Search Results

Free Essays
Unrated Essays
Better Essays
Stronger Essays
Powerful Essays
Term Papers
Research Papers

Your search returned over 400 essays for "malaria"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>

These results are sorted by most relevant first (ranked search). You may also sort these by color rating or essay length.

Title Length Color Rating  
DDT & Malaria: Observation and Background - Malaria is a a terrible and sometimes lethal disease caused by a parasite which feed on human and bite them (1). And mosquito is one of the parasite, especially for female mosquitoes which are affected, they transmit the organisms from their saliva into the circulatory system of a person. If people get malaria, they will become very sick, they may get high fevers, shaking chills, and flu-like lillness (1). Malaria is a serious problem in developing countries whith warm and moisture climates, that’s why in this places, it is a major cause of death....   [tags: malaria, ddt, insects, mosquitos]
:: 10 Works Cited
1256 words
(3.6 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Optimizing Chloroquine to Make a Better Drug to Fight Malaria - Optimizing Chloroquine to Make a Better Drug to Fight Malaria Abstract: Malaria has haunted man for centuries. Humanities experiments in drugs allowed for the discovery of chloroquine, perhaps the most successful cure against the parasitic infection. However, a new strain of malaria, plasmodium falciparum, has proven to be resistant against chloroquine and other cures we have for this virulent disease. Should man then cast aside this antique drug. Not before trying to optimize it to once again combat malaria....   [tags: Biology Medical Malaria Disease] 1415 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Analysis of Malaria - Malaria is one of the most prevalent and serious illnesses that affects a majority of the world’s population. The disease spreads through a specific type of mosquito, belonging to the genus anopheles, which has the ability to transmit the malaria parasite into human body while feeding on the human blood. Malaria is caused by the single celled, protozoan parasite called plasmodium. Plasmodium has a complex life cycle and is able to get into the human cells at a very fast rate. It is able to evade immune responses as it produces multiple surface proteins that keep varying in type and signals....   [tags: Vaccines, Affected Areas, WHO]
:: 15 Works Cited
754 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Malaria in Zambia - Handing the underweight two-year old back to her mother, the clinic nurse turned to the battered register and wrote: malaria. When they arrived at Lusuntha clinic on the eastern border of Zambia earlier that morning, the mother explained that the child had spent three days suffering from diarrhea. Lethargic and miserable, she looked like she was on the verge of tears but her body, so extremely dehydrated, probably didn’t have any left. The nurse turned to me and asked me to hand her a regimen of Coartem – the World Health Organization’s “Essential Medicine” used to treat malaria....   [tags: Test, Treatment, Nursing] 910 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Causes of Malaria and Treatment Options - Did you know that every 30 seconds a child who is infected with Malaria dies. (Malaria, World Health Organization) Over 20% of the world population is at risk at getting Malaria each day. If you want a better idea on what 20% of the world population is, it’s over 1.3 billion people. Hundreds of millions of people are infected with Malaria right now, and it can lead to millions of deaths each year. (Malaria: Past and Present) However you cannot get this disease in certain places. Some of the countries such as Australia and North America are some of the areas you cannot get Malaria in, unless you travel to areas that have Malaria and come back infected....   [tags: medical] 1756 words
(5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Signs and Symptoms of Malaria - Malaria Introduction to Malaria Malaria is a deadly disease, responsible for 300,000,000 malaria-infected people and over a million deaths annually. It is caused by malaria parasites that have infected mosquitoes, so the disease is transferred into a person’s blood when the mosquito bites us. Malaria-diseased people experience fevers and chills that lingers every few days. The diagnosis of malaria is identified in their blood along with the symptoms. Malaria requires different treatment for mild cases or more severe ones, like mild circumstances usually need an oral medication, but serious conditions need a hospital visit....   [tags: Disease, Deaths] 853 words
(2.4 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Epidemiological Trend of Malaria in Odisha - BACKGROUND Since ancient times, malaria has been posing a grave threat to the mankind in terms of morbidity, mortality and economic adversity. This infectious disease is caused by protozoan parasites from Plasmodium family and transmitted by infected female Anopheles mosquitoes. It afflicts people from all age groups across tropical and sub- tropical regions in the world[1]. Presently, malaria is endemic in 104 countries[2].Though, in the past decade the fight against this preventable disease has been intensified worldwide and as a result , during 2000-2012 the global malarial mortality and incidence rates have declined by about 42% and 25% respectively; this deadly disease has still infli...   [tags: anopheles mosquitoes, protozoan disease]
:: 20 Works Cited
881 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Life Cycle of the Malaria Parasite - What is the disease: Malaria is a mosquito-borne infectious disease to humans and other animals which is caused by parasitic protozoans. You develop it by a female infected mosquito with parasites transmitting its bite through the skin. This can cause severe redness on the area and continuous itching which can cause the bite to inflame. Malaria is quite rare in countries such as the United States, but it is most commonly found in countries such as Southern Asia and Africa. It is said that there is 20 species around the world but there are 4 most common species that cause the disease in humans a few are known as: Plasmodium falciparum, this is the most deadly out of all 4 to humans this lies...   [tags: mosquito, parasitic protozoans]
:: 4 Works Cited
951 words
(2.7 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Deforestation, A Possible Cause of Malaria - A common fact that reminds people everyday of how important the rain-forests are to the world is that they provide about three-fourths of the world’s oxygen. So what if this source of life to the planet is removed or even destroyed by Earth’s inhabitants. The obvious answer is that species won’t be able to survive without an oxygen source, but the less obvious is what is happening now with deforestation of the forests, and specifically rain-forests. In these rain-forest regions, such as Vietnam, the Amazon, and Sub-Saharan Africa, the effects of deforestation can be seen dramatically....   [tags: Deforestation Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1038 words
