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The Meno - In the Meno, Plato justifies the possibility for one’s mind to uncover knowledge. Knowing one can obtain knowledge motivates the mind to gain more knowledge. Plato explains the theory of recollection by first questioning what virtue is, then demonstrating the process through the questioning of a slave boy. Although a few weaknesses present themselves in Plato’s argument, Plato presents a valid theory on how our minds can obtain knowledge. This paper focuses on exploring Plato’s theory of recollection by examining the strengths and weaknesses of his discussion with Meno....   [tags: essays research papers] 1306 words
(3.7 pages)
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Meno and the Socratic Method - Meno was one of Plato’s earliest of dialogues, written in depth the book is founded around a central question: If virtue can be taught, then how. And if not, then how does virtue come to man, either by nature or some other way. Socrates addresses this inquiry by questioning a person who claims to understand the term’s meaning (Plato's Meno). The purpose of this essay is to relate the Socratic method performed by Socrates in Plato’s dialogue The Apology, to Meno, by illustrating its effect on the character Meno himself. After questioning Meno about virtue, Socrates comes to the conclusion that neither he nor Meno truly know the meaning of the word; he then notes that finding a thorough defin...   [tags: Definition of Virtue, The Apology]
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1410 words
(4 pages)
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Discussion of Virtue in Meno by Socrates - ... A person who does not know how to drive a vehicle himself of herself is unlikely to be capable of teaching another person how to do so. Meno and Socrates fully agree that no one exactly knows what virtue means, and due to this reason, no one can be taught virtue. Socrates claims that if one can be taught virtue, then we ought to know those who teach and those who learn from the lecturer. Further, Socrates argues that teachers for medicine, horsemanship among others, are present and everyone recognizes them as legitimate teachers, but people do not agree on whether Sophists actually do teach virtue....   [tags: knowledge, taught, experience] 677 words
(1.9 pages)
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Defining Excellence in "Meno" - In Plato’s Meno, Socrates purposefully uses ignorance and irony to insufficiently define excellence for Meno. Initially, Meno argues a particular definition, which is a universally inconsistent proof, is sufficient to define excellence. However, Socrates asserts that the definition of excellence must be consistent and applicable to all individuals, by comparing individuals in a society to bees in a colony. Socrates demonstrates the failure of a particular proof to define all constituents of a group....   [tags: Literary Themes] 2005 words
(5.7 pages)
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Plato's Meno and Plato's Republic - 1. In Plato’s Meno, Socrates claims that all learning is actually recollection (80d – 86c). What prompts Socrates to make this claim, and what does he mean by it. As Socrates and Meno were trying to find out the essence of virtues, Socrates said: “The soul, then, as being immortal, and having been born again many times, and having seen all things that exist, whether in this world or in the world below, has knowledge of them all; and it is no wonder that she should be able to call to remembrance all that she ever knew about virtue, and about everything; for as all nature is akin, and the soul has learned all things1.” As he suggested, the soul has already known everything, and thus the acqui...   [tags: Socrate, philosophical analysis] 1624 words
(4.6 pages)
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Meno´s Paradox Presented by Plato - ... Since Meno understands that he really doesn't actually know what virtue is, because he couldn't sufficiently define it at any point, he concludes that there is no possible or reasonable way for him to obtain it. But, it has to be false to come to the conclusion that learning is impossible since a person can constantly obtain some knowledge of things, making this argument an unsound argument. The one way that Meno's paradox can be rid of this fabrication is to interpret the Principle of Charity to the argument....   [tags: socrates, learning, premise] 851 words
(2.4 pages)
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Meno - Shape - "Shape is that which alone of existing things always follows color." "A shape is that which limits a solid; in a word, a shape is the limit of a solid." In the play Meno, written by Plato, there is a point in which Meno asks that Socrates give a definition of shape. In the end of it, Socrates is forced to give two separate definitions, for Meno considers the first to be foolish. As the two definitions are read and compared, one is forced to wonder which, if either of the two, is true, and if neither of them are true, which one has the most logic....   [tags: essays research papers] 1426 words
(4.1 pages)
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Recollection in Plato's Phaedo and Meno - Recollection in Plato's Phaedo and Meno As the earliest philosopher from whom we have written texts, Plato is often misrepresented as merely reproducing Socratic rhetoric. In Meno, one of the first Platonic dialogues, Plato offers his own unique philosophical theory, infused with his mentor's brilliant sophistry. Amidst discussing whether or not virtue can be taught, Meno poses a difficult paradox: How can one be virtuous, or seek virtue, when one cannot know what it is. "How will you aim to search for something you do not know at all?" (Plato, Meno, 80d)....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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596 words
(1.7 pages)
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Meno - There is not a great deal of context that is crucial to understanding the essential themes of the Meno, largely because the dialogue sits nearly at the beginning of western philosophy. Socrates and Plato are working not so much in the context of previous philosophies as in the context of the lack of them. Further, this is very probably one of Plato's earliest surviving dialogues, set in about 402 BCE (by extension, we might presume that it represents Socrates at a relatively early stage in his own thought)....   [tags: essays research papers] 1752 words
(5 pages)
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The Republic: Protagoras, Gorgias, and Meno - The Republic: Protagoras, Gorgias, and Meno One vigorous line of thought in contemporary moral philosophy, which I shall call ‘Neo-Aristotelianism,’ centers on three things: (1) a rejection of traditional enlightenment moral theories like Kantianism and utilitarianism; (2) a claim that another look at the ethical concerns and projects of ancient Greek thought might help us past the impasse into which enlightenment moral theories have left us; (3) more particularly, an attempt to reinterpret Aristotle’s ethical work for the late twentieth-century so as to transcend this impasse....   [tags: Philosophy Morals Neo Aristotelianism Papers]
