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The Meno - In the Meno, Plato justifies the possibility for one’s mind to uncover knowledge. Knowing one can obtain knowledge motivates the mind to gain more knowledge. Plato explains the theory of recollection by first questioning what virtue is, then demonstrating the process through the questioning of a slave boy. Although a few weaknesses present themselves in Plato’s argument, Plato presents a valid theory on how our minds can obtain knowledge. This paper focuses on exploring Plato’s theory of recollection by examining the strengths and weaknesses of his discussion with Meno....   [tags: essays research papers] 1306 words
(3.7 pages)
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Meno - There is not a great deal of context that is crucial to understanding the essential themes of the Meno, largely because the dialogue sits nearly at the beginning of western philosophy. Socrates and Plato are working not so much in the context of previous philosophies as in the context of the lack of them. Further, this is very probably one of Plato's earliest surviving dialogues, set in about 402 BCE (by extension, we might presume that it represents Socrates at a relatively early stage in his own thought)....   [tags: essays research papers] 1752 words
(5 pages)
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Meno's Paradox - Meno's Paradox It is thought that Meno's paradox is of critical importance both within Plato's thought and within the whole history of ideas. It's major importance is that for the first time on record, the possibility of achieving knowledge from the mind's own resources rather than from experience is articulated, demonstrated and seen as raising important philosophical questions. Meno's paradox states: `Why on what lines will you look, Socrates, for a thing of whose nature you know nothing at all....   [tags: Philosophy] 2022 words
(5.8 pages)
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Platos Meno - The questions of what exactly knowledge, virtue and the soul are, are among the most important problems of philosophy The soul may be defined as the ultimate internal principle by which we think, feel, and exist. If there is life after death, the soul must be capable of an existence separate from the body. The mysteries of birth and death, the lapse of conscious life during sleep, even the most common operations of imagination and memory, which abstract a man from his bodily presence even while awake; all such facts suggest the existence of something other....   [tags: essays research papers] 1338 words
(3.8 pages)
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Platos Meno - Plato Meno In Plato’s dialogue Socrates discusses ways in which virtue can be acquired with Meno. Three possibilities are confronted, first that virtue is innate within the human soul. The second suggests that virtue can be taught, and the third possibility is that virtue is a gift from the gods. These ways are debated by Socrates and Meno to a very broad conclusion. Socrates poses the question that virtue may be innate within the human soul. This is to say that all people would have virtue within them, but it is only those who find it that can truly become virtuous....   [tags: essays research papers] 993 words
(2.8 pages)
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MENO: PLATO - "Socrates, can virtue be taught?"1 The dialogue begins with Meno asking Socrates whether virtue can be taught. At the end of the Meno (86d-100b), Socrates attempts to answer the question. This question is prior to the division between opinion and knowledge and provides to unsettle both. Anytus participated in Socrates and Meno conversation about virtue. Socrates claims that if virtue is a kind of knowledge, then it can be learned. If it is something besides a kind of knowledge, it perceptibly cannot be taught....   [tags: Ethics] 611 words
(1.7 pages)
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Defining Excellence in "Meno" - In Plato’s Meno, Socrates purposefully uses ignorance and irony to insufficiently define excellence for Meno. Initially, Meno argues a particular definition, which is a universally inconsistent proof, is sufficient to define excellence. However, Socrates asserts that the definition of excellence must be consistent and applicable to all individuals, by comparing individuals in a society to bees in a colony. Socrates demonstrates the failure of a particular proof to define all constituents of a group....   [tags: Literary Themes] 2005 words
(5.7 pages)
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Meno - Shape - "Shape is that which alone of existing things always follows color." "A shape is that which limits a solid; in a word, a shape is the limit of a solid." In the play Meno, written by Plato, there is a point in which Meno asks that Socrates give a definition of shape. In the end of it, Socrates is forced to give two separate definitions, for Meno considers the first to be foolish. As the two definitions are read and compared, one is forced to wonder which, if either of the two, is true, and if neither of them are true, which one has the most logic....   [tags: essays research papers] 1426 words
(4.1 pages)