(3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Fight Against Malaria - The Fight Against Malaria The scorching temperature of the hot sun beats down on the sandy ground. Flies and mosquitoes roam the air, and the sound of suffering children fill the atmosphere. This is sub-saharan Africa, and the noise of the children in agony is due to a deadly parasitic disease known as malaria. Every year, nearly one million deaths occur because of it (World of Health). Fortunately, this sickness was eradicated in the U.S. through various techniques. They used DDT utilization to areas that were known to have malaria present there in latter years....   [tags: mosquitores, children, sub-saharan africa]
:: 7 Works Cited
1306 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Malaria in Sub-Saharan Africa - Malaria is blood disease caused by a parasite called Plasmodium. This disease occurs widely in poor, subtropical and tropical regions of the world. One subtropical region that has been greatly affected by this disease is Sub-Saharan Africa. According to Olowookere, Adeleke, Kuteyi, and Mbakwe (2013) malaria is one of the leading causes of death and illness in sub-Saharan Africa. It is important to be aware of the impacts this disease carries and how it has greatly affected millions of people. This paper will explain the impacts of Malaria and discuss, compare, and contrast the malaria research conducted by various researchers and reflect on the issue....   [tags: blood disease, plasmodium, mortality, impact]
:: 4 Works Cited
861 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
DDT and Malaria Control - Introduction Nearly half a billion people are infected with malaria each year and more than a million people die from this disease. Malaria is transmitted through the bite of a female Anopheles mosquito infected with malaria parasites. When the parasites enter the human body, it slowly destroys the body’s red blood cells, eventually killing the patient if left without undergoing immediate treatment (Stanmeyer 2007). One of the means employed to counter the spread of malaria is through the use of DDT as an insecticide to kill the mosquitoes before they are able to infect more people....   [tags: Diseases/Disorders]
:: 10 Works Cited
1175 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Impacts of Malaria - The Impacts of Malaria Approximately 300 million people are affected worldwide by malaria and between 1 and 1.5 million people die from it every year. Malaria is now mainly confined to Africa, Asia and Latin America having previously been widespread across the world. The problems of controlling malaria in these countries are heightened due to insufficient health structures and poor socioeconomic conditions. The situation has become more complicated over the last few years with the increase in resistance to the drugs normally used to combat the parasite that causes the disease....   [tags: Papers] 1208 words
(3.5 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Preventing Malaria - Preventing Malaria Updated by Søren Thybo, Consultant and specialist in infectious diseases: What is malaria. Malaria is a serious tropical disease that in the extreme can be fatal. It is widespread across the globe in tropical and subtropical areas. Globally, malaria is a huge health problem with 300 million new cases per year. In Denmark, turning around, 100 people returned from abroad every year with the disease. Deaths among Danes have fortunately been rare some years, but in 2008, was a Danish woman infected in the Gambia and died in Denmark untreated....   [tags: Disease ] 1830 words
(5.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Malaria Vaccine Development - Malaria is a disease caused by a parasite that lives both in mosquitoes and humans; Wikipedia defines malaria as a mosquito-borne infectious disease caused by a eukaryotic protist of the genus Plasmodium. It is widespread in tropical and subtropical regions, including parts of the Americas, Asia, and Africa. However malaria to me is a nightmare, it is scary as hell, very frustrating and intimidating disease that puts you down. In my village malaria is a disease that is common during rainy season due to presence of stagnant water which is a breeding ground for mosquitoes....   [tags: Symptoms, History, Illness]
:: 6 Works Cited
1167 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Studies Pertaining to the Clinical Aspects of Malaria - STUDIES PERTAINING TO THE CLINICAL ASPECTS OF MALARIA Malaria is a complex condition exhibiting different manifestations in different parts of the world depending on a few variables (Bin Mohanna et al. 2007). It was found that anemia and splenomegaly are significantly associated with malaria among asymptomatic schoolchildren in Hajr valley, Hadramout (Bin Mohanna et al. 2007). Agina and Abd-Allah (1999) conducted a case control study for the association of nitric oxide levels to the severity and outcomes of cerebral malaria in Yemeni in-patients....   [tags: Health, Diseases] 984 words
(2.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Malaria Eradication Program - Malaria is one of the most dangerous diseases rooming this planet. The disease—carried by mosquitoes infected by a parasite—affects half the world's population (3.3 billion people) who live in sectors at risk of the transmission. In Africa, Malaria comes in 2nd as one of the leading causes of death, right after HIV and AIDS. In the United States, there are on average 1500 cases reported each year since The National Malaria Eradication program successfully eradicated malaria in the country, in the 1950's....   [tags: Disease ] 2435 words
(7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Malaria: Anopeles Mosquitoes - Malaria is an infectious disease transmitted by the female anopheles mosquitoes. It is responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year among adults and children in regions of Asia, sub-Saharan Africa, and South America. The life cycle of malaria occurs in the human body and mosquito organisms. Malaria can be classified into different variations. They are different on severity and the kinds of symptoms each type of malaria presents. The diagnostic tests used to diagnose malaria have their own advantages and disadvantages....   [tags: plasmodium, parasaites]
:: 4 Works Cited
1210 words
(3.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Roll Back Malaria - Malaria is an important public health disease endemic in over a hundred countries globally. About 90% of malaria deaths occur in Africa with a child dying every forty five seconds. Malaria accounts for 16% of child deaths in the Africa (Remme, Binka & Nabarro 2001) and 7% of deaths in children worldwide (WHO 2010). It is a disease of poverty, causing significant constraint to the economic growth of susceptible nations (WHO 2010; Sachs, Malaney 2002). Globally, numerous malaria control programmes have been initiated to eliminate and eradicate the disease....   [tags: Disease]
:: 23 Works Cited
2454 words
