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Your search returned over 400 essays for "kinship"
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Kinship and Family go Hand-in-hand - ... Factors such as economics, ethnics, generations, and gender may cause some cultures to claim some as relatives but not others. Throughout the course of this essay I will attempt to address who I classify as kin, my family. During the process of creating my family tree I began by asking myself the questions, “who am I closest with?” and “who has influence me most as a person?” The answers to these questions consisted of lines of bilateral decent; just as the Euro-American system of lineage tends to do these days....   [tags: definition: kinship, factors] 743 words
(2.1 pages)
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Chinese Kinship Systems - Chinese Kinship Systems Works Cited Missing It would be impossible to disagree with the statement that “Chinese kinship is based on male predominance”. In fact this statement may even be under-emphasizing the control and absolute power that males wield across all levels of Chinese society. Of course, where their power initially comes from though, is through the family or termed differently the “jia”. It is this extended or ideal family that cultivates the consistent patrilineal form of control/descent and dictates that residence in said “jia” is primarily patrilocal....   [tags: China Chinese Kin Kinship Essays] 3261 words
(9.3 pages)
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The Downfall of Kinship - The Downfall of Kinship(Question 2) In the past, kinship has been an integral part of explaining societies in the anthropological field, as it is one of the bases of social structure in most societies to varying degrees. However, with the eventual spread of what is modernly western ideals, the importance of kinship was lost and thought to be outdated for western philosophy. So, with the western ideals and the newer action of globalization, making these western ideals the norm, kinship is seen as less important for societal structure, though moderately important from a biological perspective....   [tags: Anthropology ]
:: 6 Works Cited
1682 words
(4.8 pages)
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The Ambiguity of Kinship - The planet that we live on is no longer the same as it was several hundred years ago, nor are its inhabitants. An ongoing depletion of our world’s flora and fauna and biological simplicity has left us with a sharp increase in globalization and a convoluted network of people. There is no certainty about what lies ahead but we can question and seek to understand the state in which we are living. One particular by-product of this worldly complexity is that of kinship—family relationships through blood, marriage, or adoption....   [tags: Social Studies] 1470 words
(4.2 pages)
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Kinship and Marriage - ... As time passes by, and more new ideas and beliefs emerge the more modern peoples thinking become, and i think that is a big reason why the strict traditions are somewhat softening and opening up to new ideas. In the Yanomamo society marriages are arranged by the father of the people who are to be married, and this is very similar to arranged marriages in Indian societies, because the father, or the man of the house, has a very strong say in the final decision. The father in both societies has an huge role in making the final decision, because the father bases the marriage on alliances that would be good for his family....   [tags: Yano and Dobe societies] 2175 words
(6.2 pages)
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Kinship - Kinship is used to describe the relationship that exists between or among entities or individuals that share a common origin in terms of culture, historical ancestry or biological relationship. Kinship refers to the relationships defined by a particular culture among or between individuals who have a common family ties. Kinship is used as a basis to classify people and to form social groups in the different societies. The patterns and rules that govern kinship differ in the various communities all around the world....   [tags: Social Issues]
:: 6 Works Cited
1221 words
(3.5 pages)
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Kinship and Marriage in Gurung Society - ... A household will begin as a nuclear family, with the parents and their children living under the same roof. But as sons reach adulthood and marry, their brides come into the parental home and they will raise their first few children in the house before “creating their own households,” normally close to the parent’s home (McHugh 86). Daughters will leave the home and move to their husbands’ home village and when parents die, their children usually inherit their home – either a son or a married daughter may inherit land and property from their parents - and the cycle of nuclear family living will start again....   [tags: clan, family, human, connection, lineage]
:: 1 Works Cited
591 words
(1.7 pages)
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Impact of Kinship Arrangements on Children - With the number of traditional families in decline, many people have questions regarding the sanctity of marriage, as well as how we define the family unit as a whole. The purpose of this report is to offer facts and opinions about working parents and their children, strength of marriage and the effects of kinship arrangements on children of modern society. When parents regulate their lives in any way, including work schedules and other career options, it is reasonable to believe that the welfare of their child could be an important part of this choice; however, such preferences are not necessarily selected “to save the traditional family” (Macionis, 2010, ¶ 8), as is suggested within parts...   [tags: Family Sociology]
:: 1 Works Cited
713 words
(2 pages)
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Education for Kinship Children - This essay will examine how principles for working with children in kinship care and their carers influence professionals practice towards improving their educational outcomes. Legislations will be explored with an insight in to the history and development of raising educational attainment of kinship children. The Every Child Matters (2003) policy applies to everyone who works with or provides services to children to promote the five outcomes to ensure that children get the best start in life. However children who experience a non-typical childhood between 0 - 8yrs appear to be forgotten and evidence of this concept will be explored....   [tags: Education ]
:: 31 Works Cited
2282 words
(6.5 pages)
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The Study of Kinship - The Study of Kinship *Works Cited Missing* When studying kinship, it is needless to say that just one type of society can justify for kinship patterns; rather, to be able to identify and understand the differences of kinship systems, one needs to do a cross-cultural comparison. I’ve decided to compare the system of the Trobriand Islanders of the South Pacific, to the very loose kinship arrangement of the Ju’wasi San of the Kalahari....   [tags: Papers] 1217 words
(3.5 pages)
