory of acquiring a second language. His approach comes from his view that acquisition is obtained best through contextual conversation, which demonstrates his Acquisition-Learning hypothesis....   [tags: Language ]
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Language Acquisition Principles - Stephen Krashen is one of the experts when it comes to language acquisition. He has theorized on the subject of second language acquisition for years and has been quite influential in this field of linguistics. He approaches the subject of second language acquisition by presenting his five theories for acquiring a second language. Aida Walqui is another expert; however, she approaches the subject from the aspect that contextual factors are involved in second language learning. Even though Krashen and Walqui are attempting to achieve a similar goal, their methodologies are different....   [tags: Language ]
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Infant Language Development - Language is a communicative system of words and symbols unique to humans. The origins of language are still a mystery as fossil remains cannot speak. However, the rudiments of language can be inferred through studying linguistic development in children and the cognitive and communicative abilities of primates as discussed by Bridgeman (2003). This essay illustrates the skills infants have that will eventually help them to acquire language. The topics covered are firstly, the biological aspects, the contribution of the human brain to language development....   [tags: Language ]
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Native Americans and Their Intrinsic Relationship with Western Films - Dances With Wolves, directed by Kevin Costner, and The Searchers, directed by John Ford, looks into the fabric of this country's past. The media has created a false image of the relationship between Native Americans and White men to suppress the cruel and unfortunate reality. Both directors wanted to contradict these stereotypes, but due to the time period the films were created, only one film was successful. Unlike The Searchers, Dancing With Wolves presents a truly realistic representation of Native Americans....   [tags: Native Americans ] 941 words
(2.7 pages)
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Developing Language Acquisitions - Students learning English are expected to learn the foreign language, English based on various experiments, studies, concepts, and theories. However, focusing on the principles of learning a new language sets forth high standards if applied appropriately. Learning English inquires language acquisition principles that will focus on learning strategies, content, context, meaning and knowledge. The article Principles of Instructed Second Language Acquisition by Rod Ellis is a very meaningful article that acknowledges and explains in detail the principles of language acquisition and how to imply such learning principles within the classroom setting....   [tags: Language ]
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Language Test Analysis - Language Test Analysis 1. Purpose of the test Was to expand the skills of professionals who will in turn impart this knowledge to speakers of second languages and form a basis for professionalism in language teaching as well as evaluate their as understanding of English language in a classroom situation. At the end of the test, the learner should have been able to construct future classroom tests for the assessment of linguistic competence (grammar and vocabulary) and the four language skills. My two tested subjects were a middle-aged Irish woman with O-Level education from her native Belfast High School and a 50-year old Jamaican immigrant who had lived in London for the better part of his...   [tags: Language ]
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Integrating Holistic Modalities into Native American Alcohol Treatment - Alcoholism is identified by severe dependence or addiction and cumulative patterns of characteristic behaviors. An alcoholic’s frequent intoxication is obvious and destructive; interfering with the ability to socialize and work. These behavior patterns may lead to loss of work and relationships (Merck, 1999). Strong evidence suggests that alcoholism runs in families (Schuckit, 2009). According to a study published by Schuckit (1999) monozygotic twins were at a significantly higher risk of alcoholism if one twin was an alcoholic....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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Attitudes of Iranian English Language Teachers towards the Use of Persian in EFL Classrooms at Private Language Institutes in Tehran - Introduction In most Iranian private language institutes, inspired by the rise of Communicative Language Teaching, EFL teachers are largely encouraged to run their classes on the bases of a “monolingual approach” where only English is used within their classrooms. Some scholars have supported this approach and believe that since the process of L2 and L1 acquisition are similar, more exposure to L2 which results in less exposure to L1 is essential, because interference from L1 knowledge hinders L2 learning process (Cook, 2001; Krashen, 1981)....   [tags: Language ]
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Native American Flutes - Although Native Americans are known for their voice being a vital instrument, most rituals, songs, and dances are accompanied by an assortment of instruments such as, drums, rattles, flutes. Every instrument has it is own meaning and a purpose. In this section, the significance of these instruments as well as their structure and functionality is explored. The drums are a vital aspect to the Native American culture; they understand the drum to be more than an instrument. In a web article written by Elisa Throp entitled, “The importance of drums to Native American culture”, Elisa says, “It is a Voice....   [tags: Native American Culture]
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The Power of Language - The Power of Language The unity of a nation is one of the most important factors that determine its prosperity. In this case, language has become one of the most influential driving forces in its ability to enhance communication with others. Wherever people from some country travel through another countries, they carried with them, a national identity, which is usually involved in languages. In the United States, most of people speak English rather than any other language. However, this nation does not have a law that regulates English as a national language....   [tags: United States, Language, English] 951 words