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4435 words
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Can Virtue Be Acquired? An Examination of the Laches, Meno and Protagoras - ... Therefore, Socrates seeks to find what knowledge the interlocutors do have. This takes the form of questioning the knowledge of virtue. …whether there is any one of us who has knowledge of that about which we are deliberating. [Laches] In order to seek the knowledge of whether virtue can be taught and if any of those present could say one way or another what is the right way to teach one’s sons to be virtuous begins with a series of strongly led questions. Virtue is compared to techne, or craft....   [tags: Socratic dialogues of Plato, philosophy] 2969 words
(8.5 pages)
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Meno Says Courage, Temperance, and Wisdom are Virtues - ... Temperance allows me to have balance, and good judgments which will allows me to have a calm life. It is because of temperance that I am able to remain calm in stressful situations, at the same time having a graceful and classic appearance in spite of the situation that I am faced with. For example I was looking at the news about the two HISD schools that they are closing and how the parents were reacting; they were screaming, cursing and auguring. Although they did not agree with the Board’s decision to close the schools there was a way to get their voice heard without all the displaced anger....   [tags: ethical, principals, morals] 799 words
(2.3 pages)
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Defining Virtue in Socrates' Meno Written by Plato - ... Due to temperance I am able to conduct myself in an orderly manner and not to overreact to stressors. It is because of temperance that I am able to control my actions, thoughts and feelings. Having temperance allow me to not to over react to problems but to handle them with poise and grace. For example on the news they were talking about closing two HISD schools wherein temperance was lacking. Media coverage showed parents reacting in ways that were outrageous. The vision embedded in my memory was one of embarrassment....   [tags: courage, temperance, wisdom] 1036 words
(3 pages)
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Meno's Paradox - Meno's Paradox It is thought that Meno's paradox is of critical importance both within Plato's thought and within the whole history of ideas. It's major importance is that for the first time on record, the possibility of achieving knowledge from the mind's own resources rather than from experience is articulated, demonstrated and seen as raising important philosophical questions. Meno's paradox states: `Why on what lines will you look, Socrates, for a thing of whose nature you know nothing at all....   [tags: Philosophy] 2022 words
(5.8 pages)
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Platos Meno - The questions of what exactly knowledge, virtue and the soul are, are among the most important problems of philosophy The soul may be defined as the ultimate internal principle by which we think, feel, and exist. If there is life after death, the soul must be capable of an existence separate from the body. The mysteries of birth and death, the lapse of conscious life during sleep, even the most common operations of imagination and memory, which abstract a man from his bodily presence even while awake; all such facts suggest the existence of something other....   [tags: essays research papers] 1338 words
(3.8 pages)
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Platos Meno - Plato Meno In Plato’s dialogue Socrates discusses ways in which virtue can be acquired with Meno. Three possibilities are confronted, first that virtue is innate within the human soul. The second suggests that virtue can be taught, and the third possibility is that virtue is a gift from the gods. These ways are debated by Socrates and Meno to a very broad conclusion. Socrates poses the question that virtue may be innate within the human soul. This is to say that all people would have virtue within them, but it is only those who find it that can truly become virtuous....   [tags: essays research papers] 993 words
(2.8 pages)
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MENO: PLATO - "Socrates, can virtue be taught?"1 The dialogue begins with Meno asking Socrates whether virtue can be taught. At the end of the Meno (86d-100b), Socrates attempts to answer the question. This question is prior to the division between opinion and knowledge and provides to unsettle both. Anytus participated in Socrates and Meno conversation about virtue. Socrates claims that if virtue is a kind of knowledge, then it can be learned. If it is something besides a kind of knowledge, it perceptibly cannot be taught....   [tags: Ethics] 611 words
(1.7 pages)
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Platos Meno - The dialogue opens up with Meno asking what virtue is and whether it could be taught. Socrates asks Meno for a general definition of virtue, since as Socrates points out, we cannot figure out if virtue can be taught if we do not have a clear idea what it is. Socrates is looking for a general, or formal definition of virtue, not just examples or instances of it. Socrates wants to know what all the examples of virtue have in common. He wants to know the essence of virtue. Meno initially offers a list of virtues, but Socrates rejects this as a sufficient account....   [tags: essays research papers] 801 words
(2.3 pages)
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Can Virtue be Taught in Plato's Dialogue - ... In the end, Socrates is left nowhere closer to an answer as Meno realizes that he does not know what virtue is. Unable to provide Socrates with a definition of virtue, Meno offers his paradox: “How will you look for it [virtue], Socrates, when you do not know at all what it is. How will you aim to search for something you do not know at all. If you should meet with it, how will you know that this is the thing that you did not know” (Plato 880). Socrates responds by explaining how souls are immortal and have seen all things....   [tags: meno, wisdom, socrates]
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807 words
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The Apology Written By Plato - The Apology Written By Plato, is a detailed account of the trial of Socrates, who was a great philosopher in Athens. Socrates was brought to trial based on charges of “corrupting the youth” and “not believing in the gods” (23d). The people of Athens believed Socrates was corrupting the youth because they simply did not understand his method of inquiry, which consisted of Socrates teaching them to question what they thought to be true. Socrates’ method of inquiry drove his listeners to question their beliefs and often brought them to a state of puzzlement, or a state Plato calls ‘aporia.’ There are many examples of the Socratic method present in The Meno, which is also written by Plato....   [tags: the meno, socrates, athens]
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910 words
(2.6 pages)