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What Kinship Means to Different People - ... As we began creating her kinship chart, she told me that her mom’s family all resides within five miles of where she currently lives, so they often see one another for birthday events or planned family get-togethers. Her father’s side resides in the Midwest and Samantha has only visited them a couple of times in her life. Regardless of the fact that she has more contact with her mother’s side, she considers herself extremely close to both sides, emphasizing the importance of biology over distance and the amount of contact....   [tags: samantha rose, biological ties] 916 words
(2.6 pages)
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Kinship Care of Children with Incarcerated Parents - In 2007 there were approximately 77,200 fathers and 65,600 mothers incarcerated in the United States (Bureau of Justice Statistics, 2007). As our society continues to grow, our jail and prison population are growing as well. When a parent or guardian is taken into custody the juvenile (child) is taken and released to a relative or child protective services. The children are either given to a close family member or a surrogate parent, meaning a foster home. This may have an emotional impact on the juvenile involved, which may lead them to committing delinquent acts....   [tags: Foster Care, Relationships, Visits] 1495 words
(4.3 pages)
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Kinship and Social Bonds in Female Chimpanzees - ... This was done by observations at two different time periods. The first period was from October 2003 to September 2004 and the second time period took place October 2007 until March 2008. The study only analyzes chimpanzees from the Ngogo community. Some sources which could have made the sample atypical would be if the chimpanzee was not social, not a chimpanzee or from a different area. The study used a Pairwise affinity index, the Doncaster Index, as well as matrix permutation tests as tools to help determine different aspects of observations made on male and female chimpanzees....   [tags: social, mammals, research, study, observation]
:: 1 Works Cited
847 words
(2.4 pages)
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Kinship As A Mechanism For Social Integrating - Kinship as a Mechanism for Social Integrating It is often demonstrated in many anthropological studies that kinship acts as an important means for social integrating in a given society. But is it a fair generalization to say that kinship always functions as a mechanism for social integration. Kinship refers to the relationships established through marriage or descent groups that has been proven in some societies to lead to social integrating, or the process of interaction with other individuals....   [tags: essays research papers] 1038 words
(3 pages)
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The Significance of Family and Kinship - The Significance of Family and Kinship One of the most important and essential things that everyone must have in order to live a great and joyful life is family. One must follow values to be successful in life, and one must also support their family to keep that success advancing toward the future. In David W. McCurdy’s article, “Family and Kinship in Village India,” it discusses the significance of how a successful family is formed by tradition, preparation, and patience. The article describes how kinship has the power to arrange marriages successfully, make families unite and assist each other, and teach and help one another agriculturally or economically....   [tags: essays papers] 673 words
(1.9 pages)
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Texas Kinship Care: iOverview and Analysis of Effectiveness - Description of the Problem The Texas the Kinship Care program is codified in the Texas Family Code Section 262.201(f). The enactment of such a policy that calls for placement of children within their family unit became important to maintain familial ties, as well as, providing stability and security to children with the least amount of disruption in their lives when they must be removed from their parents care. Kinship Care programs are economically advantageous to local, state and federal government as it is not considered formal foster care....   [tags: Family Unit, Orphans]
:: 4 Works Cited
1902 words
(5.4 pages)
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How Does Life in Exile Influence Kinship? - This essay will look at different views on how living in exile can affect kinship. Living in exile refers to individuals who live away from their native country. A person may life in exile through force or self decision. Kinship is a little harder to explain. A general definition of kinship refers to individuals who are 'genealogically related to each other' (Holy, 1996:40), for example, family. Genealogical relations can be through marriage or descent. Holy (1996) also describes descent as a relationship through a genealogical tie to any ancestor....   [tags: sociological analysis] 1870 words
(5.3 pages)
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Spelling and Differently: Kinship, Deception and Challenges - Alice Munro's Spelling and Differently:   Kinship, Deception and Challenges              The two short stories Spelling and Differently, written by Alice Munro, deal with female relationships.  These relationships paint a vivid picture of the kinship, deception, challenges, and associations that affect friends and family as they journey through life. "Spelling" is about the relationship of two women, Rose and Flo. Although from the outset the relationship between Rose and Flo is not clear, near the end the reader has no doubt they are mother and daughter.  Munro illustrates the awkward relationship between a parent and a child and the difficult problems that face children as their parent...   [tags: Alice Munro Spelling Differently]
:: 4 Works Cited
1444 words
(4.1 pages)
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Kinship Care: Help for 'Looked After Children' in the Education System - This essay will explore how principles for working with children in kinship care and their carers influence professionals practice towards improving their educational outcomes. Legislations will be explored with an insight to the history and development of raising educational attainment of kinship children. The term Kin child/children is a child being raised by a member of their family because they can no longer live with their parents (Family and Friends Carers, 2011).Kinship care is defined in many ways such as private and informal, registered private and Local Authority foster care....   [tags: Education, primary education] 2156 words
(6.2 pages)
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Essay on Kinship in A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man - Search for Kinship in Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man       At the heart of James Joyce’s A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man lies Stephen Dedalus, a sensitive young man concerned with discovering his purpose in life. Convinced that his lack of kinship or community with others is a shortcoming that he must correct, Stephen, who is modeled after Joyce, endeavors to fully realize himself by attempting to create a forced kinship with others. He tries many methods in hopes of achieving this sense of belonging, including the visiting of prostitutes and nearly joining the clergy....   [tags: Portrait Artist Young Man]