(7 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Malaria and DDT - Malaria and DDT Malaria has been a huge problem among many developing nations over the past century. The amount of people in the entire world that die from malaria each year is between 700,000 and 2.7 million. 75% of these deaths are African children (Med. Letter on CDC & FDA, 2001). 90% of the malaria cases in the world are located in Sub-Saharan Africa. Once again, the majority of these deaths are of children (Randerson, 2002). The numbers speak for themselves. Malaria is a huge problem and needs to be dealt with immediately....   [tags: Health Biology Essays] 924 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Linking Deforestation to Disease - Around the world exorbitant amounts of land are cleared for the purpose of human development. Land that was once forested and sloping is now flat and cleared for more humans to settle. This process of clearing forests and trees is known as deforestation. Deforestation occurs all over the globe as the increasing human population needs to expand the amount of land they use for living or farming. Our planet was once covered with trees and forests but now nearly half have disappeared with an estimated 16 million hectares that will continue to disappear each year....   [tags: Deforestation and Malaria ]
:: 8 Works Cited
1298 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Malaria : Treatment and Prevention - Malaria: Treatment and Prevention Malaria treatment is different for different patients. For severe cases, patients get blood transfusions. Others get various drugs to help get rid of the parasite. Many of these drugs are also used for prevention. Mosquito eradication and nets are also ways of preventing malaria. Unfortunately, there are many difficulties with creating malaria vaccines, so they are currently still under development. Every 30 seconds, at least one person dies of malaria. About 350-500 million people are infected with malaria each year, and about 1.3-3 million of these result in death....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical Disease]
:: 2 Works Cited
977 words
(2.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Malaria and The Problem of Global Justice by Thomas Nagel - Topic C – Malaria In “The Problem of Global Justice”, author Thomas Nagel establishes that there are various moral responsibilities nations within the international community have toward one another. He does this by claiming “the duties governing relations among peoples include not only nonaggression and fidelity to treaties, but also some developmental assistance to ‘peoples living under unfavorable conditions that prevent their having a just or decent political and social regime,’” (Nagel 124)....   [tags: public health, CDC, epidemiology]
:: 6 Works Cited
2701 words
(7.7 pages)
Research Papers [preview]
Malaria - Malaria is regarded as one of the world's deadliest tropical parasitic diseases. It claims more lives than any other communicable disease except tuberculosis. In Africa and other developing countries, it also accounts for millions of dollars in medical costs. Malaria, however, is a curable disease if promptly diagnosed and adequately treated. Malaria is a mosquito-borne disease caused by the parasite plasmodium. In recent years, most cases in the U.S. have been in people who have acquired the disease after travelling to tropical and sub-tropical areas....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 1 Works Cited
1071 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Malaria - The Disease…………… That lead everyone in for a great awaking. Malaria in humans is caused by a protozoon of the genus Plasmodium and the four subspecies, falciparum, vivax, malariae, and ovale. The species that causes the greatest illness and death in Africa is P. falciparum. The disease is transmitted by the bites of mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles, of which the Anopheles gambiae complex (the most efficient) is responsible for the transmission of disease in Africa. Fever is the main symptom of malaria....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 1 Works Cited
1679 words
(4.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Malaria - Malaria (also called biduoterian fever, blackwater fever, falciparum malaria, plasmodium, Quartan malaria, and tertian malaria) is one of the most infectious and most common diseases in the world. This serious, sometimes-fatal disease is caused by a parasite that is carried by a certain species of mosquito called the Anopheles. It claims more lives every year than any other transmissible disease except tuberculosis. Every year, five hundred million adults and children (around nine percent of the world’s population) contract the disease and of these, one hundred million people die....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 1 Works Cited
1302 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Malaria - Malaria There are a great number of diseases that are endemic in many of the poorer, developing nations due to the lack of sanitation and disease prevention programs in these areas. The steady increase of malaria epidemics in many of the African countries is a point of great concern, because this continent is home to 90% of the world’s total cases of this particular disease. Malaria gets its name from “mal aria,” meaning bad air, because patients used to blame the sudden illness on the poor air quality of the nearby swamps....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
:: 5 Works Cited
962 words
(2.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Current Status Of Malaria Vaccinology - Current Status of Malaria Vaccinology In order to assess the current status of malaria vaccinology one must first take an overview of the whole of the whole disease. One must understand the disease and its enormity on a global basis. Malaria is a protozoan disease of which over 150 million cases are reported per annum. In tropical Africa alone more than 1 million children under the age of fourteen die each year from Malaria. From these figures it is easy to see that eradication of this disease is of the utmost importance....   [tags: essays research papers] 2213 words
(6.3 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Malaria - Malaria Malaria parasites have been with us since the beginning of time, and fossils of mosquitoes up to thirty million years old show that malaria’s vector has existed for just as long. The parasites causing malaria are highly specific, with man as the only host and mosquitoes as the only vector. Every year, 300,000,000 people are affected by malaria, and while less than one percent of these people die, there are still an estimated 1,500,000 deaths per year. While Malaria was one of the first infectious diseases to be treated successfully with a drug, scientist are still looking for a cure or at least a vaccination today (Cann, 1996)....   [tags: essays research papers fc]
:: 3 Works Cited
1189 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
malaria - It is one of the ten deadliest diseases of all time. It effects men, women, children, and animals. It is in full force in Africa, India, Asia, China, South America, and the Caribbean. This disease is malaria. Nearly 40 percent of the world’s population lives in areas that are effected by the disease. Malaria is a serious, infectious disease spread by certain mosquitoes. It is caused by infection with the Plasmodium genus of the protozoan parasite. More than one hundred species of this parasite exist....   [tags: essays research papers] 688 words