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Socrates Elenchus Verses Scientific Theory - The Socrates Elenchus was Socrates way of questioning a proposal. His method is tested and explained in Plato’s Euthyphro and Meno. Socrates’ method is a series of steps that are meant to test or challenge a claim. The scientific method is a modern day method used to test a theory. Both Socrates’ Elenchus and the Scientific method have similarities and differences. Socrates’ method is very alike to the scientific method however; Socrates’ method seems to be less effective than the scientific method....   [tags: Euthyphro, Meno, Plato, Socrates]
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1312 words
(3.7 pages)
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Plato’s Theory of Recollection - In this paper, I will investigate the basic characteristics and properties of Plato’s “recollection” in Meno. In my opinion, Plato uses “recollection” to refute this argument, “whether people know or do not know, discovering is unnecessary.” He believes there is a state between “do not know” and “know”, he calls it “forget”. Therefore, when people are learning or discovering, they are just recollecting things they already forget. In general, when people are learning, they achieve a state of understanding by learning something they consider they do not know....   [tags: characteristics, properties, Meno]
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1478 words
(4.2 pages)
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To Accept or Not Accept Socrates’ Theory of Recollection as Sufficient Answer to Meno’s Paradox - ... The problem of circularity in Socrates’ justification is especially problematic because it highlights the weak foundation that his entire theory is built upon. If the basis of ones theory is unsound there is no reason to accept what has been built up from it. If Socrates’ refutation of Meno’s Paradox is that knowledge is simply recollection, it is necessary that he prove the immortality of the soul independently. Since Socrates has failed to do so, then his theory cannot be accepted a sufficient way of overcoming the paradox....   [tags: immortality, slave, interrogation] 1008 words
(2.9 pages)
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Can Excellence Be Attained? - In Plato’s Meno, Socrates uses ignorance to prove excellence cannot be taught or even attained by human actions. The process involves Socrates purposefully contradicting himself to entice Meno’s focus. Through Socrates, Plato argues particular criteria cannot determine excellence within a collective. Instead, Socrates asserts excellence must be a universal quality and applicable to all individuals, by comparing the human collective to a bee colony. Socrates purposefully fails to use a universally applicable proof for shapes to define a square....   [tags: Philosophy] 1699 words
(4.9 pages)
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Meaning Making and the Importance of Questioning in the Great Books Pantheon - Throughout the Great Books pantheon we have read and discussed the works of various individuals who aim to answer important questions such as, how should one live a life of virtue, what does the most functional society look like, is there any meaning to life at all?, and as students we have been challenged to do more than to take each of these works at face value. In reading any book, it is important to evaluate the content so that the author’s purpose in writing is properly ascertained and so that we may add our own knowledge and opinions to the work, essentially creating and solidifying our own ideals subsequently crafting within ourselves an analytical mind....   [tags: Education, Students, Reading]
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1562 words
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Innate Knowledge and Death - Tapping into innate knowledge is a mystery that has baffled generations of learned men and women denying them the ability to state for certain and true that knowledge is liken unto a shared casserole at a family or company picnic; that everyone can reach within and draw forth the realization of corporeal understanding from the resources of disembodied knowledge and make the same their own. According to the Advanced English Dictionary, knowledge is “the psychological result of perception and learning and reasoning”, while the psyche is “that which is responsible for one's thoughts and feelings; the seat of the faculty of reason”, finally episteme is “the body of ideas that determine the knowl...   [tags: Socrates, Birth, Peace]
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1737 words
(5 pages)
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Plato's View in Human Knowledge - Plato's View in Human Knowledge Plato presents three different views about knowledge in Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus. In Meno's case, Plato believes knowledge as something innate in us when we are born; in his later view, in Republic, Plato believes we perceive things and gain knowledge; and from the last view, in Theaetus, Plato believes knowledge is the combination of a true opinion and a rational opinion. Strangely enough, Plato's views in Meno, Republic, and Theaetetus are similar, regarding the characteristics of knowledge....   [tags: Papers] 1400 words
(4 pages)
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A Hobbesian and Heroic Unreflective Citizenship - A Hobbesian and Heroic Unreflective Citizenship In Meno, Plato asks “what virtue itself is” (Plato 60). This dialogue on virtue between Socrates and Meno ably frames a wider dialogue on ethics between Thomas Hobbes, the Greek heroic tradition, and the sophists of 5th century Athens. Hobbes’ Leviathan and Aristophanes’ The Clouds introduce three classes of ethical actors to respond to Plato’s inquiry: Hobbes’ ethical lemmings, the heroic ethical traditionalists, and the sophist ethical opportunists....   [tags: Hobbes Plato Philosophy Philosophical Essays]
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1870 words
(5.3 pages)
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Can Virtue Be Taught? - In this paper, I will exam Plato’s idea of “virtue is knowledge” to understand “can virtue be taught”. In my opinion, Plato does not strictly proves “virtue is knowledge”; instead, he believes that “virtue is the gift of God”. “Can virtue be taught?” This is question Plato is trying to answer in Meno. This problem is important and serious, because its answer directly concerns a question about how we understand and position education. The reason for Plato making this question is related to his opposition to the wise men....   [tags: Plato, Virtue is knowledge, ideas]
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993 words
(2.8 pages)
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Plato and Locke's Views on an Innate Idea - Plato and Locke's Views on an Innate Idea        What is an innate idea?  This can be defined as some idea or mental representation that is produced by outside perception or created anew by our imagination. It exists in the mind in virtue of the nature of the human mind.  According to Plato most if not all of our knowledge is innate. However, John Locke feels that we do not have any innate ideas.  Then the question arises of who is right or are they both wrong.  In this paper I will attempt to examine the conflicting views of Plato and Locke....   [tags: Philosophy essays]