:: 1 Works Cited
1528 words
(4.4 pages)
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Feminism and How the Roles of Women Have Changed Ever So Slightly - Kinship or the Family is a major social institution if not one of the primary structural forces, which shape subject formation and societal views. Kinship relations play a significant role in the constitution of societal roles, cultural values and identity. In Western culture, Kinship places a strong emphasis on marriage and reproduction and, moreover, makes assumptions about sex, gender, and sexuality classifications and reinforces gender roles. For example, In their Anthropological piece titled, Is There a Family?, Jane Collier, Michelle Z....   [tags: Kinship or family, sociological analysis] 848 words
(2.4 pages)
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Traditional Family Beliefs in Ancient and Modern China - Historically, the Chinese have considered the family as the basic unit of society. Familial principles such as obedience, loyalty, and kinship have been cherished in all states. In premodern China, many philosophers discussed their own beliefs about family. Confucius and other philosophers defined that an exemplary family was the one in which parents cared about their children, and children obeyed their parents. The Analects of Confucius discusses filiality, a traditional obedience to parents and ancestors, as its central theme....   [tags: Traditions, Politics, Kinship] 619 words
(1.8 pages)
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Grendel's Mother: Monster or Not? - In the poem “Beowulf,” Grendel’s mother, a monstrous creature, is one of the three antagonists Beowulf, the main character, fights against. The battle against Grendel’s mother appears to be the strangest of the three battles. The main reason for its strangeness is that Grendel’s mother is the mother of the monster Grendel, who was killed by Beowulf in the first battle. Another reason for its strangeness is that Grendel’s mother is the only female-type creature. An alternative reason for this strangeness in the battle is due to the fact that Grendel’s mother is not a true monster, aside from her physical form....   [tags: strange, kinship, kill, mother] 1579 words
(4.5 pages)
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Overview of Purple Hibiscus by Chimamanda Adichie - Throughout the centuries, the roles of Nigerian women have continuously evolved. During the pre- colonial era, women in Nigerian tribes were not only child bearers and wives, but also free adults. They played critical roles in food preparation, weaving, pottery, and the economy. However, the impact of British rule in Nigeria made a significant shift from the pre-colonial to the post- colonial era. The influence of the Catholic Church, Western style education, patriarchal government and modern ways of making money took a major toll in a woman’s role in society....   [tags: nigerian women, kinship, tribes]
:: 3 Works Cited
1318 words
(3.8 pages)
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Slavery: Negated Familial Ties - Even though slavery is a state of bondage, it has to do with relations between people. Most scholarly discourses that exist surrounding slavery recognize that bondage leads to a loss of identity as it curtails the ties of the slaves to their heritage. Sociologist Orlando Patterson’s definition of Slavery is applicable here, as he delineates slavery as "…a permanent, violent domination of natally alienated and generally dishonored persons." Thus, Slavery banned slaves from all formal, legally enforceable ties of “blood,” and from any attachment to groups or localities other than those chosen for them by the master....   [tags: Fictive Kinship, Paterbal Bond]
:: 4 Works Cited
1634 words
(4.7 pages)
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How Do Awlad 'Ali Bedouin Ideas about Blood Provide the Idiom for Different Kinds of Social Relations? - Kinship is understood as the relationships in a society through blood and marriage. It is considered a fundamental cultural basis. From kinship systems social norms develop in the communities, including rights and responsibilities, greatly impacting behavior. These systems are described as kinship terms, relationships and groups in a society. Kinship ultimately has two core functions through kinship systems that are crucial for the preservation of culture and societies. First, these ties provide continuation of generations and family formation....   [tags: kinship systems, Western desert societies] 1000 words
(2.9 pages)
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Primordial and Modernist Schooling - ... It is more generally to see are the tribes identifying themselves from each other by this kinship, not only remained in a small family membership but also much more extensive and broad level. Therefore, identity can be shaped and constructed through a fixed or pre-existed biological and genetic connection. And this is one of the primary ideas of primordial school for identity study. The primordial school is also emphasizing the importance of the culture roots as one of the impacts on identity....   [tags: study, identity, nation, kinship, language] 1303 words
(3.7 pages)
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What Should do with Children that are Taken out of their Homes by Child Protection Agencies - Should children who are taken out of their homes by Child Protection Agencies, be placed in foster care or should more effort be made for them to be placed with family (Kinship). This is a very important question because in the society where we are always wondering what is in the best interests of the child, this question is the primary question of best interest. It is my opinion that children should be placed with family first and foremost prior to being placed with strangers’ believe CPS agencies should place more resources and effort to placing children in homes with people they know vs....   [tags: foster care, kinship care, child protection]
:: 4 Works Cited
1533 words
(4.4 pages)
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Looked After Child and the Current System on LAC in the UK - In this essay, the researcher will explore what a ‘looked after child’ is and the current system for LAC in the UK. This includes legislation, Policy and, statistics on LAC in the UK. As well as, this essay will include why children looked after by the local authority, why do they end up with the local authority, the impact of child abuse and neglect on children, young people and their families, and lastly other issues/perceptions surrounded around children and young people who are ‘looked after’....   [tags: kinship care, child abuse, foster care]
:: 15 Works Cited
1510 words
(4.3 pages)
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Family in Samuel Richardson's Clarissa - Family in Samuel Richardson's Clarissa Family plays an extremely important role in Samuel Richardson’s Clarissa. Biological families drive the action and the plot of Clarissa. Clarissa’s family tries to force her into marriage with Solmes and therefore drives her into the waiting arms of Lovelace. Throughout Clarissa, biological families fail. James Harlowe Senior, weak from the gout, passes his paternal authority on to his son, creating a fictional version of kinship. Lovelace’s family does not control him....   [tags: Kinship Samuel Richardson Clarissa Essays] 1864 words