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Platos Meno - The dialogue opens up with Meno asking what virtue is and whether it could be taught. Socrates asks Meno for a general definition of virtue, since as Socrates points out, we cannot figure out if virtue can be taught if we do not have a clear idea what it is. Socrates is looking for a general, or formal definition of virtue, not just examples or instances of it. Socrates wants to know what all the examples of virtue have in common. He wants to know the essence of virtue. Meno initially offers a list of virtues, but Socrates rejects this as a sufficient account....   [tags: essays research papers] 801 words
(2.3 pages)
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Recollection in Plato's Phaedo and Meno - Recollection in Plato's Phaedo and Meno As the earliest philosopher from whom we have written texts, Plato is often misrepresented as merely reproducing Socratic rhetoric. In Meno, one of the first Platonic dialogues, Plato offers his own unique philosophical theory, infused with his mentor's brilliant sophistry. Amidst discussing whether or not virtue can be taught, Meno poses a difficult paradox: How can one be virtuous, or seek virtue, when one cannot know what it is. "How will you aim to search for something you do not know at all?" (Plato, Meno, 80d)....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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The Republic: Protagoras, Gorgias, and Meno - The Republic: Protagoras, Gorgias, and Meno One vigorous line of thought in contemporary moral philosophy, which I shall call ‘Neo-Aristotelianism,’ centers on three things: (1) a rejection of traditional enlightenment moral theories like Kantianism and utilitarianism; (2) a claim that another look at the ethical concerns and projects of ancient Greek thought might help us past the impasse into which enlightenment moral theories have left us; (3) more particularly, an attempt to reinterpret Aristotle’s ethical work for the late twentieth-century so as to transcend this impasse....   [tags: Philosophy Morals Neo Aristotelianism Papers]
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Can Excellence Be Attained? - In Plato’s Meno, Socrates uses ignorance to prove excellence cannot be taught or even attained by human actions. The process involves Socrates purposefully contradicting himself to entice Meno’s focus. Through Socrates, Plato argues particular criteria cannot determine excellence within a collective. Instead, Socrates asserts excellence must be a universal quality and applicable to all individuals, by comparing the human collective to a bee colony. Socrates purposefully fails to use a universally applicable proof for shapes to define a square....   [tags: Philosophy] 1699 words
(4.9 pages)
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Platonic Paradox - To research Plato's paradox in the Meno, we can first consult the definition of what platonism is. Websters defines platonism as "actual things are copies of transcendent ideas and that these ideas are the objects of true knowledge apprehended by reminiscence." For this essay, we will assume that trancendency is- "that which is beyond comprehension", and reminiscence as "past experience". The Meno is a dialogue between Socrates, a scholar and Meno, who eventually became an explorer....   [tags: essays research papers] 1721 words
(4.9 pages)
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Plato's View in Human Knowledge - Plato's View in Human Knowledge Plato presents three different views about knowledge in Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus. In Meno's case, Plato believes knowledge as something innate in us when we are born; in his later view, in Republic, Plato believes we perceive things and gain knowledge; and from the last view, in Theaetus, Plato believes knowledge is the combination of a true opinion and a rational opinion. Strangely enough, Plato's views in Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus are similar, regarding the characteristics of knowledge....   [tags: Papers] 1400 words
(4 pages)
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A Hobbesian and Heroic Unreflective Citizenship - A Hobbesian and Heroic Unreflective Citizenship In Meno, Plato asks “what virtue itself is” (Plato 60). This dialogue on virtue between Socrates and Meno ably frames a wider dialogue on ethics between Thomas Hobbes, the Greek heroic tradition, and the sophists of 5th century Athens. Hobbes’ Leviathan and Aristophanes’ The Clouds introduce three classes of ethical actors to respond to Plato’s inquiry: Hobbes’ ethical lemmings, the heroic ethical traditionalists, and the sophist ethical opportunists....   [tags: Hobbes Plato Philosophy Philosophical Essays]
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Menos Paradox - What is Meno’s Paradox. First, who is Meno. The Meno is one of the earlier Platonic writings, which include Socrates and which look to try to define an ethic, in this case virtue. Meno himself is seemingly a man who is greedy for wealth, greedy for power, ambitious, and a back-stabber who tries to play everything to his own advantage. Meno starts by questioning Socrates. Can virtue be taught. Socrates says to Meno, well, what makes a virtue a virtue. Meno comes to the borrowed point that virtue is “to find joy in beautiful things and have power”....   [tags: essays research papers] 690 words
(2 pages)