(2.7 pages)
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Taking Advantage of One’s Early Years: Learning a Second Language - Being able to fluently speak two languages is a very demanding and competitive skill. The capability to articulate thoughts to people who may not speak the same primary language as you is very profitable not only in the work force, but also in everyday life. Learning a second language also helps to shorten cultural gaps between different countries. With the seemingly increased importance in learning a second language, schools nationwide have implemented learning a foreign language as a requirement, for graduation in High School....   [tags: Language ]
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Language Acquisition - What is language. Language is a set of arbitrary symbols that enables every individual in the community to communicate and interact. These symbols contain acceptable meanings by the society and culture. Possessing a language is essential in all human; every normal human speaks but nonhuman does not. Acquisition, on the other hand, means learning or getting. Therefore, language acquisition basically means the learning or the gaining of a language. Language acquisition is normally viewed as a part of cognitive science....   [tags: Language ]
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Language Switching - As an English native speaker, I embarked on learning a second language from an early age. Due to the fact I lived in an area with a lot of Spanish-speakers, I found it relevant to my lifestyle to learn Spanish. However, I can easily make it around every day without using my second language. However, there are borders that defy that statement. There are Spanish communities in the Northeastern province of Spain where Catalan is spoken along with Spanish. Psychologists have often question the effects of bilingualism on the brain, but have “often lacked information regarding the age of acquisition, the degree of proficiency and the degrees of exposure to a given language of the tested sample” (G...   [tags: Language]
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English is the World Language - Question 1: Write your own definition of the term global language. A global language is one that is widespread internationally and used as the common one for communication between various groups and societies. It is the language that is most taught and learnt as a foreign and/ or a second language worldwide. This kind of language has a large amount of prestige, and official or special status. It is the language of politics, international business or economics, international communication, academic conferences, science, technology, tourism, media, publishing of books or journals, newspapers, and health sciences....   [tags: World Language] 1659 words
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The Power of Language - The unity of a nation is one of the most important factors that determine its prosperity. In this case, language has become one of the most influential driving forces in its ability to enhance communication with others. In the United States, most people speak English rather than any other languages. However, this nation does not have a law that regulates English as a national language. Therefore, there is fear that other languages will override English, causing a language barrier to rise inside the country....   [tags: English, United States, Official Language] 936 words
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New Forms of Language: The Binary Code - The question as to what role language plays in different areas of knowledge and of what importance in every case, cannot be of an easy answer. I am not certain whether language in humans is a product according to behaviorist psychology theory (B.F. Skinner) that assumes no innate capacity but the impact of experience and learning or is innate (according to Noam Chomsky), present from birth as a feature of the human brain. Language as a way of Knowing Language according to Merriam Webster can be defined as: - the system of words or signs that people use to express thoughts and feelings to each other - any one of the systems of human language that are used and understood by a particular...   [tags: native tongues, words, rheomode]
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1345 words
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Lasting Effects of European Colonization on Native American Indians. - Effects of Colonisation on North American Indians Since the Europeans set foot on North American soil in 1620,they have had a devastating effect on the native population. I will be discussing the long term effect of North American colonisation on the Native Americans, focusing on such issues as employment opportunities, the environment, culture and traditions, health, as well as social justice. I will begin with the important issue of employment opportunities. The unemployment rate for Native Americans is a staggering 49%....   [tags: native americans, indians, colonial america] 1035 words
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Description of English Language Learners - According to the Glossary of Education Reform ("English language learner," 2013), English Language Learners (ELL) are students who are unable to communicate fluently or learn effective in English; who often come from non English speaking homes and backgrounds. And who typically require specialized or modified instruction in both English language and in their academic courses. Immigrants make up 13% of the United States population, and within the 13% many people have children who speak their native language....   [tags: ell student, english language, languages]