(5.3 pages)
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The Debate on How Urban Middle-Class Identities Have Changed - The Debate on How Urban Middle-Class Identities Have Changed “Materialism is the new karma”. (Pavan K Varma, 2005) Whilst numerical estimates of the Indian middle classes vary drastically, media images contribute to their portrayal as affluent consumers- participants in the IT boom in urban centres such as Hyderabad and those revelling in India’s status as a call centre “superpower”, particularly thought to symbolise a new urban middle-class. Varma’s quote encapsulates the astonishing effect mass culture is thought to have had upon Indian identity, especially those who occupy this middle ground of consumption....   [tags: Social Classes India Kinship Essays]
:: 16 Works Cited
3940 words
(11.3 pages)
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Human Nature - As humans there are both similarities and differences among the different people and cultures in the world. Several aspects of human experience that are common to all people are kinship, security, and have their own highly regarded ideas and dreams. These are universal because common human nature is rooted in all humans that have been observed by anthropologists throughout the centuries. Several major kinds of differences between people are the argument between modernization and traditionalism; the division of power between classes, government, and the people; and bonds within the family unit; the perception of a woman’s role....   [tags: kinship, security, hope, ties that bind]
:: 13 Works Cited
2517 words
(7.2 pages)
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South Africa: Land Acquisition and Involuntary Resettlement - New Settlement Each household has identified a host site to which they would like to be moved, the seven households were relocated to seven different villages of their choice. The villages (Magake, Mongatana and Mogobadi) are ruled and administered by the Kings ‘Kgoshi’ (KgoshiPhasa and KgoshiMampa) respectively. (Synergy, 2013) Most of the rural land in South Africa is still administered by a trust held by the Department of Rural Development and Land Reform for the people. Makobakoba’s village is under a trust which is governed by Kgoshi Mashabela....   [tags: vulnerable people, social fabric, kingship]
:: 25 Works Cited
1283 words
(3.7 pages)
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Ancient Kingship and Rulers - Kings and rulers started to emerge as soon as people moved away from living in tribes. This was the case with the Jews when they have decided to unite under one ruler. However, long before them the first empire was established in Mesopotamia by Sargon of Akkad in 2334 BCE (Kelly, 2011). The essay will compare kingship in three geographically and chronologically different societies. They are the following: Babylonians during Hammurabi’s reign (1792-1750 BCE), Neo-Assyrians (934-610 BCE), and the Jews (1000 BCE)....   [tags: Social Studies]
:: 3 Works Cited
1481 words
(4.2 pages)
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The Pro-Kingship and Anti-Kingship Debate - The Pro-Kingship and Anti-Kingship Debate The pro-kingship and anti-kingship debate as discussed in 1 Samuel is about the request to Samuel from his people for a king. They feel a king is needed because Samuel's sons don't follow his example and are bad leaders. Samuel follows through with their request by asking God for a king. Samuel was hesitant to do so, but asked God anyway and He followed through with their request. In my opinion, the pro-kingship argument brings up some good points. A king can be a good thing to have especially in times of turmoil....   [tags: The Bible] 268 words
(0.8 pages)
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Shakespeare And Kingship - Shakespeare And Kingship In writing his history plays, Shakespeare was actually commenting on what he thought about the notion of kingship. Through his plays, he questions the divine right of kings, which the kings and the aristocracy used heavily in their favour to win the people's love. In Macbeth, King Richard II and King Henry IV part 1, Shakespeare shows us his opinion of kingship in general. Although the plays are written about individual kings, I think that Shakespeare used the plays as an opportunity to voice his opinion on kings and kingship in general....   [tags: William Shakespeare Kings Essays] 1590 words
(4.5 pages)
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Macbeth - Kingship - With detailed reference to the characters of Macbeth, Duncan, Malcolm and Edward in the play ‘Macbeth’, analyse William Shakespeare’s ideas and attributes towards kingship and assess what you think the audiences reaction to the play would be at the time. Shakespeare’s ideas towards kingship can be seen throughout the play. He shows that a king should be chosen by divine right and shows the attributes of what a good king should be. The play ‘Macbeth’ is set in medieval Scotland at the fictional time of King Duncan....   [tags: essays research papers] 1611 words
(4.6 pages)
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How Would You Define the Mesopotamian Ideal of Kingship? - ... On arrival, notable would pay homage to the new king and present him with gifts and their insignia of office. The coronation ceremony officially ended when the king spoke the words "Everyone resumes his office.” the Laws of Hammurabi, kings had numerous functions and duties to carry out. These included administering and obeying the law, and maintaining security and order for his subjects. During times of war and conflict, a king was expected to act as his country's military leader. In addition, a king was expected to be a role model to his people....   [tags: afterlife, egypt, death] 932 words
(2.7 pages)
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Henry V's Treatment of Kingship - William Shakespeare's historical play, The Life of Henry V, captures the essence of noble kingship during the Elizabethan era through the intelligent young King Henry who utilizes his uncanny rhetorical skill to manipulate friends and foes alike, and by combining both a ruthless sense of determination and a compassionate nature to successfully portray a good king as well as a good man. He focuses primarily on the responsibilities of kingship, putting his feelings second to the crown in order to gain the support of his people and a degree of fear among his enemies....   [tags: European Literature] 717 words
(2 pages)
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Beowulf: A Study of Kingship - For the most part, Beowulf’s characteristics describe those of a triumphant warrior who played a major role in defending the lives of his fellow citizens, while leading a thriving country. Although Beowulf soon became king, he died for his people, and was remembered as a victorious fighter. Beowulf is at least in part a study of kingship because it discusses the qualities that produce a good king, the disadvantages during his rule and how he overcame them, and the problems that arose upon his death....   [tags: Epic of Beowulf] 423 words
(1.2 pages)