(2 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Malaria - Abstract: Malaria, which has killed more people than those killed by all the war and all the plagues combined, is caused by a small protozoan parasite of the genus Plasmodium that resides within cells in the bloodstream to mature and avoid detection. There are four main species of Plasmodium that cause malaria. These species of the parasite infect humans and female anopheline mosquitoes at different stages in their life cycle. When an infected female anopheline mosquito feeds upon the blood of the vertebrate, the parasite is transferred through the saliva, into the body of the vertebrate host....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical Disease] 780 words
(2.2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Malaria and Global Responsibility - Malaria and Global Responsibility The United Nations has declared 2000-2010 the "decade to roll back malaria." The social, economic and human effects of this disease are dramatic: 40% of the world's population is currently at risk for malaria, and it kills an African child every 30 seconds(7). The presence of malaria, as that of most other endemic tropical diseases, is directly related to the precarious living conditions of people in developing countries, but is also a cause that hinders growth and development, "In Africa today, malaria is understood to be both a disease of poverty and a cause of poverty." (6)....   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 7 Works Cited
1177 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Presentation on Anti-Malaria Mosquitoes - The Malaria Protozoan parasite, of the genus Plasmodium. There are two main types of Plasmodiumthat infect humans Plasmodium Falciparum Plasmodium Vivax Transmitted by female mosquitoes Develops in mosquito gut Migrates to salivary glands Transfers to other organisms through the saliva of the mosquito. The Mosquito A mosquito is an organism of the family Culicidae. The females require a blood meal to develop eggs. The mosquito vector for malaria is the mosquito genus Anopheles. Transfers Plasmodiumthrough saliva while feeding on blood....   [tags: Powerpoint Presentation] 1024 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Understanding Malaria - Understanding Malaria For several years, I have had an interest in virology and the spread and characteristics of various infectious diseases. Though it makes sense not to possibly induce a state of panic by informing individuals of illnesses that are not native to the area they live in and that they are not likely to contract, I have always liked to remain informed out of my own curiosity and interest. Thus, I have decided to write about malaria. Malaria kills more people than any communicable disease except for tuberculosis....   [tags: Research Papers Term Papers]
:: 5 Works Cited
732 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Malaria Parasite Plasmodium and the Epidemiology of the Disease - The Malaria Parasite Plasmodium and the Epidemiology of the Disease Abstract For ages malaria has affected mankind in almost all parts of the world. It has left a deep imprint on people who have been affected with the disease, and even today in countries where epidemics are common, malaria is a constant threat to people's daily lives. Malaria is caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium (phylum Apicomplexa), and there are four species in the genus that cause the disease in humans. Their primary hosts and transmission vectors are female mosquitoes of the genus Anopheles; humans act as intermediate hosts....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical Disease]
:: 8 Works Cited
2087 words
(6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Plasmodium falciparum: The Causative Agent of Malaria - Plasmodium falciparum: The Causative Agent of Malaria Introduction The protozoan Plasmodium falciparum is responsible for causing 500 million cases of malaria per year as well as 100-200 million deaths per year worldwide (Kuby, p438). The majority of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa, especially among malnourished children. Malaria is endemic in 92 countries, where 40% of the world’s population is at risk of the disease (WHO). Documentation of malaria occurs as far back as 4000BC, with mentions of the disease on clay tablets....   [tags: Essays Papers]
:: 10 Works Cited
1031 words
(2.9 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Malaria Life Cycle - Page 1 of 6 Life Cycle of Malaria Page 2 of 6 Malaria is an ancient disease transmitted by the Anopheles mosquito that predates recorded history. Historically it was common in the swampy areas around Rome, and was believed that the tainted air in those locations made people very sick, the disease was therefore named malaria for the Latin root words bad air. Malaria is caused by small parasitic protozoa of the genus Plasmodium which infects both humans and mosquitoes in a cyclical process....   [tags: essays research papers] 1484 words
(4.2 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Malaria: What Travelers Need to Know in order to Prevent this Life Threatening Disease - The four types of the protozoa species, which is Plasmodium falciparum, Plamodium vivax, Plasmodium Ovale, causes malaria and Plasmodium malariae.Transmission occurs via the bite of the female Anopheles mosquito which is bite mainly between dusk and dawn. Types of Malaria is different between regions.For example falciparum is more common in Africa,Haiti,the Dominican Republic and Papua New Guinea.Vivax strain is usually found in India,Pakistan ,Bangladesh and Mexico and Central America.Both vivax and falcifarum are present in South America and South East Asia.Ovale and malariae are uncommon....   [tags: medical] 1972 words
(5.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Insufficient Health Care in Developing Nations - A very global issue is the insufficient health care available to pregnant women and their newborn babies in developing countries. “Greater than 500,000 women die each year as a result of complications during pregnancy and childbirth.” (Schwartz, 2013) The majority of these deaths (85%) are occurring in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia. This global issue is greatly affected by the lack of health professionals, not enough resources and preventable diseases that aren’t being controlled. It is extremely important for the public to take action because it is countries similar to Canada that have the resources to make a difference....   [tags: global issues, newborn babies, malaria]
:: 3 Works Cited
1031 words
(2.9 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
AgDscam is a Receptor found in Vectors Correlates to Malaria - Introduction The most dangerous creature in the world is the mosquito. Every year, mosquito-borne diseases, such as malaria, yellow fever, dengue fever, viral encephalitis, and West Nile virus, cripple and kill millions of people. In fact, malaria, a parasitic mosquito-borne disease, infects more than 400 million people and kills more than two million people each year. It is one of the principal causes of mortality in Africa, Southeast Asia, and Latin America. The most fatal version of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, is transmitted by the mosquito Anopheles gambiae....   [tags: Biology Mosquito] 1757 words