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Foreign Language at a Younger Age - Foreign Language at a Younger Age (Lariat) Imagine you are sitting in a classroom full of people who are bilingual, but you are the only one who cannot speak another language except your own. What do you do. Are you going to try and communicate. Or wonder why you did not take the foreign language classes that might have been available to you during your earlier years of education. The key words here are, “might have been available.” Some schools may not have foreign language added to their curriculum, but it should be added because it would be an excellent opportunity for students to be better educated....   [tags: language acquisition, bilingualism]
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Age and Second Language Acquisition - With the increasing popularity of dual immersion programs in schools and the widespread notion that language acquisition is something that needs to happen early on life, is there an ideal age to learn a second language (L2). Wilder Penfield and Lamar Roberts first introduced the idea that there is a “critical period” for learning language in 1959. This critical period is a biologically determined period referring to a period of time when learning/acquiring a language is relatively easy and typically meets with a high degree of success....   [tags: Second Language Acquisition]
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Acquisition of Language in Children - Possessing a language is a quintessentially human trait, yet the acquisition of language in children is not perfectly understood. Most explanations involve the observation that children mimic what they hear and the assumption that human beings have a natural ability to understand grammar. Behaviorist B.F. Skinner originally proposed that language must be learned and cannot be a module. The mind consisted of sensorimotor abilities as well as laws of learning that govern gradual changes in an organism’s behavior (Skinner, B.F., 1957)....   [tags: Chomsky, Language Acquisition] 2175 words
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Portrayal of Native Americans in Film - When Columbus first set foot in the New World, he believed that he had arrived in the islands just off the coast of Cipango, known today as China. Thinking this, he called the people that he met Indians, as they lived on the islands that he falsely believed were the Indies. The term Indian spread back to Europe, as did the term Indies, and to this day, Native Americans are known as Indians, and the Caribbean islands are referred to as the West Indies. The Indians populated a much greater area than Columbus could have imagined, covering the land of two Continents....   [tags: Native American Stereotypes in Film]
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English Should be the National Language - From the time the Pilgrims landed in this great nation at Plymouth Rock, immigrants have been culturally diverse and have spoken many languages. When the Pilgrims arrived in the New World, they did not know how to communicate with the natives. Through intense study the natives learned the Pilgrims’ language. Even with the common language they were still a melting pot of different culture. Some would say that America has gotten over the language/ cultural barriers and now almost everyone speaks the common language of English, but there are still many immigrants who do not know English....   [tags: Should English be America's national language?]
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The Effects of Learning a Second Language in Adulthood - Introduction Being able to speak more than one language is proving to be a valuable skill in modern society. Many children across the world are at least bilingual, leaving many American parents wondering if they too, should learn to speak another language. While this debate remains ongoing, many adults are seeking to learn a second language either to communicate with a new client base or to attain higher status within a corporate setting. Most Americans learn a second language in adulthood. Many public schools do not begin teaching second languages until high school, and all college students must study a foreign language in order to graduate from the university....   [tags: Second Language Acquisition]
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Language Acquisition: Understanding Language and its Ontogenetic and Phylogenetic Aspects - Over thousands of years language has evolved and continued to develop to what we know it as today. Throughout the years, it has been studied how we learn language and the benefits of learning it as well as the deficits of not learning it. While studying language it is important to consider the language acquisition device, language acquisition support system, and Infant-Directed and Adult-Directed Speech. Not only is it important to learn language in general, but there are specific sensitive periods in which a human must learn the language in order to obtain developmental milestones....   [tags: language origin, speech, communication]
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Using literature in ESL and the principles of Communicative Language Teaching - Using literature in ESL and the principles of Communicative Language Teaching Among the reasons Van (2009) believes studying literature in the ESL classroom is advantageous (providing meaningful contexts, a profound range of vocabulary, enhancing creativity and developing cultural awareness and critical thinking), he mentions the fact that it is in line with CLT (Communicative Language Teaching) principles. It is worth to elaborate this last point by specifying the ways in which literary exploration in the language classroom can go hand in hand with the main tenets of CLT....   [tags: Language, Teaching]
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The Influence of the Russian Language on Russian Culture - The Russian language belongs to the Indo-European family, along with other east Slavonic languages Belarusian and Ukrainian. The Russian language, fairly young, came from a common predecessor: Common Slavonic, which was divided as the Slavic people immigrated in around the 5th century AD. Brothers St. Cyril and St. Methodius, in 863 AD were sent to Moravia (currently the Czech Republic) to translate the Gospel into Slavic. This script was later known as the Glagolitic script. The old Cyrillic alphabet had 44 letters, including Greek numerals was adopted by the eastern Slavs; it became the script used by Russians....   [tags: Russian Language Essays]