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Kingship in Shakesperean Plays - Kingship in Shakesperean Plays Due to the powerful influence of the monarchy, the nature, duties and responsibilities of kingship were of particular interest to Shakespeare. The mark of a bad king was the decline of the political, social and economic climates, while the mark of a good king was the blossoming of such worlds. Therefore, the characteristics of the person occupying the kingship were crucial to the health of the nation. Shakespeare explores this issue in many of his plays by examining the traits of poorly fulfilled kingships, and the political and social ramifications of such monarchical failures....   [tags: Kings Royalty Shakespeare Essays] 2514 words
(7.2 pages)
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Shakespeare, Kingship, and the Chain of Being in Macbeth - Shakespeare, Kingship, and the Chain of Being in Macbeth Shakespeare's play "Macbeth" is largely based upon the theme of kingship. "Macbeth" was written for James the 1st, who would have been interested in kingship and believed in the "chain of being" and the "divine right" of kings. The "chain of being" is the belief that everything is connected like a chain, and is affected by anything above it. God was believed to be at the top of the chain, and the King was believed to be the highest on earth....   [tags: The Tragedy of Macbeth] 817 words
(2.3 pages)
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Plebians and The Patricians - ... They could participate in the “democratic process” by voting in the comitia centuriata. However, they were not allowed to hold any of the new offices neither could they sit in the senate, Morey, (n.d.). When they drove the kings out, Rome became a republic but one which was more of aristocratic than democratic, Morey, (n.d.). This means that the political power among others was concentrated in the hands of a particular class (few) instead of the whole people, Morey, (n.d.). This brewed discontent, political discomfort, and discord among the plebeians....   [tags: despotic roman kingship, monarchy] 533 words
(1.5 pages)
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Kingship in King Lear and King Henry IV, Part I - Though the concept of kingship is rather unfamiliar and even alien to the contemporary democratic society, it was and still is a topic of great importance to English society. And during the Elizabethan era, no collection of renowned works helped to emphasize this notion more than Shakespeare’s plays – plays such as Macbeth, Hamlet, the Tudor history plays, and even King Lear. There are some who have argued that Shakespeare orchestrated these plays as a means of teaching his audience about political power; the responsibilities of a just ruler; the duties of the subject; and the qualities of a true king....   [tags: power, ruler, William Shakespeare]
:: 3 Works Cited
1380 words
(3.9 pages)
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Expectations of Kingship in Henry IV by William Shakespeare - Expectations of Kingship in Henry IV by William Shakespeare Henry IV is a play that concerns itself with political power and kingship in English history. References to kingship are prevalent throughout the play, especially in the depiction of the characters. Although most of the characters in this play could teach us about kingship, I would like to focus my attention to Prince Henry. I think that this character helps us to best understand what kingship meant at this particular time in history....   [tags: Papers] 847 words
(2.4 pages)
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Kingship and Leadership in William Shakespeare's King Lear - Kingship and Leadership in William Shakespeare's King Lear Jonathon Dollimore (1984) focuses on Lear’s identity throughout the play. ‘What makes Lear the person he is, is not kingly essence, but among other things, his authority and his family. As the play progresses Lear is forced to question his identity. “Does anyone hear know me?…Who is it that can tell me who I am?”. Dollimore believes King Lear is about power, poverty and inheritance. Shakespeare focuses on what happens when there is a ‘catastrophic redistribution of power’....   [tags: Papers] 1460 words
(4.2 pages)
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Exploration of Shakespeare's Views on Kingship Through Macbeth - Exploration of Shakespeare's Views on Kingship Through Macbeth Works Cited Not Included Macbeth was written by William Shakespeare in around 1606 and is Shakespeare's shortest tragedy. He wrote Macbeth whilst James I was on the throne. James believed strongly in divine right. This may have helped Shakespeare's views on kingship. In Macbeth there are four kings: Edward of England; Duncan; Malcolm and Macbeth....   [tags: Papers] 947 words
(2.7 pages)
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The Source of a Prince's Happiness and Misery in Augustine’s City of God and Aquinas’s On Kingship and Machiaveli's The Prince - ... Founders like Romulus, Theseus and Cyrus relied on their own abilities and virtues and were able to achieve happiness for themselves and their fatherland. Machiavelli strays away from Augustine’s advice for a prince to be humble. A prince must be admired and praised by his subjects to sustain the happiness a prince has gained through their actions and virtue. Chapter 19 describes how a great ruler, Septimius Severus, “was always able to rule happily because his virtues made him so admirable in the sight of the soldiers and the people”....   [tags: god, lust, love] 1467 words
(4.2 pages)
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An Analysis of the Epic Poem, Beowulf - Fame, Kingship, Fate and God in Beowulf - Fame, Kingship, Fate and God in Beowulf The Anglo-Saxons were a people who lived in and ruled England from the fifth century AD until the Norman Conquest. They were a people who valued courage and leadership. They lived under kings who were "keepers of gold" and were guarded by their loyal thanes (knights). They were a Pagan culture until the Normandy conquistadors came. They believed in fate and believed the only way to live forever was if you had fame. In the Anglo-Saxon book, Beowulf, there was a combination of many different people....   [tags: Epic Beowulf essays] 1217 words
(3.5 pages)
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Preconceived Notions of Western-Europe - ... Nonetheless, to the Kamea this is an important way of forming kin ties and must be recognized as such. Although different types of trees are planted to form this bond, the Yangwa tree is the most important. A man plants this type of ficus from the cuttings of his own tree after the birth of his son. The tree takes approximately 10 to 15 years to reach maturation, which reflects the boy’s transition to manhood. The tree serves not only has means of creating kinship ties, but it is also important in male initiation ceremonies and rituals....   [tags: societal relations, arthropological studies] 1179 words
(3.4 pages)
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Karen Tei Yamashita's Tropic of Orange - ... However, they take on this responsibility because of the love they have for their grandchildren. Not only are these grandparents voluntarily taking care of their younger grandchildren, they are “providing care for their grandchildren in informal, private care arrangements without the involvement of the child welfare system” (Letiecq, et al., 2008, p. 996). At age 10 years old, Larry was adopted back into his biological family with his aunt and uncle. He then began to discover his childhood dreams in which were established with his foster brothers as a younger boy....   [tags: novel analysis]