(5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Parasitic Malaria Prorogation Through Mosquito Host - Introduction Malaria is transmitted through a plasma-based gamete that first infects the vector through which the disease is passed, in this case the Anopheles mosquito. The gametes begin as gametocytes that are rapidly fertilized and soon transformed into zygotes, then to ookinetes (mobile forms of the zygotes) that cross the mosquito’s midgut wall as soon as nineteen and up to thirty-six hours after ingestion. These ookinetes soon convert themselves into oocysts, which are thick-walled structures that make the transfer of the zygotes to new hosts easier, and then settle in the outer lining of the midgut....   [tags: Biology] 1523 words
(4.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Symptoms and Diagnosis of Plasmodium - Symptoms and Diagnosis of Plasmodium Malaria is a disease caused by a protozoan parasite and transported by the Anopheles mosquito. Fever is the most common symptom of malaria. Other symptoms include arthralgia and vomiting. The most common diagnosis process for this disease is looking at the patient’s blood under a microscope. If microscopy is not available, antigen detection tests can be used. In a year, there can be as many as five hundred million new cases of malaria, and of those five hundred million, 2.7 million die....   [tags: Biology Medical Biomedical Malaria]
:: 2 Works Cited
715 words
(2 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Poverty in Kenya, Africa - Poverty is one of the biggest problems that the world faces in present time. The poverty that takes place in more underdeveloped countries such as Kenya, Africa, is majorly affecting the citizens because of the diseases that are being spread throughout the entire state, the lack of medical supplies that is needed for each doctor, and unsanitary water and a very insufficient amount of food. The health and well being of the citizens of Kenya, Africa is horrific, many of the diseases that are spread are very severe which can sooner or later lead to death....   [tags: hiv, aids, malaria, water borne disease]
:: 7 Works Cited
878 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Patient Exhibiting Malarial Symptoms - As there are many different conditions that present the same as malaria, a misdiagnosis is common, leaving the patient mismanaged and diseased. Some of the conditions that present the same as malaria include but are not limited to: influenza, dengue fever, Legionnaires disease, brucellosis, sinusitis and cholera. For this particular case study; influenza and dengue fever will be examined and considered as a differential diagnosis for malaria. Influenza Influenza is one of the most contagious diseases in the world, where mortality and morbidity may result (Lan et al, 2013)....   [tags: Differential Diagnoses]
:: 12 Works Cited
1775 words
(5.1 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
ABO Blood System and Malarial Infections - Malarial infections are an ongoing epidemic that millions contract globally. According to the recently published World Malaria Report by the World Health Organization (2013), during the year 2012, the number of known cases totaled 207 million with about 627,000 deaths. This number, fortunately, is decreasing over the years due to numerous interventions and education in endemic regions. The life cycle of the Plasmodium parasites has been understood for years; however, recent studies have shown that some individuals are more susceptible to infections while others are more resistant....   [tags: drug resistant, antigens, anopheles mosquito]
:: 9 Works Cited
1075 words
(3.1 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Macaria’s Daughter - Macaria’s Daughter, by Americo Paredes, is a murderous tale of male dominance and female virtue where there is a sacrifice between an altar of the Virgin of Guadalupe and the marriage bed of two distinct cultures. This story is set in south Texas and surprises the reader with the murder of a beautiful young woman named Marcela. She is found in the bedroom, lying on the floor in a pool of blood, 30 to 40 knife stabs decorate her breasts, while the local men gaze indifferently on her lifeless body....   [tags: Literature] 1636 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Malasia: Quality of Local Graduates - The number of students graduating from universities in Malaysia is increasing gradually every year. According to the Ministry of Higher Education (2011), a total number of 115 015 students and 66 767 students from the public universities and private universities graduated in the year 2010 respectively. However, the number students graduated in the year 2009 is only 113 618 students from public universities and 44 586 students from private universities in Malaysia. This shows an increase of 23 578 in the number of graduates from the year 2009 to the year 2010....   [tags: soft skills, lproblem solving skills]
:: 7 Works Cited
902 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Developing Countries Healthcare Issues and Charitable Organizations that Address Their Needs - Here in America, having the privilege to go to the doctors even when you are not ill is taken for granted. While you’ve been comfortably impatient waiting in a doctors office, have you ever taken the time to think about the millions of people around the world who die merely because they do not have the medicine, the care, and the knowledge to even help themselves prevent these easily preventable diseases and illnesses. Every sixty seconds, malaria claims life of another precious child. Maybe this is news to you or maybe this is your opportunity to let this problem resonate, while taking into account the health issues others around the world face on a daily basis....   [tags: International politics, developing countries]
:: 4 Works Cited
1203 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Global Fund - The threaded discussions have demonstrated that communicable diseases are the leading causes of illness, deaths, and disability in the African continent. In this regard, the economic costs in terms of prevention, treatment, and loss of productivity are undeniably enormous. Most, if not all of the human and financial resources allocated to Africa have focused on disease-specific intervention programs, such as prevention or treatment of malaria, tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS. Yellow fever, like malaria, is transmitted by mosquitoes and share similar symptoms....   [tags: Health, Diseases, HIV/AIDS] 833 words
(2.4 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Genetically Modified Organisms, Not Genetically Modified People - Genetic engineering is the process of transferring a gene from one living organism to another living organism. The objective is to add one or more desirable traits that the organism doesn’t originally have. An example is to transfer insect resistance traits occurring naturally in one plant to another that doesn’t have this trait. (reference 1) Example of how genetic engineering is carried out. Genetic engineering works by physically removing a gene from one organism with the desirable trait and inserting it into an other organism....   [tags: GMOs]
:: 24 Works Cited
1949 words