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2119 words
(6.1 pages)
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Can virtue be taught? - lthough today's society includes much technology and new things are supposedly being discovered every day, many age old questions still remain unanswered; questions such as: "Can virtue be taught?" This question is examined in detail throughout Plato's Meno, and although the play leaves the question as to what virtue is unanswered, Socrates attempts an answer to Meno's question. Although he is not particularly keen on answering whether virtue can be taught without first having a complete understanding of what virtue is, he attempts to please Meno by solving this in the way that geometers conduct their investigations, through a hypothesis....   [tags: essays research papers] 556 words
(1.6 pages)
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Lenses of Education - ... Socrates responds by saying that this is how he learns, through a series of questions, searching, and in the end gaining answers through recollection (pg. 71, 81e). Socrates does not preach what he does not know such as virtue. Rather than pretending to know about it he tries to search for the answer and in doing so he believe he is recollecting information from his soul’s past lives (pg. 71, 81d-e). Therefore Socrates determines that he could not be a teacher because he does not teach people new information but rather, he helps them to recollect information that they already know (pg.72, 82)....   [tags: Socrates philosophical analysis] 1038 words
(3 pages)
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Platonic Paradox - To research Plato's paradox in the Meno, we can first consult the definition of what platonism is. Websters defines platonism as "actual things are copies of transcendent ideas and that these ideas are the objects of true knowledge apprehended by reminiscence." For this essay, we will assume that trancendency is- "that which is beyond comprehension", and reminiscence as "past experience". The Meno is a dialogue between Socrates, a scholar and Meno, who eventually became an explorer....   [tags: essays research papers] 1721 words
(4.9 pages)
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Ignorance is Not an Excuse - Ignorance is Not an Excuse We only choose what we think is good and if anyone chooses evil it must be through ignorance. Plato believes that we always choose good unless we are ignorant. Plato claims being ignorant would be the only excuse for choosing evil. His views of this are apparent in the Meno. As I read up on whether or not we deliberately choose evil I realized there are many sides, many ways to answer this question. My opinion is not as clear as I thought. In this paper I will go through numerous writings on this subject, such as the Meno....   [tags: Papers] 987 words
(2.8 pages)
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The Chemistry of Knowledge - The Chemistry of Knowledge Hippeas thought he had all the answers. “I have never found any man who was my superior in anything,” he boasted. Then he meets Socrates. Though he had made thousands of public speeches about virtue, a dialogue with the wisest of Athenians leads Hippeas to confess that he “cannot even say what [virtue] is” (Hippeas 70). Lesser Hippeas discredits Hippeas but offers little more than a negative definition of knowledge. Meno, Phaedo, and the Republic provide a more comprehensive discussion of the definition, the good and the teaching of knowledge....   [tags: Philosophy Knowledge Knowing Plato Essays]
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1891 words
(5.4 pages)
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Menos Paradox - What is Meno’s Paradox. First, who is Meno. The Meno is one of the earlier Platonic writings, which include Socrates and which look to try to define an ethic, in this case virtue. Meno himself is seemingly a man who is greedy for wealth, greedy for power, ambitious, and a back-stabber who tries to play everything to his own advantage. Meno starts by questioning Socrates. Can virtue be taught. Socrates says to Meno, well, what makes a virtue a virtue. Meno comes to the borrowed point that virtue is “to find joy in beautiful things and have power”....   [tags: essays research papers] 690 words
(2 pages)
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The Theory of Innate Virtue - Throughout the dialogue of “Meno”, Socrates inquires what virtue is and whether virtue is innate, acquired through learning, or received as a gift from the gods (Jowett, 1949). After some discussion with Meno, Socrates first proposes the theory that virtue is innate. Subsequently the knowledge of innate virtue is of a priori knowledge, which is in turn contingent on a priori justification (Russell, 2011). A priori knowledge is knowledge that rests on a priori justification. A priori justification is a type of epistemic justification that is, in some sense, independent of experience....   [tags: Philosophy]
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999 words
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Knowledge Rather than Correct Opinion: Analyzing the Nature of Augustine’s Confession and Reflection - ... Correct opinion, in this sense is not stationary, and it only transforms to knowledge by recollection. Correct opinion is more like “temporary knowledge”, which seems superficial until evidence is found to support it. The concept of “tied down” is particularly interesting. Correct opinion does not belong to a person until that person him/herself manages to fully understand and explain the meaning of that opinion, which we then call knowledge. Therefore, knowledge, according to Socrates is of higher level than correct opinion, for it belongs to the person who owns it and does not vanish as time evolves....   [tags: Christianity, Truth]
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997 words
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How Does the Embryo Take Form and Differentiate to Become an Organised Organism?” - ... A number of methods were used to show this discovery. Embryos were analysed during a whole mount in situ hybridisation, and also by histological techniques (Nonaka & Tanaka, 1998). To view the nodal cilia, fluorescent microscopy using a confocal laser microscope, and immunoelectron microscopy using electron microscopy was used without electron staining (Nonaka & Tanaka, 1998). Electron microscopy was also used with electron staining to view the embryo (Nonaka & Tanaka, 1998). Fluorescent latex beads were used to visualise nodal flow, and the image was projected to a camera, where the fluoresced beads could highlight the nodal flow and differentiate it from all other structures (Nonaka &...   [tags: genes, scientific community] 1233 words