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Can virtue be taught? - lthough today's society includes much technology and new things are supposedly being discovered every day, many age old questions still remain unanswered; questions such as: "Can virtue be taught?" This question is examined in detail throughout Plato's Meno, and although the play leaves the question as to what virtue is unanswered, Socrates attempts an answer to Meno's question. Although he is not particularly keen on answering whether virtue can be taught without first having a complete understanding of what virtue is, he attempts to please Meno by solving this in the way that geometers conduct their investigations, through a hypothesis....   [tags: essays research papers] 556 words
(1.6 pages)
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Plato and Locke's Views on an Innate Idea - Plato and Locke's Views on an Innate Idea        What is an innate idea?  This can be defined as some idea or mental representation that is produced by outside perception or created anew by our imagination. It exists in the mind in virtue of the nature of the human mind.  According to Plato most if not all of our knowledge is innate. However, John Locke feels that we do not have any innate ideas.  Then the question arises of who is right or are they both wrong.  In this paper I will attempt to examine the conflicting views of Plato and Locke....   [tags: Philosophy essays]
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The Chemistry of Knowledge - The Chemistry of Knowledge Hippeas thought he had all the answers. “I have never found any man who was my superior in anything,” he boasted. Then he meets Socrates. Though he had made thousands of public speeches about virtue, a dialogue with the wisest of Athenians leads Hippeas to confess that he “cannot even say what [virtue] is” (Hippeas 70). Lesser Hippeas discredits Hippeas but offers little more than a negative definition of knowledge. Meno, Phaedo, and the Republic provide a more comprehensive discussion of the definition, the good and the teaching of knowledge....   [tags: Philosophy Knowledge Knowing Plato Essays]
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Ignorance is Not an Excuse - Ignorance is Not an Excuse We only choose what we think is good and if anyone chooses evil it must be through ignorance. Plato believes that we always choose good unless we are ignorant. Plato claims being ignorant would be the only excuse for choosing evil. His views of this are apparent in the Meno. As I read up on whether or not we deliberately choose evil I realized there are many sides, many ways to answer this question. My opinion is not as clear as I thought. In this paper I will go through numerous writings on this subject, such as the Meno....   [tags: Papers] 987 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Theory of Innate Virtue - ... Yes. Soc. But since this side is also of two feet, there are twice two feet. Boy. There are. Soc. Then the square is of twice two feet. Boy. Yes. Soc. And how many are twice two feet. count and tell me. Boy. Four, Socrates. Soc. And might there not be another square twice as large as this, and having like this the lines equal. Boy. Yes. Soc. And of how many feet will that be. Boy. Of eight feet. Soc. And now try and tell me the length of the line which forms the side of that double square: this is two feet-what will that be....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Philosophy - Philosophy When I was born, I did not know the difference between right and wrong. Now, I do. The word philosophy means the love of knowledge. One type of knowledge is propter quid, which ask the question why or how. In this paper, I will demonstrate how Socrates, Hume and Aristotle, three well known philosophers, would explain how I acquired this knowledge in relation to the principles of right and wrong. Socrates is the first philosopher, I will discuss....   [tags: Papers] 1426 words
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On the Chopin ballade in g minor - ... Example 2 - Moderato: Chopin Ballade in G minor, Op. 23., Nr. 1  The melody, the opening line comprised of five eighth notes, is claimed by the right hand where the C4 is the most important note of the line. Outlining the V7 of G minor for the majority of its occurrence with exception to measure fourteen where the V7/III is outlined instead, the first note of this melodic line effortlessly drives the melody to the downbeat, tonicizing G minor each time that the V7 reoccurs. As the moderato section progresses, the underlying bass figure becomes more and more involved as it winds through several progressions before resulting in the V7/III highly embellished eighteen-note run set against three quarter notes....   [tags: Classical Music] 1688 words
(4.8 pages)
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Plato's Theory of Knowledge - ... Socrates also states, “Either we all have this knowledge at birth, and continue to know through life; or after birth, those who are said to learn only recollect” (The Search for Knowledge 90) which states that the immortality of the soul is the foundation of Plato’s theory of recollection and further proves it so. The third dialogue of Plato, the Republic, states the idea of the Metaphor of the Sun. The idea of the sun comes where in order to have facts, an individual must have the light to see these facts....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek] 2744 words