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2233 words
(6.4 pages)
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Humanity's Penchant for Relationships - As humans, we are prone to form groups. It’s simply in our nature to depend on one another for survival purposes, and one of the ways that humans structure these groups is based on relatedness. Within this sphere of relatedness, one comes across kinship. Kinship is commonly defined as the state or quality of being kin, i.e., sharing a common ancestor. Western society has stretched the idea of common ancestry, and thusly kinship, to its maximum by drawing a clear distinction between mothers and fathers along with their families (hence the use of the words patrilineal and matrilineal)....   [tags: Social Influences on Culture] 1422 words
(4.1 pages)
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The Roles of Family in the Philippines - ... The children are taught to respect and obey their parents. The elder sibling, especially the girl, is trained to be her mother’s assistant. She learns to look after her younger siblings and to manage the home. Elder sibling also gets respect from the younger ones. Filipino children are assigned home chores to train them to be responsible. The family molds the child’s character. It is where moral values are first being taught. The parents are the ones responsible in inculcating good manners and right conduct to their children that they will carry on as they grow up....   [tags: discipline, bonds, relatives] 603 words
(1.7 pages)
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The Mbuti Culture - Mbuti Culture Introduction The Mbuti people are known as foragers because their main source of survival lies on hunting and gathering as they move from one place to another. They originated from a region in Africa called Congo. The Mbuti people even with their fairly decent population prefer to be grouped into smaller groups or bands which are mostly made up of close relatives. They live in the rainforests of central Africa, where they have lived popularly for more than 6000 years now. Different anthropologists such as Nowak and Laird (2010), and Butler (2006), recommended that these residents of jungles contain an exclusive background; position, morals and everyday life is entirely throu...   [tags: Sociology]
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2264 words
(6.5 pages)
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Indian Slavery and Islamic Slavery - ... 2. The lack of incorporating the economic function of slaves in the society. Regarding the first point, the notion of 'assimilation' into the Islamic society was a contested terrain between masters and slaves. The “hope” of be totally incorporated in the new group, was resisted by the master, in order to forbid the foreigners became in an equal. Therefore, the alien condition was maintained because was the main justification of the slave condition, however at the same time, the “Islamization” prevented the formation of a separated slave class, with full awareness of their situation....   [tags: african continent, commerce and trade] 1513 words
(4.3 pages)
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Overlap in the Theories of Chagnon and Morgan - Cultural anthropology is defined as a branch of anthropology deals with human culture, especially in respect to social structure, language, law, politics, religion, magic, art, and technology (“Defining Anthropology”). In this essay, I will talk of the lives of two very prominent anthropologists. The first is Lewis Henry Morgan who was active in the late 1800s and second, the controversial anthropologist Napoleon Chagnon who started his work in the 1960s. Even with the large gap in time, quite a few of their ideologies and theories do overlap....   [tags: Cultural Anthropology, Anthropologists]
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1132 words
(3.2 pages)
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Geoffrey Chaucer's The Shipman's Tale - ... It is important, however, to acknowledge that exchange in the tale involves more than money and sex; that, while seen as a liberating refusal of the confines of social status, these transactions work simultaneously to solidify a gendered kinship system. The wife is certainly given the opportunity to take on numerous mercantile roles that allow her to participate in the economics of the tale, but unlike her male counterparts, her liberty is clearly limited. Unlike the Monk and the Merchant, her body is not just the source of the services she provides, but a physical gift to be shared between and possessed by the men of the story....   [tags: the Canterbury Tales, structure and characters] 1513 words
(4.3 pages)
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Antigone vs. Creon - In the Greek play Antigone writer Sophocles illustrates the clash between the story’s main character Antigone and her powerful uncle, Creon. King Creon of Thebes is an ignorant and oppressive ruler. In the text, there is a prevailing theme of rules and order in which Antigone’s standards of divine justice conflict with Creon’s will as the king. Antigone was not wrong in disobeying Creon, because he was evil and tyrannical. The authors of “Antigone: Kinship, Justice, and the Polis,” and “Assumptions and the Creation of Meaning: Reading Sophocles’ Antigone.” agree with the notion that Antigone performs the role of woman and warrior at once....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1354 words
(3.9 pages)
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The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis - The selected chapter Words and Culture is written by Ronald Wardhaugh in his book An Introduction to Sociolinguistics. This chapter focuses on the interreationship between language and culture. The author first introduces the Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis, which claims that language has strong influence on culture. He then discusses the study of kinship terms, (folk) taxonomies, color terms, prototypes, and taboo and euphrmisms used in different cultures to furthur support the hypothesis. The Sapir-Whorf Hypothesis illustrates the stucture of one language strongly affect the world-view of its speakers....   [tags: language, sociolinguistics, culture]
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996 words
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Black, White, and Indian:Race and the Unmaking of an American, by Claudio Saunt - Did the five-generation family known as the Grayson’s chronicled in detail by Claudio Saunt in his non-fiction book, Black, White, and Indian: Race and the Unmaking of an American deny their common origins to conform to “America’s racial hierarchy?” Furthermore, use “America’s racial hierarchy as a survival strategy?” I do not agree with Saunt’s argument whole-heartedly. I refute that the Grayson family members used free will and made conscious choices regarding the direction of their family and personal lives....   [tags: Racial Conformity, Survival Strategy]