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Great Advantages in Learning a Second Language - Bilingual Education is an enriched model of education where two languages and two cultures meet to create a unique quality school experience. Children who have been educated through such a model will be able to function in two languages and in two or more cultures, and will be better prepared to face up to the demands, the new millennium places upon us. Bilingual Education strives not only for bilingual proficiency, but also for high academic achievement and cross-cultural awareness. In Bilingual programs the instruction in two languages is carried out by native qualified and committed teachers who, plan their lessons together but, in teaching, keep the two languages distinct by adopting the...   [tags: language, bilingual, cultures]
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Uses of Fingerspelling and American Sign Language - American Sign Language is the visual language that has been created by the deaf in this country. For those with a limited knowledge of deaf culture or American Sign Language (ASL), fingerspelling may be a foreign concept. Fingerspelling is the act of using the manual alphabet of ASL to spell a word or phrase. All fingerspelling is done with the dominant hand, as are one-handed signs, and is ideally done in the area between the shoulder and the chin on the same side as the dominant hand. This skill serves many purposes and functions in ASL conversation....   [tags: sign language, deaf, fingerspelling] 1225 words
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Improving Language Acquisition in Bilingual Children - For most bilingual speakers, the English language is hard to navigate. Like an unknown street, not natural to them, they stumble to find the words to say what they want to say; they trip over cracks of pronunciation, taking wrong turns over careless misuse, out of context phrasing, as they attempt to follow the rules of ambiguous signage established by others. “Uh, um, hmmm, how do you say…?” A long pause follows. The image that comes to mind is of a student scratching at their head, hesitating before finally delivering the “right” word....   [tags: learning English as a second language]
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Language Acquisition - Language is perceived as the way humans communicate through the use of spoken words, it involves particular system and styles in which we interact with one another (Oxford 2009). Possessing this ability to communicate through the use of language is thought to be a quintessential human trait (Pinker 2000). Learning a language, know as language acquisition, is something that every child does successfully within a few years. Language acquisition is in itself the development by which humans acquire the ability to perceive, produce and use words to understand and communicate....   [tags: Language Acquisition] 1370 words
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Three Types of Language in North Carolina - You may think you have heard it all until you come to the south. The phonetics and dialect is most basic and unconscious. Scotch-Irish, English, and Cherokee languages left distinct dialects, which made a great contribution to the heritage, vocabulary, and way of life. Departing from traditional standard English, Carolina dialects claim no cognitive validity concerning proper grammar. Equally important, speaking ideally a language that poses as English. The rhetoric, syntax, and semantics change depending on audience, geographical location, occasion, and intent of communication....   [tags: phonetics, dialect, cherokee language] 631 words
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Studying Language Acquisition - Language is a sparingly important part of life. When we communicate with other people, only not empower us to understand one another, but facilitates in building relationships and permitting us to communicate our problems, ideas, projects, or anything related to our daily life. Language is an essential part of everyday life. One of the queries that as humans we have are how did we learn to speak and how do we know what to say and when to say certain things. Acquiring language and using language is an amazing faculty we, as individuals, have....   [tags: learning to speak a second language] 639 words
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Noam Chomsky's Impact on Language - Modern day linguistics has seen the arrival of many different viewpoints of language. Beginning with Noam Chomsky, unquestionably one of the most influential figures in recent linguistics, new theories and ideas have been introduced at a rapid rate. In part due to his status as a revitalizer in the field, but also due to his often controversial theories, Chomsky maintains a place at the center of this discussion. His search for a universal grammar and criticism of pure descriptivism have informed generations of research....   [tags: Language]
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One Nation, One Language - One of the most controversial debates in this era is the issue of national language in the United States. Although many countries have declared English as their official language, the U.S. bicameral chambers have persisted to recognize English as the official language. In his article, “In Plain English: Let’s Make It Official,” Charles Krauthammer reflects on contrasting viewpoints in our nation regarding this matter, and supports his idea that a comprehensive plan for ensuring the rights of languages should be passed by the legislative bodies....   [tags: Language ]
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The Southeast Native Americans: Cherokees and Creeks - The Native Americans of the southeast live in a variety of environments. The environments range from the southern Appalachian Mountains, to the Mississippi River valley, to the Louisiana and Alabama swamps, and the Florida wetlands. These environments were bountiful with various species of plant and animal life, enabling the Native American peoples to flourish. “Most of the Native Americans adopted large-scale agriculture after 900 A.D, and some also developed large towns and highly centralized social and political structures.” In the first half of the 1600s Europeans encountered these native peoples....   [tags: Native Americans ]