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On the Chopin ballade in g minor - The purpose of this end-of-course article is to offer a comprehensive analysis of Fredyryk Chopin’s Ballade in G Minor, Op. 23., Nr. 1 as edited by G. Henle USA. This article will discuss the comprehensive elements of Chopin’s Ballade in G minor and will consider the issues of form and tonal schemes. Said to have been inspired by the poet Adam Mickiewicz, 1 Chopin composed the Ballade in G Minor between 1835-36, during his earliest tenure in Paris. Chopin’s Ballade in G Minor has been one of the most popular and more frequently programmed of his four Ballades and exists as a staple for many of the greatest pianists of today....   [tags: Classical Music] 1688 words
(4.8 pages)
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Plato's Theory of Knowledge - “If the truth of all things always existed in the soul, then the soul is immortal” (The Philosophical Journey 89). This states that since the soul has all knowledge integrated, one recollects this knowledge through situations in an individual’s life and use one’s reasoning. With the dialogues of the Meno and Phaedo, Plato discusses the ideas of recollection and immortality of the soul in general. As well, the Republic, through the three different situations shown, Plato shows the ideas of the forms and what is real and what is not....   [tags: Philosophy, Greek]
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2742 words
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Beneficial Platonic Perplexity - ... With this being noted, philosophy would no longer make progress. No one would need to think dynamically to move past something such as a situation of perplexity. An example of this plays out in Plato’s Laches while attempting to define courage. Even though the men in the context cannot come up with an exact definition of courage, they do collectively understand what courage is not. Laches: “Socrates, although I am not really accustomed to arguments of this kind…I am really getting annoyed at being unable to express what I think in this fashion…I can’t pin it down in words and say what it is” (SOURCE) Socrates: ”Then we have not discovered, Nicias, what courage is.” (199e) This eventually...   [tags: knowledge, aporeia, context, perplexity] 1048 words
(3 pages)
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Is Knowledge Worth Seeking - Socrates argued that actively seeking out knowledge leads to the ability of man to moderate his behavior accordingly. If one examines a situation thoughtfully, and from several angles, the most logical course of action will present itself. By exercising this method of reasoning a person becomes wise. Socrates would call this the ability to govern the qualities of your soul properly and it is undoubtedly what he sought. The process brings out the virtuous qualities in man and allows him to make decisions based on truth, which leads ultimately to good....   [tags: essays research papers] 1415 words
(4 pages)
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Socrates: One of the Most Important Figures in Western Philosophy - Socrates was one of the most influential thinkers in the West, even though he left no writings of himself, it was possible to reconstruct an accurate account of his life from the writings of his Greek students because he always engaged them. He was a man with a very strong conviction because he lived his life for the pursuit of knowledge, true wisdom, God’s will, and piety. Though he never wrote anything, his soul source of knowledge about him came from one of his students, Plato. Socrates was born in 469 B.C....   [tags: Socrates Essays]
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what is knowledge - Many philosophers have inquired about what is knowledge. Most believe that knowledge is attained by being taught, and not suppressed in our mind since birth. In Plato’s Meno, Socrates argues in favor of the pre existing knowledge, that knowledge is essentially suppressed, and is brought to light through questioning. The argument, which comes from this view of “knowledge”, is that if you know what it is you are inquiring about, you don’t need to inquire, because you already know. However, if you do not know what it is you are inquiring about, you are unable to inquire, because you do not know what you inquiring....   [tags: essays research papers] 640 words
(1.8 pages)
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The Immortality of the Soul - Plato has roused many readers with the work of a great philosopher by the name of Socrates. Through Plato, Socrates lived on generations after his time. A topic of Socrates that many will continue to discuss is the idea of “an immortal soul”. Although there are various works and dialogues about this topic it is found to be best explained in The Phaedo. It is fair to say that the mind may wonder when one dies what exactly happens to the beloved soul, the giver of life often thought of as the very essence of life does it live on beyond the body, or does it die with it....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1430 words
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Devious Art of Cunning - The aesthetics of being taken in by a tall tale or someone’s superior wit, is explained by simple human curiosity. We love to be entertained by suspense, comedy, pain, sadness, hurt and etc. Not only are these emotions observed, but experienced by the audience. That is what entices the human race. To be summoned into a story and letting the imagination explore through the words, letting it create a life of it’s own inside the audience. That alone is so devious, but there is so much more to the cunning within and surrounding a tale....   [tags: Philosophy] 1098 words
(3.1 pages)
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An Apologia of Xenophon - “Anabasis” is the Xenophon’s account of the expedition for Cyrus against Persian and the marching home of Greeks. The Greek title of Xenophon’s work, “Anabasis”, referred to a march up country, away from the coast. The title applies only to the first of its seven books. It all ends with the death of Cyrus at the Battle of Cuxana. The Greek mercenary soldiers were left stranded in the “barbarian” world. The rest of the books involves with tales of the Greeks’ discipline, leadership and courage during their journey home....   [tags: The Greeks, Military, War] 1089 words
(3.1 pages)
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Ethnographic Interests of Xenophon - Xenophon, the son of Athenian wealthy family, was exiled because of his assistance for the enemies of Athenians. He claimed that he was yearning for a thrilling adventure; as a result, he decided to join Cyrus’s expedition against his brother Artaxerxes, the Persian King along with the Greek mercenaries. Though Anabasis is more about the record of the Greeks’’ struggle and hardship during their retreat in the hostile territory, Xenophon writes Anabasis as his interest of ethnography. Ethnography is a study of human cultures....   [tags: Greek Military, Tactics, Athens] 1292 words
(3.7 pages)