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The Importance of Gender, Race and Reproduction in Laboring Women by Jennifer Morgan - ... African women hold knowledge about the pastoral and agricultural work “in the planting and cultivation of fields the daily task of a good Negro Woman” (145). While Creole women were subordinated, with the job of produce and reproduce. When it came to body, European women’s bodies were seeing as fragile. After birth the rest for a while before they could stand back again or return to their activities “European observers believed the post-delivery period of abstinence lasted three months, and others commented up two- to three year period of breast-feeding”(66)....   [tags: african women, slaves, myths]
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The Tragedy of Gay Marriage - Sam Schulman’s “The Worst Thing About Gay Marriage” presents an interesting argument against gay marriage that hinges upon maintaining a traditional form of marriage. He actually claims that gay marriage is “unnecessary”(381). According to Schulman, there are 4 primary effects of marriage within his definition he calls the kinship system. First, marriage protects and controls a woman’s sexuality. Second, the possible pairings are limited by the kinship system to avoid incest or other taboos. Third, marriage creates a situation where licit sex can occur....   [tags: Sam Schulman, Marriage] 1743 words
(5 pages)
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Matriarchial vs. Patriarchial Values in Antigone - Matriarchial vs. Patriarchial Values in Antigone In Sophocles’s Antigone, Antigone and Creon represent opposing sets of values. Antigone stands for the matriarchal beliefs while Creon stands for the patriarchal beliefs. Antigone’s beliefs are founded upon the sanctity of kinship and the ritual association with the gods of the earth. She places these values of universal humanity above the laws of man and loyalty to the state. Creon, on the other hand, stands for the loyalty to the city and its laws over the loyalty to kinship....   [tags: Papers] 1193 words
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Customs of the Arunta Society - The Arunta are a group of Australian Aborigines who have many customs and reasons for why they do what they do. Their customs reflect their society because everything they do has a reason. Some customs may have come about because of the environment, the natural resources, or possibly just beliefs. There are several customs about family and kinship. An Arunta camp usually has one to two families. The Arunta live in such small groups so they do not have to worry about hunting a lot of food for big camps....   [tags: essays research papers] 513 words
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Eighteenth Century Colonial Women - Eighteenth Century Colonial Women In order to fully understand and analyze a period of time, a full examination of people's everyday life is quite necessary. Although inferior to men, the roles and status of women in eighteenth century colonial America, contributed to the prospering society. The role of the family and extended kinship ties in the lives of African Americans is seen as a unifying and supporting force in times of suffering. The role and status of an eighteenth century colonial woman was clearly an overlooked responsibility....   [tags: Papers] 524 words
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Comparion of In Seach of Respect by Philippe Bourgous and Shattering Silence by Begona Aretxaga - ... She goes further by asserting that violence affects men and women differently by arguing that the manners in which violence is gendered are not fixed but constantly shifting, depending on the likelihood of history, social class, and ethnic identity. In search of respect analyzes the social marginalization of Puerto Ricans living in East Harlem, New York City, USA. The friendship made with Philippe and the drug dealers were fundamental to the book’s nature; the very personal things that the subjects reveal to Bourgois make it extremely honest and give you a full picture for what exactly is happening and their reasoning behind their actions....   [tags: themes, history, class, identity] 1438 words
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Variation in Address Forms for Arab Married and Unmarried Woeman in the World - ... Parkinson (1985) describes the address system in Arabic societies; he studies terms of address in Egyptian Arabic (EA). His data is collected from naturally occurring conversations for more than one year from different speech events in different settings in Cairo. He finds that the (EA) terms of address system is very much alive. Farghal and Shakir's (1994) study explores Jordanian relation social honorifics, they try to systemize these honorifics and to test the socio-pragmatic constraints governing their use....   [tags: politeness theory]
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Identity, Society, and Gender Inequality of Women in North West India - Gender inequality refers to biased and unfair treatment or perceptions of individuals based on their gender. Gender inequality is one of the major problems faced by the human society. Our society bestowed different roles on men and women respectively. It’s a hard reality that women have been ill-treated in every society for ages in India. A woman is considered as inferior to man in our society. In patriarchal society the wives are expected to be modest, meek and dutiful to their husbands and other members of families....   [tags: punjab, gender inequality, discrimination]
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Ahmad Wali Karzai: Power and Corruption in Afghanistan - Power is one of the key terms in changing the political and social destiny of the people within a specific territory. Different usage of power may clearly results in failure or success of the citizens in the society. Corruption has been recognized as one of the major hinders to the “good governance and rule of law and as an obstacle for sustainable, private-sector-led economic growth” (Basar, Eray. p. 4). According to the Transparency International one of the definitions used for corruption is the “abuse of entrusted power for private gain”, thus The Asian Development Bank describe the corruption as “behavior in which officials improperly and unlawfully enrich themselves and/or those close...   [tags: Afghanistan]
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1352 words
(3.9 pages)
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Social Organization and Laws in the Trobiand Islands - ... For each canoe, there is a rightful owner and a group of men who act as his crew (Malinowski, 1985, 18). While some may view it as disorganized and chaotic, it is a complex economic system used to govern social relations. “All these men, who as a rule belong to the same sub-clan, are bound to each other and to their fellow-villagers by mutual obligations” (Malinowski, 1985, 18). In addition to that, the owners and crew members are to surrender their privileges to any of their relatives and friends, usually as a form of repayment (Malinowski, 1985, 18)....   [tags: Malinowski theories ] 1621 words
(4.6 pages)
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The Mbuti Pygmies in the Ituri Forest - The Mbuti Pygmies in the Ituri Forest The Mbuti Pygmies in the Ituri forest in central Africa are foragers who use a combination of foraging, net hunters, and archers. Their kinship, social organization, and gender relations make them a unique band. Even though they live in the rainforest of equatorial Africa with hardly any possessions, they are happy, peaceful people. The pygmies are small people who are typically less than five feet tall. The Mbuti have lived in the Ituri forest for many thousands of years....   [tags: World Civilization ]