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what is knowledge - Many philosophers have inquired about what is knowledge. Most believe that knowledge is attained by being taught, and not suppressed in our mind since birth. In Plato’s Meno, Socrates argues in favor of the pre existing knowledge, that knowledge is essentially suppressed, and is brought to light through questioning. The argument, which comes from this view of “knowledge”, is that if you know what it is you are inquiring about, you don’t need to inquire, because you already know. However, if you do not know what it is you are inquiring about, you are unable to inquire, because you do not know what you inquiring....   [tags: essays research papers] 640 words
(1.8 pages)
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Is Knowledge Worth Seeking - Socrates argued that actively seeking out knowledge leads to the ability of man to moderate his behavior accordingly. If one examines a situation thoughtfully, and from several angles, the most logical course of action will present itself. By exercising this method of reasoning a person becomes wise. Socrates would call this the ability to govern the qualities of your soul properly and it is undoubtedly what he sought. The process brings out the virtuous qualities in man and allows him to make decisions based on truth, which leads ultimately to good....   [tags: essays research papers] 1415 words
(4 pages)
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Runaway Statues: Platonic Lessons on the Limits of an Analogy - Runaway Statues: Platonic Lessons on the Limits of an Analogy ABSTRACT: Plato’s best-known distinction between knowledge and opinion occurs in the Meno. The distinction rests on an analogy that compares the acquisition and retention of knowledge to the acquisition and retention of valuable material goods. But Plato saw the limitations of the analogy and took pains to warn against learning the wrong lessons from it. In this paper, I will revisit this familiar analogy with a view to seeing how Plato both uses and distances himself from it....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Analogy Essays]
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Socrates - Socrates Who is Socrates. Socrates was a Greek philosopher. He was the best of his time (400's BC), and is considered one of the wisest people of all times. Also, he was the first of three of the greatest teachers of ancient Greece. He was born and died in Athens. He was a short philosopher, who wore only a white robe at all times and all seasons. Socrates wasn’t interested in money nor fame. He wrote no books and most the information known about him comes from his students: Plato and Xenophon....   [tags: Papers] 2071 words
(5.9 pages)
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Aristotle Vs. Plato Learning Is Recollection - What alternative does Aristotle offer to Plato’s claim that learning is recollection. Where would Aristotle locate the mistake in Plato’s argument in The Phaedo. In his dialogues The Phaedo and Meno, Plato, through the form of Socrates, puts forth the idea that all learning is recollection. In The Phaedo, to prove that the soul is immortal, Socrates asserts the view that all learning is recollection and we simply need to be reminded of facts that our immortal souls are aware of. In Meno, Socrates attempts to show the truth of this belief by doing complex geometry with a nearby slave boy....   [tags: essays research papers] 649 words
(1.9 pages)
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Devious Art of Cunning - The aesthetics of being taken in by a tall tale or someone’s superior wit, is explained by simple human curiosity. We love to be entertained by suspense, comedy, pain, sadness, hurt and etc. Not only are these emotions observed, but experienced by the audience. That is what entices the human race. To be summoned into a story and letting the imagination explore through the words, letting it create a life of it’s own inside the audience. That alone is so devious, but there is so much more to the cunning within and surrounding a tale....   [tags: Philosophy] 1098 words
(3.1 pages)
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The Immortality of the Soul - ... Socrates offers readers four main arguments: The Cyclical Argument, which is the idea that forms are fixed and external. The soul is the sole purpose of life in this argument, and therefore cannot die and it is also to be seen as virtually never-ending. Next is The Theory of Recollection, which insists that at birth everyone has knowledge that the soul experienced in another life. Meaning that the soul would have had to be existent before birth to bear this said knowledge. The Form of Life Argument confers that the soul bears a resemblance to that which is imperceptible and godly because it is abstract....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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The Metaphysical One in Platonic and Augustinian Thoughts - The Metaphysical One in Platonic and Augustinian Thoughts The legacy of Plato left its distinctive brand of influence on St. Augustine's beliefs and writings, of this there is no doubt. In Confessions, Augustine himself professed that it was the Platonic books that enabled him to attach himself to his God. However, it is evident that Augustine re-augmented much of the Platonic thoughts and, combining them with the early Christian doctrines, configured the hybrid into what became the foundation of Catholicism....   [tags: Philosophy Essays] 2190 words
(6.3 pages)