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The Native Americans' Lack of Materialism - People have been living in America for countless years, even before Europeans had discovered and populated it. These people, named Native Americans or American Indians, have a unique and singular culture and lifestyle unlike any other. Native Americans were divided into several groups or tribes. Each one tribe developed an own language, housing, clothing, and other cultural aspects. As we take a look into their society’s customs we can learn additional information about the lives of these indigenous people of the United States....   [tags: Native Americans, USA, ] 610 words
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Should the United States Make English the Official language? - According to the 2011 census, over 20.8 percent of the United States population spoke another language other than English (www.us-english.org). Language barriers, cultural differences, and immigration have been a part of life in the United States for decades. Language is considered a vital tool in the construction of someone’s identity and an expression of culture. In the last 200 years immigrants have chosen to make the United States their home, but some proceeded with caution by slowly adapting to the English language and culture....   [tags: English Official Language]
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Explore the Effect of a Critical Period on Second Language Acquisition - Critical Period Hypothesis: Critical Period (CP) refers to a specific and ‘fixed’ or invariant period of time during which an organism’s neural functioning is open to effects of external experiential input. To be specific, there are three important essentials in this conception. Firstly, this developmental period is biologically determined; the onset, end and the length of the critical period are invariant, which is the consequences of some internal clock that keeps time independent of what happens during the window of time....   [tags: Second Language Acquisition]
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Language Barrier: Bilingual Education vs. English Immersion - Bilingual teaching in American schools is it good, bad, or both. Who is right in this national debate. Both sides make some impressive arguments for their side of the issue. Even the government has mixed issues when it comes to bilingual teaching. However, the government has shown their views in their budgets and their law making. Another question comes up with the bilingual teaching is should America make English its official language. Some say there is no need for it, and yet 22 states as of 1996 declared English their official language....   [tags: foreign language, spanish]
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Effective Intervention with English Language Learners (ELL) - Research review Over the semester I worked with a young girl who is an English language learner (ELL). An English language learner is someone who is not yet fully competent with the English language and his or her native language is not English (Lerner and Johns, 2012). Lowered English competency leads individuals to encounter difficulties comprehending and using the English language (Learner and Johns, 2012). The need for adequate language capabilities is paramount in life and education, without it one may not receive information or actively participate in the environment....   [tags: English Language Learners]
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The Impact of Culture on Second Language Acquisition - Introduction The issue of English language learning has been always a controversial one for almost all non-English language countries around the world these days. However, it seems language learning difficulties are not restricted to those who attempt to learn English. This is the same issue when an English speaker attempts to learn another language especially the Middle Eastern or Asian Languages. There are several hypotheses and theories concerning the language learning difficulties from different perspectives....   [tags: Language ]
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An Examination of the Dogme Method of Language acquisition in English Language Teaching - Initially Dogme is a filmmaking technique established in 1995 by a group of Danish directors when they tried to create more successful films with fewer preparations. Meddings and Thornbury (2009, 104) state that “Dogme demands that no props are introduced to the authentic film location…and the sole use of hand-held camera”. Eventually this technique was obtained as a teaching method since sometimes teachers may face a lack of materials which can be a loss of electricity source that could affect a lesson based on listening or at least affect photocopying materials for students....   [tags: Language ] 1378 words
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Effective Literacy Strategies for English Language Learners - Introduction English Language Learners (hereafter referred to as ELLs) currently comprise 10% of the total school population in the United States (National Center for Education Statistics, 2005). It is a population that is going to continue to increase in American public education and their specific needs for learning literacy are of great importance to teachers. Since schools and teachers are increasingly judged based upon the academic achievement of students, then the success of the growing population of ELLs is going to be increasingly important....   [tags: English Language Learners, ELLs]
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Evolution of the English Language and the Emergence of “World Englishes” - Evolution of the English Language and the Emergence of “World Englishes” As technology is bringing the world closer together, increasing the contact between peoples of different languages and cultures, the English language has established itself as the tool for communication, becoming the lingua franca of today’s globalized society. This role that English has taken can be traced back to a unique evolutionary history that should be understood on two separate levels. This first level of evolution that English has undergone is in the nature of the language itself....   [tags: Language ]
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