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2096 words
(6 pages)
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The Powhantan Peoples and Their Loss - As the English were just coming into Tsenacomoco located on the eastern side of Virginia at Chesapeake Bay, the Virginia Algonquian speaking Indians known as the Powhatan attacked from within the woods using bow and arrows. From this, the English settlers returned fire with their muskets. The Powhatan Indians retreated back to their village known as Wereocomoco, and alarmed their chief, Wahunsunacock more commonly known as Chief Powhatan. The English settlers followed the Powhatan Indians back to their village where they were immediately met by about seventy warriors with their faces brightly painted, ready to attack....   [tags: native american tribe history] 2468 words
(7.1 pages)
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The Effects of European Immigration on Australian Aboriginal Culture - Introduction The Aborigines are the indigenous people of Australia. According to their traditional beliefs, the Aborigines have inhabited Australia since the beginning of time, but most modern dating techniques have placed the first native Australians at closer to 60,000 years ago, based on carbon dating of fossils and knowledge of geological changes in the region. Sea levels have fluctuated throughout history and were 200 meters lower at the time the ancestors of the Aborigines were thought to have made their way to Australia....   [tags: Aboriginal Australia History Essays]
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Nepotism in American Business and Politics - Nepotism in American Business and Politics During the November 2000 presidential elections, two children tried to make daddy proud. First there was Albert Gore Jr. – the son of a powerful and respected senator of Tennessee – who was no stranger to politics and privilege. As a child he attended the prestigious St. Alban’s School and while growing up, it was common to see then Vice President Richard Nixon as a guest at the family dinner table. Then there was George W. Bush – a third-generation politician, with his grandfather a former senator, his brother the governor of Florida, and his father being former president....   [tags: Exploratory Essays Research Papers]
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1825 words
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Reciprocity in Aboriginal Australian Communities - Reciprocity is not a simple concept when it comes to the Aboriginal culture. It can mean many different things depending on the situation it is being used to define. Reciprocity may be the notion of taking care of your kin as they will do for you. It might be the give and take between families and communities in which everyone shares what they have. Reciprocity may be being held responsible for your kin’s actions. It might be the approximately equal trades conducted between nearby communities. It may be the taking of a life in exchange for another....   [tags: Anthropology]
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2304 words
(6.6 pages)
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Is Foster Care Really Better? - “In the United States, foster care operates on the local level, rather than on the national level” (Harris, 2004).The state’s division of social services and part of the state department of health and human services run the whole foster care service (Harris, 2004). The foster care system is great when they remove children from harm but they need to do better background checks which would cut down on multiple moves, figure out a better system of getting children out of the system and into homes, and they need to figure out how to accommodate out of state parents....   [tags: Family Issues]
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1176 words
(3.4 pages)
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The Kennewick Man and NAGPRA - On July 26, 1996 two individuals were walking along the bank of the Columbia River near Kennewick, Washington, did not expect to find one of the oldest complete skeletal remains in the world. While, Kennewick man has gained considerable notoriety, debates have grown over the application of the Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act (NAGPRA) and whether the Native Americans or Archaeologists have the rights to the body. As soon as the body was found it was studied by anthropologist James Chatters and he discovered “that the skull had characteristics unlike those of modern Native Americans” (Native Americans and Archeologists)....   [tags: Native American Archaeology]
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Anthropology and Beginning of Society - The Cayapa Indians: The Cayapas Indians, specifically the Chachi are primary hunter-gatherers that provide scenarios that exemplify the division of labor resulting from pair bonding and male hunting bias. Additionally, Behavioral Regularities transforming into Institutionalized Rules regarding the incest taboo and elements of the African kinship model are present within Chachi society. Milton Atschulers studies of The Chachi are based on the underlying assumption of social control by law. Atschuler is characterized by a functional-realist epistemological approach, and as such he views law as a relationship based on social norms that are essentially agreements between communities....   [tags: Anthropology, Ancient History]
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2025 words
(5.8 pages)
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Patriarchal Values in African Nations - 1) As in most cultures of the world, patriarchal values shaped male-female relationships in many African nations. But women are often forced to take on a more male typical role here in the United States. A shift in gender roles can cause many marital problems. Male violence against women is a frequent presenting problem in family therapy (McGoldrick, Giordano, & Garcia-Preto, 2005, p. 81-82). Though, in Yesterdays situation we cannot relate her intimate partner violence problems to this gender role shift, this is a serious issue that must be examined in family therapy....   [tags: ethnicities, male-female relationships, HIV]
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2027 words
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Taking a Look at the Structuralism Movement - ... Developed through Ferdinand de Saussure he proposed that languages were constructed full of hidden rules that practitioners know but are unable to articulate. The fundamental way of thinking about the world; this predominantly concerned with the perception and description of structures. 1. The idea of wholeness, internal coherence 2. The idea of transformation, new material constantly by and through it 3. The idea of self regulation, no appeals beyond itself in order to validate its transformation procedures The argument is that structure of human thought processes is the same in all cultures and these mental processes exist in the form of binary oppositions....   [tags: Strauss, Mauss, Durkheim, de Saussure] 600 words
(1.7 pages)
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