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Runaway Statues: Platonic Lessons on the Limits of an Analogy - Runaway Statues: Platonic Lessons on the Limits of an Analogy ABSTRACT: Plato’s best-known distinction between knowledge and opinion occurs in the Meno. The distinction rests on an analogy that compares the acquisition and retention of knowledge to the acquisition and retention of valuable material goods. But Plato saw the limitations of the analogy and took pains to warn against learning the wrong lessons from it. In this paper, I will revisit this familiar analogy with a view to seeing how Plato both uses and distances himself from it....   [tags: Philosophy Plato Analogy Essays]
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Aristotle Vs. Plato Learning Is Recollection - What alternative does Aristotle offer to Plato’s claim that learning is recollection. Where would Aristotle locate the mistake in Plato’s argument in The Phaedo. In his dialogues The Phaedo and Meno, Plato, through the form of Socrates, puts forth the idea that all learning is recollection. In The Phaedo, to prove that the soul is immortal, Socrates asserts the view that all learning is recollection and we simply need to be reminded of facts that our immortal souls are aware of. In Meno, Socrates attempts to show the truth of this belief by doing complex geometry with a nearby slave boy....   [tags: essays research papers] 649 words
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The Metaphysical One in Platonic and Augustinian Thoughts - The legacy of Plato left its distinctive brand of influence on St. Augustine's beliefs and writings, of this there is no doubt. In Confessions, Augustine himself professed that it was the Platonic books that enabled him to attach himself to his God. However, it is evident that Augustine re-augmented much of the Platonic thoughts and, combining them with the early Christian doctrines, configured the hybrid into what became the foundation of Catholicism. The differences—as well as similarities—that exist between the two thought systems can be dissected from two points: the nature of the metaphysical supreme One and its relationships with the Many....   [tags: Philosophy Essays] 2190 words
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A life sketch of Plato and his works - If Thales was the first of all the great Greek philosophers, Plato must remain the best known of all the Greeks. The original name of this Athenian aristocrat was Aristiclis, but in his school days he received the nickname "Platon" (meaning "broad") because of his broad shoulders. Plato was born in Athens, Greece to one of the oldest and most distinguished families in the city. He lived with his mother, Perictione, and his father, Ariston (Until Ariston died.) Born in an aristocratic and rich family, Plato’s childhood was indulged within luxury....   [tags: essays research papers] 886 words
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A Comparison of Classic and Contemporary Philosophers - A Comparison of Classic And Contemporary Philosophers Why is it so important that young children in our society receive a good education. The answer to that question is very simple; because they are our future. The old saying “the youth of today are the leaders off tomorrow” holds more truth than many people realize. By giving children a good start at an early age we are only helping ourselves as well as the children. A good example of this is can be seen in our society. By the time a teacher in our society retires from his or her position their students will have made it out into the real world and taken jobs....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
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E-Book Versus The More Traditional Publishing Methods - When you run a web search on a topic you don't know well, how can you tell when you get authentic information and when you get ideology, superstition, pseudo-science, or even parody. Even though Harrison-Keyes wants to jump diretly into the e-book scene, they have not established a strategy or end state goal. Sometimes you can't, especially if you're downloading pages in a language that isn't your native tongue, in a discipline you haven't mastered, from a culture with a very different sense of humor....   [tags: Internet] 998 words
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Addressing the Problem of Evil in On Free Choice of the Will by Augustine - In “On Free Choice of the Will”, Augustine indicates the importance of his beliefs and opinions of human nature and of God. He thinks as greatly of God as possible and centralizes his thoughts of goodness with the concept of being/form (God); he also gives a description of how God’s rightness can be interpreted clearly through the evil doings of the world. One of the biggest and most difficult problems facing people is the problem of doing evil. If God is being, unchanging, eternal and all-powerful, then how is it that people do evil....   [tags: philosophy, god, sin]
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Virtue is not Different for a Man and a Woman as Plato Suggests - ... A person can acquire virtue by the values and morals being taught or a sense of behavior, and habits are being formed whether they are good, bad, right or wrong as children. Many of us have formulated our views based on what we have heard, seen, or were taught to believe. I feel that Social class and culture has a great deal to do with some of the displaced morals and values such as ethical subjectivism according to Jean Jacques Rousseau “what a person feels is right is right, and what a person feel is wrong is wrong” (rousseau p.223)....   [tags: values, morals, beliefs]
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Exploring the New World through Antonin Dvorak's Music - Antonin Dvorak was one of the leading composers of the late Romantic period and one of many composers that utilized portions of music from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds in his compositions. The idea of Music Nationalism can be found in many of his works, especially in his Symphony no. 9 in E minor “from the New World”, which incorporates ideas from the American culture. Antonin Dvorak was born on September 8, 1841 in the small village of Nelahozeves. Dvorak began his early music education training when he was eight years old at the local school in his village....   [tags: late romantic period]
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What is Plato's notion of a soul? - Greeks started to wonder about the living things and their connection with the divine. Many philosophers had different beliefs towards the connection between body, soul and divine. Plato was the first man to ask about the existence of the soul and he came to the conclusion that the soul and the body are complementary, yet absolutely different from each other. The soul is the organ that connects the body and the divine. The body is an instrument of perception to the soul. The body without the soul is just a corpse....   [tags: Philosophy]
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The Failure of Public Education in America - What is the real meaning behind (NCLB) No Child left behind, what is the main purpose. The NCLB was put in place to give students the chance to receive a fair education no matter what the race, gender, income background, or even if they have a disability. It is made up of four major parts accountability, flexibility, research-based education, and parent options. Students are to be tested on their math and reading/language arts from the 3rd grade to the 8th grade only being tested once while attending high school within the four years....   [tags: no chilld left behind]