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A Comparison of Classic and Contemporary Philosophers - A Comparison of Classic And Contemporary Philosophers Why is it so important that young children in our society receive a good education. The answer to that question is very simple; because they are our future. The old saying “the youth of today are the leaders off tomorrow” holds more truth than many people realize. By giving children a good start at an early age we are only helping ourselves as well as the children. A good example of this is can be seen in our society. By the time a teacher in our society retires from his or her position their students will have made it out into the real world and taken jobs....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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A life sketch of Plato and his works - If Thales was the first of all the great Greek philosophers, Plato must remain the best known of all the Greeks. The original name of this Athenian aristocrat was Aristiclis, but in his school days he received the nickname "Platon" (meaning "broad") because of his broad shoulders. Plato was born in Athens, Greece to one of the oldest and most distinguished families in the city. He lived with his mother, Perictione, and his father, Ariston (Until Ariston died.) Born in an aristocratic and rich family, Plato’s childhood was indulged within luxury....   [tags: essays research papers] 886 words
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Plato - Philosopher. According to sources, Plato was born on or around May 21, 427 (or 428) B.C. in Athens, the son of Ariston and Perictione, both of Athenian aristocratic ancestry. He lived his whole life in Athens, although he traveled to Sicily and southern Italy on several occasions, and one story says he traveled to Egypt. Little is known of his early years, but he was given the finest education Athens had to offer the scions of its noble families, and he devoted his considerable talents to politics and the writing of tragedy and other forms of poetry....   [tags: essays research papers] 1730 words
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Socrates - Normally I don't care much for books that make me think or question things about my life. However when I read the first chapter of "The Consolations of Philosophy" by Alain de Botton that is exactly what it did. In the first section a broad overview of Socrates was introduced and to be completely honest I did not know much about his other than the fact that he was a well respected ancient philosopher. Instantly I recognized David's famous painting of Socrates being put to death and hoped that I would get some more background because that was all that I really remembered being thought....   [tags: World Literature] 493 words
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E-Book Versus The More Traditional Publishing Methods - When you run a web search on a topic you don't know well, how can you tell when you get authentic information and when you get ideology, superstition, pseudo-science, or even parody. Even though Harrison-Keyes wants to jump diretly into the e-book scene, they have not established a strategy or end state goal. Sometimes you can't, especially if you're downloading pages in a language that isn't your native tongue, in a discipline you haven't mastered, from a culture with a very different sense of humor....   [tags: Internet] 998 words
(2.9 pages)
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Plato's Doctrine of Recollection - Plato's Doctrine of Recollection Essay 1: Plato's Doctrine of Recollection (Sept.29,2000) The 'doctrine of recollection' states that all true knowledge exists implicitly within us, and can be brought to consciousness - made explicit - by recollection. Using the Platonic concepts of 'Forms', 'particulars', 'knowledge' and 'true opinion', this essay explains what can or cannot be recollected, why all knowledge is based on recollection, and why the doctrine does not prove the soul to be immortal....   [tags: Papers] 412 words
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What is Plato's notion of a soul? - ... The soul retains all the knowledge of the previous life but forgets it at birth. The soul belongs to a world of ideas and interacts with the world of perception through the body. The second phase is death or the post-existence of the soul, where the body and the soul are separated from each other. The soul goes back to the invisible realm with all the knowledge it acquired while living in the world of senses waiting to be “transferred” to another body. The body is a tool for the soul to interact with the visible world....   [tags: Philosophy]
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Greek and Christian Models of the Truth - Greek and Christian Models of the Truth In his Philosophical Fragments, Søren Kierkegaard, writing under the pseudonym of Johannes Climacus, poses the question, "How far does the Truth admit of being learned?" (154). A more direct and succinct formulation of Climacus' question is "How is the Truth learned?" since his question does not concern the extent of human knowledge, which "How far" implies, but the possible modes through which one comes, or may come, to know the Truth. For Climacus, there are two possible modes of knowing, or two theories of how one comes to know the Truth: the Greek and the Christian....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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Lextura Dantis - Lextura Dantis Dante varies his presentation greatly throughout Malebolge. Each bolgia has its own particular atmosphere, and the abrupt tonal and structural shifts between them make the move from bolgia to bolgia a medley of styles and techniques. But no shift is so striking as that between the eighth and ninth, in which the reader leaves a bolgia marked by two eloquent, searching dramatic monologues for one characterized by pithy, epigrammatic comments. The heroic exhortation of Ulysses and the sinuous self-revelation of Guido da Montefeltro give way to the truncated, compressed rhetoric of Mohammed, Pier da Medicina, Mosca, and Bertran de Born....   [tags: Dante Bertran Papers]