(5.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Koch vs. Virchow - Koch believes that most health issues arise because of biological issues, and thus can only be cured with medical advancement. On the other hand, Virchow believed that the main cause of adverse health was because of poverty and biological principles. Both men have fantastic arguments, but to see which makes more sense in our modern world, we will have to delve into some real world examples. First we will take a look at an article on malaria, which is scholarly work by Packard. Secondly we will analyze a video on Guatemala’s new approach to health care....   [tags: Health, Biology]
:: 3 Works Cited
1225 words
(3.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Sickle Cell Anemia: A Curse and a Blessing - Sickle Cell Anemia: A Curse and a Blessing Sickle Cell Anemia is a disease found right here in America, but in low levels compared to some areas of the world. The rate for this disease is around five times greater in certain places in Africa. That is because the potentially fatal disease Sickle Cell Anemia can also work as a sort of vaccination for another disease called malaria. First the mechanics of Sickle Cell Anemia will be discussed, then its possible benefits. Sickle Cell Anemia is an inherited condition....   [tags: Disease Health Sickness Essays Papers] 585 words
(1.7 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Medical Report: Food Poisoning - The patient has experienced fever, chills on body, headaches and anorexia as well as sweating especially during the night. The patient has also been feeling fatigued, muscle aches and nausea as well as vomiting especially after eating (WHO, 2010, p. 117). These symptoms started forty eight hours ago, and the patient has not taken any medication except for some aspirin. The patient has also been suffering from frequent fevers in the past two months. He has also suffered from frequent headaches but has always taken painkillers (Bloland & Williams, 2003, p....   [tags: Medical Research ]
:: 7 Works Cited
1184 words
(3.4 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Colonialism and Imperialism in Africa - Disease and Imperialism in Africa       Diseases were prevalent in Africa during the time of European Imperialism. Disease affected both natives and European peoples in Africa. African diseases affected both natives and European explorers and soldiers as well as diseases brought by the Europeans that affected the Africans.       Numerouks diseases impadcted the Europeans in Africa during the time of Imperialism.  During the time of Imperialism many explorers and soldiers died of disease. "During 1804-25 over 60 per cent of the men sent out by the Church Missionary Society died of disease" (McLynn 228)....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
1146 words
(3.3 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Effect of Infectious Diseases on Humanity - In 1859, Charles Darwin published On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection, a work of literature that not only provided a working framework for the theory of evolution, “descent with modification” by means of natural selection, but also explained how the cumulative impact of natural selection influenced an organism and its environment. Darwin, however, neglected to mention how infectious diseases have served as a pivotal selective force in natural selection (Lederberg, 1999). Since animals first walked the earth, they have had to live with microscopic organism, including bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites....   [tags: Medical Research]
:: 5 Works Cited
1882 words
(5.4 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Granuloma Formation during Parasitic Infections - Granuloma Formation during Parasitic Infections Once parasites start an infection, they can effectively resist the lethal effects of macrophages and produce chronic infection that can lead to inflammation. Parasites can induce granulomatous inflammation that serves to insulate the pathogens that resist destruction (58). These granulomas are regulated by T cells that recognize parasite-released antigens. In the tissues macrophages accumulate and secrete chemicals that induce fibrosis and stimulate the formation of granulomatous tissue and provoke fibrosis....   [tags: Biology, Parasites] 2267 words
(6.5 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
The Impact of Global Warming on Human Health - When one hears the phrase “global warming,” what often comes to mind is melting ice caps and warmer winters but most people are horribly unaware of the effects that global warming will have on human health. Food shortages, contaminated water, extreme weather, and deadly heat threaten the world because of the warming temperatures of our earth. The effects of these can be seen today and their influence will be magnified in the not-so-distant future. But the most dangerous threat we face from global warming is the spread of disease....   [tags: Climate Change Essays]
:: 8 Works Cited
1972 words
(5.6 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
The Effects of Diseases Among Tourist and the Indigenous People of the Amazon Region - Throughout history, diseases have caused devastating epidemics amongst communities. Today, infectious diseases are still spread among groups of people and have had the greatest impact in areas such as the Amazon region where interactions between tourists and the indigenous people have introduced new diseases. By examining first-hand accounts and studies, one may be able to determine the results of this danger, and formulate a key to preventing it. A potential solution may lie in the improvement of healthcare in these geographical areas such as providing a nurse practitioner and health clinics, as well as requiring travelers to receive vaccinations prior to interacting with indigenous people....   [tags: Disease ]
:: 8 Works Cited
1461 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Global Warming Debate - "Global warming is not a conqueror to kneel before - but a challenge to rise to. A challenge we must rise to." -- Joe Lieberman INTRODUCTION Global warming is a controversial environmental topic in today’s society. Global warming is when greenhouse gases (carbon dioxide, water vapor, methane, chlorofluorocarbons, perfluorocarbons, and nitrous oxide) act as a blanket that insulates the earth and prevents heat from escaping into space, which in turn causes the global temperature to rise....   [tags: Climate Change Debate, 2015] 1423 words
(4.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Sickle Cell Anemia - Sickle cell disease is a hereditary hemoglobin defect that occurs in people of African and Mediterranean decent. “First identified in 1904 by a hospital intern, sickle cell disease became, more than forty years later, the first disease found to be a genetic disease” (Harris 83). This disorder is caused by a recessive allele that changes the structure of hemoglobin. Sickle cell hemoglobin (HbS) differs from normal hemoglobin (HbA) in that of all the 574 amino acids it is made of, just one is different....   [tags: Medical Research ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1183 words
(3.4 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Single nucleotide polymorphisms and recombination rate in humans - Humans have many of the same genes but also a lot of genetic variation. Therefore, gene sequencing is different in everyone. This genetic variation determines a person's eye color, hair color, and other traits. However, this is also why some people get diseases and others don't. In a chromosome, the distance from the centromere dictates the rate of recombination. There is less shuffling in the area around the centromere, so that leads to less variation. However, understanding variation is necessary in order to determine abnormal genes....   [tags: Biology Genetic Diversity] 638 words