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Does Perfection Exist?: Plato´s Theory of Forms - ... All objects are only shadows of their true forms. His theory further states every group of objects that have the same defying properties must have an ideal form. For example, in the class of wine glasses there must be one in particular that is the ideal wine glass. All others would fall under this ideal form. Plato's Theory of Forms draws parallels to The Allegory of the Cave, highlighting the concept of human beings being ignorant to true perfection. In the writing Plato uses symbols to convey a veiled meaning....   [tags: philosophers, metaphysics, throught, ideal]
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Plato's Vision of the Ideal State - Plato's Vision Of The Ideal State As Presented In The Republic The concept of questioning meaning of life, the universe and everything has become debauched in modern society. But there is an exigency for and a value in the procedure of reasoning through aspects of our experience beginning with moral principles to existence. It can, for ordinary peoples as much as for professional philosophers, enlivening, vivid, and developmental. Plato is one of the most influential thinkers in human history. His philosophies have made a far-reaching impact on the human societies and have laid the foundation of many avenues of knowledge....   [tags: selfishness, utopia, God] 1275 words
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The Negative Impact of Helicopter Parenting - A recent study was conducted to observe the parental and behavioral connection of helicopter parenting and establish measure of helicopter parenting that was noticeable from other types of parental control. The participants of this study included 438 undergraduate students from four universities in the United States. Three hundred twenty of which were women and 118 were men, and at least one of their parents. The results shown revealed that helicopter parenting carried a separate aspect from both behavioral and psychological control, and that it was positively associated with behavioral and psychological control....   [tags: Helicopter Parenting Essays] 1000 words
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Gorgias: The Father of Sophistry - Gorgias, was a Greek sophist, Sicilian philosopher, orator, and rhetorician. He is known as the first and original Nihilist, famously saying, “Nothing exists. If anything did exist it could not be known. If it was known, the knowledge of it would be incommunicable” (Gorgias), for this reason he earned the nickname, “The Nihilist.” He is known as the father of sophistry. According to The Encyclopedia of Philosophy contributor, Francis Higgins, sophistry is, “a movement of philosophy that emphasizes the real-world use of rhetoric concerning civic and political life” (Higgins)....   [tags: The Nihilist]
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Plato´s Philosophy in The Rupublic - Plato was born around 428 BC, in Athens. As a child, his father died, his mother was a widow: someone who lost their husband and is single however, that did not last too long, because his mother remarried to a man named Pyrilampes. Plato was at birth, named Aristolcles, and had the title of Plankton. He had great interest in poetry and music; he was especially good in philosophy, which dealt with theoretical principles, and a field of philosophy called epistemology that explained human knowledge, and nature....   [tags: courage, justice, ideas, live, writings]
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Science and Empirical Observation - Empirical observation is the body of science. But what ties facts and figures together. It is one thing to postulate and investigate an inkling. It is quite another to develop a scientific theory that harmoniously explains how all the evidence comes together. Ultimately, science must prove the theory nevertheless, even an inaccurate theory provides a scientific model to contrast new discovery. Computers only understand one and zero—yes and no. However, the human mind can also accommodate “maybe”....   [tags: god, church, scientific theory]
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The Doctrine of Recollection - Socrates’ Doctrine of Recollection is invalid because of the flawed procedure that was employed to prove it, its inability to apply to all types of knowledge, and the weakness of the premises that it is based on. In Plato’s Meno, Socrates suggested that knowledge comes from recollection, or, in Greek, anamnesis. He believes that the knowledge is already implanted in the human mind, and by recollection, men can retrieve back knowledge. There are two stages to this: first, a “stirring up” of true, innate opinions, then, a conversion of the knowledge (Gulley)....   [tags: socrates, knowledge, premises]
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Developing My Identity - “Pay no mind to what other people say; whatever makes an individual happy is what he or she should do.” This quote comes from my grandmother, who tries her best to teach me about an individual’s personal identity. An individual’s identity represents who he or she truly is; it is something that allows a specific person to stand out from the crowd. During an individual’s life, he or she will come across many obstacles that will shape her or his being and will further shape her or him into someone with particular traits, or an identity....   [tags: Searching for Identity Essay]
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Plato's Doctrine of Recollection - Plato's Doctrine of Recollection Essay 1: Plato's Doctrine of Recollection (Sept.29,2000) The 'doctrine of recollection' states that all true knowledge exists implicitly within us, and can be brought to consciousness - made explicit - by recollection. Using the Platonic concepts of 'Forms', 'particulars', 'knowledge' and 'true opinion', this essay explains what can or cannot be recollected, why all knowledge is based on recollection, and why the doctrine does not prove the soul to be immortal....   [tags: Free Example Essays] 412 words
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Philosophy - Philosophy When I was born, I did not know the difference between right and wrong. Now, I do. The word philosophy means the love of knowledge. One type of knowledge is propter quid, which ask the question why or how. In this paper, I will demonstrate how Socrates, Hume and Aristotle, three well known philosophers, would explain how I acquired this knowledge in relation to the principles of right and wrong. Socrates is the first philosopher, I will discuss....   [tags: Papers] 1426 words