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Male Menopause: Fact or Fiction? - Male Menopause: Fact or Fiction. "Male menopause is a lot more fun than female menopause. With female menopause you gain weight and get hot flashes. Male menopause - you get to date young girls and drive motorcycles." (11) While 'male menopause' has provided both sexes a variety of jokes and frustration, there are researchers and scientists studying the alleged condition with great seriousness. Those who support the existence of male menopause feel strongly that its affects on the male mind and body should be regarded with the same credence that society attributes to the female menopause....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Contemporary Significance of the Greek Views of Paideia - Contemporary Significance of the Greek Views of Paideia ABSTRACT: We argue that there are three basic views of paideia in ancient Greece. After briefly discussing them, we turn our attention to the contemporary situation. We try to show that the dialogical or Socratic view of paideia can contribute toward a deeper understanding of the contemporary problem of multiculturalism. In this article we will argue first that there are three basic views of paideia in ancient Greece (I). Then after making a brief overview of their fate in the later history (II), we will turn our attention to our contemporary situation and try to show that it is the dialogical or Socratic view of paideia which can contribute to a deeper understanding of the contemporary problem of multiculturalism (III)....   [tags: Philosophy] 2896 words
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George Gemistos Plethon on God: Aristotle vs Plato - George Gemistos Plethon on God: Aristotle vs Plato In this paper I examine George Gemistos Plethon's defense in his De Differentiis of Plato's conception of God as superior to that of Aristotle's. (2) Plethon asserts that the Platonic conception of God is more consistent with Orthodox Christian theology than the Aristotelian conception. This claim is all the more interesting in light of the fact that Plethon is, as it turns out, a pagan. I argue that Plethon takes the position he does because his interpretation of the Platonic God better fits his own neo-pagan theological conceptions....   [tags: Religion Philosophy Argumentative Papers]
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The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues - The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues ABSTRACT: When contemplating the origins of philosophical paideia one is tempted to think of Socrates, perhaps because we feel that Socrates has been a philosophical educator to us all. But it is Plato and his literary genius that we have to thank as his dialogues preserve not just Socratic philosophy, but also the Socratic educational experience. Educators would do well to better understand Plato's pedagogical objectives in the Socratic dialogues so that we may appreciate and utilize them in our own educational endeavors, and so that we may adapt the Socratic experience to new interactive educational technologies....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 2861 words
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On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein - On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein They say that, in his youth, Rabbi Israel studied eight hundred books of the Kabbalah. But the first time he saw the maggid of Mezritch face to face, he instantly knew that he knew nothing at all. I have on my desk one of my daughter's college textbooks, the Mentor edition of Great Dialogues of Plato as translated by W. H. D. Rouse. It cost $4.95. It is a good book with helpful footnotes and a minimum of scholarly obstruction. The editor has included half a dozen dialogues: Ion, Meno, Symposium, Republic, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo....   [tags: Euthyphro] 3504 words
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Pheidias - Pheidias Often credited as being the “greatest” of all Ancient Greek sculptors, Pheidias, was a man gifted with both talent and turmoil. No one specific piece can definitely be attributed to the artist, but historical record suggests that he was the supervisor and main sculptor for works such as the Athena Parthenos and the Zeus for the temple at Olympia. Because many sculptures often attributed to him were designed with large quantities of gold and ivory, he is believed to have been extremely proficient with fine materials....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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Plato's The Crito - There are many instances in Plato's the Crito where Socrates gives reasons for himself to stay in Athens and face his death. Arguments range from that of him being too old to run, to the common response two wrongs don't make a right. The reason I intend to argue against is one Socrates expresses in regards to his obligations to the city he has lived in all his life, and thus the rules that he has subsequently followed throughout that time. In Athens just like any other city, one follows the rules that the respective city has laid down because he/she believes in those laws, or does not and keeps silent....   [tags: essays research papers] 981 words