(1.8 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Early History of South Africa: A Climatological Case Study - Early History of South Africa: A Climatological Case Study The early history of Cape Town shares little with the experience of the rest of Africa. The patterns of colonization and the relationship between black Africans and nationalized Europeans are unique to the area. The timing and speed of settlement were possible only because of the local disease environment. The system of racial interaction, a system of Aparthide unique to the area, acted differently than other systems because of farming patterns dictated by the fertility of the land....   [tags: Climate Africa Essays Papers]
:: 4 Works Cited
985 words
(2.8 pages)
Unrated Essays [preview]
Comparing Ayurvedic and Chinese Medicine - Whether it’s pneumonia, chickenpox, or the common cold, illness is a familiar occurrence worldwide. What is not familiar, however, is how different regions of the world and different people groups approach the processes of healing and curing. “Healing may be operationally defined as the personal experience of the transcendence of suffering,” (Egnew, T.R., 2005) whereas curing is listed as the “restoration to health” in Taber’s Cyclopedic Medical Dictionary. There is a very fine line between these two terms, but two distinct philosophies, Ayurveda and Traditional Chinese, approach the healing and curing of disease in very unique ways....   [tags: Healing, Curing, Herbal Remedies]
:: 11 Works Cited
1970 words
(5.6 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Bioremediation of DDT - Over 39 years have passed since the nationwide ban of a well-known pesticide, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) (1), yet it still has an important role in public health as well as the environment. DDT is a persistent toxin, having a long half-life of 2 to 15 years terrestrially and 150 years aquatically (as cited in 5). It was originally used in World War II to control malaria and yellow fever then became a main staple in pesticide control for crops. Because DDT was a highly effective pesticide for malaria it is still used in areas where the disease is prevalent....   [tags: Use, Impact, Importance]
:: 9 Works Cited
632 words
(1.8 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Affect of Low Literacy Rates on Standard of Living in Africa - The rich prosper and the poor struggle to survive. Citizens in developed nations, such as Canada, do not usually think about developing African nations and their problems. Those fortunate enough to have a steady income cannot imagine how other developing countries or other people have so little when they possess so much. Thus, the question arises, what challenges are developing African countries experiencing as they struggle to improve their standards of living. In order, to answer this question, it is essential to consider the adult literacy rates, the population infected with diseases, and the debts of developing countries....   [tags: Literacy] 924 words
(2.6 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
The Impact of Climate Change on Africa - Scientists, economists, and policy makers all agree the world is facing threat from climate warming. Climate warming is caused by excess greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide which are heat trapping gasses. Human use of fossil fuels is a significant source of these gasses. When we drive our cars, heat our homes with oil or natural gas, or use electricity from coal fired power plants, we contribute to global warming. Including any loss of trees or forests also contributes, considering trees convert carbon dioxide to oxygen....   [tags: Global Warming Essays]
:: 10 Works Cited
1473 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Poverty and Health in Somalia and Africa - Africa has many issues going on, but the one issue in specific that I am going to talk about is the poverty and health of Somalia, and the whole of Africa. Somalia is the poorest country in the world and they have a very weak health system. Africa is also not doing very well economically. Africa is the poorest Continent in the world. Every single one of the top ten poorest countries is in Africa. First, off I am going to talk about the health system. Here are some quick facts about the health of the people in Africa....   [tags: africa, health issues]
:: 6 Works Cited
1402 words
(4 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Living Conditions During the Elizabethan Era - Through the process of rebuilding and establishing a more modern nation, Europeans gained cleaner living conditions and thus, a more sustainable life. Sanitation and cleanliness eliminates difficulties from the body, mind, and environment; however, hygiene was non-existent during the Elizabethan Era. This led to the manifestation of diseases and illnesses. Treatments were unreliable and solely based on superstitions, so there was a dramatic decrease in population. As Europe gained more insight on anatomy, treatments improved and fewer diseases circulated the nation....   [tags: sanitation, cleanliness, diseases, tame river]
:: 12 Works Cited
1476 words
(4.2 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
The Plasmodium Paradox - Malaria rather paradoxically seems to invest few resources in gametocyte (the reproductive and transmissible stage) production. Mathematical modeling is used to explore how this reproductive restraint can be evolutionarily adaptive. Where in-host strain competition appears to be the key driving force. Malaria cases a vast amount of mortality and morbidity, claiming in the order of one million lives every year mostly in sub-Saharan Africa. As such it is perhaps one of the most deadly of infectious diseases plaguing populations today....   [tags: Research Analysis ]
:: 4 Works Cited
1677 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Global Public Health - After 150 years of public health research and intervention, there are bound to be many lessons to draw upon which can provide the insight to guide public health professionals and institutions as they design and implement specific strategies, policies, and measures to increase global resilience for “complex health emergencies”. Identifying both the modifications to public health systems and looking closely from the history of managing environmental and other threats to the public health sector increases the world’s adaptive capacity to more effectively cope and manage with public health emergencies....   [tags: Public Health Care Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1667 words
(4.8 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Millennium Development Goals and Jamaica - The Millennium Development Goals (MDG) represents the basic necessities and rights that any human would want to enjoy. It is a nationwide commitment made in September 2000 at a United Nations Millennium Summit meeting by 189 countries including Jamaica (Sweetman, 2005, p.2). Its emergence came as a major objective in an effort toward global development within a fifteen (15) year period. These objectives are targeted at the poorest sets of people in the world and are geared towards eliminating severe poverty and improving the provisions of good health and well-being....   [tags: International Development]