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What is Truth - Comparison of Plato and Peirces Philosophy - What is Truth.      For thousands of years, mankind has persistently pursued truth, knowledge, and understanding. For most, this pursuit is a driving force which usually doesn’t end until one finds a “truth” that is satisfying to him or her. Even then, however, one may choose to look for an alternate truth that may be even more satisfying to them. This pursuit does not always follow the same path for everyone as there are different ideas as to how truth is actually obtained and which is the best way to obtain it....   [tags: essays research papers] 973 words
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Contemporary Significance of the Greek Views of Paideia - Contemporary Significance of the Greek Views of Paideia ABSTRACT: We argue that there are three basic views of paideia in ancient Greece. After briefly discussing them, we turn our attention to the contemporary situation. We try to show that the dialogical or Socratic view of paideia can contribute toward a deeper understanding of the contemporary problem of multiculturalism. In this article we will argue first that there are three basic views of paideia in ancient Greece (I). Then after making a brief overview of their fate in the later history (II), we will turn our attention to our contemporary situation and try to show that it is the dialogical or Socratic view of paideia which can con...   [tags: Philosophy] 2896 words
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George Gemistos Plethon on God: Aristotle vs Plato - George Gemistos Plethon on God: Aristotle vs Plato In this paper I examine George Gemistos Plethon's defense in his De Differentiis of Plato's conception of God as superior to that of Aristotle's. (2) Plethon asserts that the Platonic conception of God is more consistent with Orthodox Christian theology than the Aristotelian conception. This claim is all the more interesting in light of the fact that Plethon is, as it turns out, a pagan. I argue that Plethon takes the position he does because his interpretation of the Platonic God better fits his own neo-pagan theological conceptions....   [tags: Religion Philosophy Argumentative Papers]
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The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues - The Educational Value of Plato's Early Socratic Dialogues ABSTRACT: When contemplating the origins of philosophical paideia one is tempted to think of Socrates, perhaps because we feel that Socrates has been a philosophical educator to us all. But it is Plato and his literary genius that we have to thank as his dialogues preserve not just Socratic philosophy, but also the Socratic educational experience. Educators would do well to better understand Plato's pedagogical objectives in the Socratic dialogues so that we may appreciate and utilize them in our own educational endeavors, and so that we may adapt the Socratic experience to new interactive educational technologies....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 2861 words
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The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic - The Allegory of the Cave in Plato's Republic This paper discussed The Allegory of The Cave in Plato's Republic, and tries to unfold the messages Plato wishes to convey with regard to his conception of reality, knowledge and education. THE ALLEGORY OF THE CAVE Plato's "Allegory of the Cave" is a story that conveys his theory of how we come to know, or how we attain true knowledge. It is also an introduction into his metaphysical and ethical system. In short, it is a symbolic explanation of his "Theory of the Forms" (or eidos)....   [tags: Papers] 909 words
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Greek and Christian Models of the Truth - Greek and Christian Models of the Truth In his Philosophical Fragments, Søren Kierkegaard, writing under the pseudonym of Johannes Climacus, poses the question, "How far does the Truth admit of being learned?" (154). A more direct and succinct formulation of Climacus' question is "How is the Truth learned?" since his question does not concern the extent of human knowledge, which "How far" implies, but the possible modes through which one comes, or may come, to know the Truth. For Climacus, there are two possible modes of knowing, or two theories of how one comes to know the Truth: the Greek and the Christian....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein - On Euthyphro: Notes by Sidney Fein They say that, in his youth, Rabbi Israel studied eight hundred books of the Kabbalah. But the first time he saw the maggid of Mezritch face to face, he instantly knew that he knew nothing at all. I have on my desk one of my daughter's college textbooks, the Mentor edition of Great Dialogues of Plato as translated by W. H. D. Rouse. It cost $4.95. It is a good book with helpful footnotes and a minimum of scholarly obstruction. The editor has included half a dozen dialogues: Ion, Meno, Symposium, Republic, Apology, Crito, and Phaedo....   [tags: Euthyphro] 3504 words
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Male Menopause: Fact or Fiction? - Male Menopause: Fact or Fiction. "Male menopause is a lot more fun than female menopause. With female menopause you gain weight and get hot flashes. Male menopause - you get to date young girls and drive motorcycles." (11) While 'male menopause' has provided both sexes a variety of jokes and frustration, there are researchers and scientists studying the alleged condition with great seriousness. Those who support the existence of male menopause feel strongly that its affects on the male mind and body should be regarded with the same credence that society attributes to the female menopause....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
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Strategic Importance of Knowledge Management - Strategic Importance of Knowledge Management Today the world has more and more of free flow of information leading to transfer of knowledge from a person or an organization to others. Whereas this invariably leads to faster development, it also impacts the competitive advantage held by the innovators of processes or technology. It has therefore become strategically important for one and all in business to understand the knowledge, processes and controls to effectively manage the system of sharing and transferring the information in the most beneficial fashion....   [tags: Philosophy Knowledge Management Essays]
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Socrates as Philosopher King -         History is ripe with stories of great men.  Hundreds of politicians, philosophers, performers, and writers have left a unique stamp on humanity.  But only a select few can be said to have "changed history."  The legendary Athenian, Socrates, was one such figure.  Socrates ushered in an era of philosophical inquiry that still lingers to this day.  In Book Seven of Plato's The Republic, Socrates outlines his perfect regime.  According to Socrates, an enlightened "Philosopher-King" must rule such a regime.  Now suppose this Republic actually came into being, and Socrates was asked to rule it as a Philosopher King.  Would he?  Answering this begs three important questions:  Is Socrates...   [tags: Philosophy essays]
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