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Fallibilism and Epistemology - Fallibilism and Epistemology The quest for certainty has gotten epistemology into a lot of hot water, and I propose we give it up as a mistake. We should freely admit we can’t be certain of anything, and move on. It is, of course, a reasonable question whether we can consistently get along without certainty, and even if it is possible, whether there is some terrible price to be paid if we do. I will argue that it is indeed possible to do without any epistemologically useful notion of certainty....   [tags: Fallibilism Philosophy Knowledge Essays] 5045 words
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Plato - Plato (circa 428-c. 347 BC) Plato was born to an aristocratic family in Athens. His father, Ariston, was believed to have descended from the early kings of Athens. Perictione, his mother, was distantly related to the 6th- century BC lawmaker Solon. When Plato was a child, his father died, and his mother married Pyrilampes, who was an associate of the statesman Pericles. As a young man Plato had political ambitions, but he became disillusioned by the political leadership in Athens. He eventually became a disciple of Socrates, accepting his basic philosophy and dialectical style of debate: the pursuit of truth through questions, answers, and additional questions....   [tags: essays research papers] 2476 words
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Strategic Importance of Knowledge Management - Strategic Importance of Knowledge Management Today the world has more and more of free flow of information leading to transfer of knowledge from a person or an organization to others. Whereas this invariably leads to faster development, it also impacts the competitive advantage held by the innovators of processes or technology. It has therefore become strategically important for one and all in business to understand the knowledge, processes and controls to effectively manage the system of sharing and transferring the information in the most beneficial fashion....   [tags: Philosophy Knowledge Management Essays]
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What is Truth - Comparison of Plato and Peirces Philosophy - What is Truth. For thousands of years, mankind has persistently pursued truth, knowledge, and understanding. For most, this pursuit is a driving force which usually doesn’t end until one finds a “truth” that is satisfying to him or her. Even then, however, one may choose to look for an alternate truth that may be even more satisfying to them. This pursuit does not always follow the same path for everyone as there are different ideas as to how truth is actually obtained and which is the best way to obtain it....   [tags: essays research papers] 973 words
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Kafka - Kafka Franz Kafka was born in Prague, Bohemia, July 3, 1883 and died June 3, 1924 of tuberculosis at the age of 40. He came from a middle-class Jewish family. His father was a shopkeeper and tried to climb up the social ladder by working hard at his shop and sending Franz to a prestigious German high school. He went on to get a law degree and worked for two insurance companies (not at the same time) When his .tuberculosis got bad in 1917 he was put on temporary retirement with a pension. German was the language the upper class spoke and by sending Franz to German schools his father tried to disassociate from the lower class Jewish who lived in the ghetto....   [tags: essays papers]
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The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic - The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic This paper discussed The Allegory of The Cave in Plato's Republic, and tries to unfold the messages Plato wishes to convey with regard to his conception of reality, knowledge and education. THE ALLEGORY OF THE CAVE Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" is a story that conveys his theory of how we come to know, or how we attain true knowledge. It is also an introduction into his metaphysical and ethical system. In short, it is a symbolic explanation of his "Theory of the Forms" (or eidos)....   [tags: Papers] 909 words
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Socrates and His Escape - Socrates and His Escape Each one of us has been accused of some kind of act at some point in our lives. Yet those accusations have been terribly mistaken and sometimes there is so little that a person can do to fix that. In this case we are talking about the wonderful philosophist Socrates, a person of many beliefs and ideas. He was a man who dearly believed in justice and doing justice to others. We will examine Socrates' way of thinking and his rationality towards a healthy and logical mind....   [tags: Papers] 1786 words
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