:: 6 Works Cited
1312 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Clinical Genetic Disorder: Beta Thalassemia - John and his wife Mary decided that after 3 years of marriage it was time for them to bring a child into their life. John and Mary lived on the coast of Italy, where the weather was always sunny and warm and the water not but a stone toss away. John and Mary decided that it was the right time, then, 9 months later they conceived a son, they named him Henry. During the first two years of Henry’s life John and Mary noticed abnormalities in Henry’s development. Henry did not gain weight or grow as he was expected to....   [tags: Genetic Blood Disorder]
:: 7 Works Cited
1352 words
(3.9 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Ethiopia's Medical Dilemma - Ethiopia's Medical Dilemma Living in an industrialized country like America, and especially in a community such as Bryn Mawr, we are well fed and given excellent healthcare. Despite student complaints that they cannot go to the health center for a cough drop without being asked if they could be pregnant, most students are aware that they are very lucky and appreciate that there are parts of the world that are ravaged by diseases such as Malaria, which kills three children every minute. We donate money, we participate in clothing drives, but it is there that our involvement often ends, and we rarely see how effectively organizations such as Doctors without Border or Unicef ameliorate epidem...   [tags: Biology Essays Research Papers]
:: 5 Works Cited
1002 words
(2.9 pages)
FREE Essays [view]
Companies Should Research Health Care Products For Use in Developing Nations - Companies Should Research Health Care Products For Use in Developing Nations The industry of medical research and product development is an expensive and risky business in which the rate of failure far outweighs the likelihood of success (Glaxo). Only the largest companies can afford to invest large amounts of time and capital in projects that seem to have little chance of striking research gold--a drug that is effective, safe, and marketable for a profit. This creates an obvious problem: what incentives exist that would encourage companies to make a commitment to the development and distribution of products that are not likely to produce great returns, namely medicines that would be used...   [tags: Argumentative Persuasive Essays]
:: 4 Works Cited
1936 words
(5.5 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Antimicrobial Resistance, Resistant Nosocomial Pathogens and Molecular Diagnosis of Emerging Infectious Diseases - Microorganisms form part of our normal flora, however they can become pathogens where their main role is to survive and multiply, often at the expense of the host. Pathogens cause infectious diseases depending on their virulence; this was first realised when Louis Pasteur discovered microbes contaminated wine, causing it to go sour. He wondered how microbes affected humans; however it was Robert Koch that linked the contamination of microbes to the cause of infectious diseases. Between them they discovered and identified many of the microbes that caused diseases....   [tags: biology, microorganisms, pathogens]
:: 17 Works Cited
1628 words
(4.7 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Sustainable Development: Food, Natural Resources, and Gender - FE4412 – Sustainable Development: Food, Natural Resources & Gender Sustainable Development: General Overview As defined by the United Nations World Commission on Environment and Development in 1987, development is sustainable if it “meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs.” This Report brought the need for sustainable development to the attention of the over twenty years ago and as I will explain it is becoming more relevant to us as the human race starts to realise that we are living on a finite planet which will run out of the resources to support us eventually....   [tags: survival, sustainability, environment, economy]
:: 5 Works Cited
2247 words
(6.4 pages)
Term Papers [preview]
Preventing Infectious Diseases Due to Climate Changes - The essential method for preventing climate change from affecting human health is to stop climate change altogether. While some degree of climate change has already occurred, the idea is to reduce greenhouse gas emissions to the extend where this phe¬nomenon is considerably slowed. The in¬tergovernmental panel on climate change has determined that a 50% reduction in greenhouse gas emissions (compared with 1990 levels) by 2050 will be necessary to stabilize the global temperature increase at 2–2.4 °c compared with preindustrial times....   [tags: Global Warming Essays]
:: 1 Works Cited
888 words
(2.5 pages)
Better Essays [preview]
Information is the Acknowledgement of Facts - Information is the acknowledgement of facts and physical happenings that can be seen, observed and analyzed. While knowledge, on the other hand, is linked to the critical assessment of one’s perceptions and comprehension of the inferences being drawn from the observed facts. Knowledge also encompasses the ability to feel that is hidden and implicated in this universe as well as in the behavior and dealings of our fellow human beings. Information and knowledge often go hand in hand but the status of information is often misunderstood and elevated to that of knowledge which occupies a higher place in the column; since, it plays a definite role in the development of a person’s personality by e...   [tags: science, world hunger, ignorance]
:: 8 Works Cited
1284 words
(3.7 pages)
Strong Essays [preview]
Global Cities: Rapid Growth and Economy - Global cities are strategic spatial nodes of the world economy with localized basing points for capital accumulation in an age of intensified globalization (Brenner, 1998). (Sassen, 2005), argues that centralization has taken a new form. The major contributor to this new form is reorganization of the financial industry and spatial dispersion of economic activities. This has led to an overall concentration in control and ownership. Dispersion of the economic activities has led to specialization of firms as well as expansion in central functions....   [tags: Development, Expansion, Centralization]
:: 9 Works Cited
1796 words
(5.1 pages)
Powerful Essays [preview]
Migration and Disease in Africa during European Imperialism - The Relationship between Migration and Disease in Africa during European Imperialism During the era of European Imperialism, from approximately 1880 to 1930, an increasing number of Europeans began to colonize West Africa. Because of this colonization many African natives migrated eastward, inadvertently transporting diseases to which the East Africans were not immune (Ransford 76). This phenomenon can be explained through examining the implications of geographical isolation, the effects of large-scale migration, and alluding to a specific example of disease transference in Africa from the west to the east....   [tags: European History]
:: 4 Works Cited
736 words
(2.1 pages)
Better Essays [preview]


Your search returned over 400 essays for "malaria"
1  2  3  4  5    Next >>