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Your search returned 186 essays for "kierkegaard":
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Kierkegaard's Fear And Trembling - Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling What is a human person. How do human beings relate to God. Who am I. Why do I exist. I. Soeren Kierkegaard, a famous theologian of the 19th Century, wrote Fear and Trembling in 1843 in response to Hegelianism. Kierkegaard takes on the pseudonymous role of Jonannes de Silentio and speaks on modern peoples' attitudes toward doubt and faith. He believes humans are creatures entrenched in reason and doubt but not in the same sense as Descartes, a French mathematician, scientist and philosopher....   [tags: Soeren Kierkegaard] 1641 words
(4.7 pages)
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Faith in Kierkegaard's Breaking the Waves - Faith in Kierkegaard's Breaking the Waves In Soren Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling, he discusses the "Three Movements to Faith." For Kierkegaard, faith of any kind involves a paradox. This paradox, as well as Kierkegaard's suggested path to faith, is illustrated by the main characters of Breaking the Waves, Bess and Jan. Kierkegaard explains there are steps one can take towards faith; however, they are so difficult he believes only one person, the "Knight of Faith," has completed the movements....   [tags: Kierkegaard Breaking the Waves Essays] 633 words
(1.8 pages)
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Concept of Anxiety by Soren Kierkegaard - The Moment and Inwardness I. Introduction In The Concept of Anxiety, S�ren Kierkegaard deals with human anxiety about the possibility posed by freedom as it relates to sinfulness and spiritual progress. This paper will show that Kierkegaard?s concept of the moment and his prescription for inwardness, both in the context of spirituality, are connected. Importantly, inwardness depends on the moment and the possibility of transition that does not take place in time, transition that seems sudden if spotted from a temporal perspective....   [tags: Philosophy Soren Kierkegaard] 1753 words
(5 pages)
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Faith in Fear and Trembling by Kierkegaard - Kierkegaard believes that true faith can only be attained through a double movement of giving up rationality or logic, while at the same time believing one can understand logically. In “Fear and Trembling” Kierkegaard relates true faith to the Knight of infinite resignation and the Knight of faith; in this paper, I will examine this claim and show why Kierkegaard’s analogy is an excellent metaphor for the double movement which is required in one’s quest to attain faith and why. Kierkegaard’s position on faith is represented with the Knight of infinite resignation and the Knight of faith....   [tags: Faith Literary Analysis]
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2216 words
(6.3 pages)
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The Father of Existentialism: Soren Kierkegaard - During the late 19th and 20th centuries, several philosophers debated on the doctrine differences that all philosophical thinking begin with the human in terms of thinking, acting and feeling. The fundamental concepts of the externalist philosophers are that they believed that the existence of human conditions is the main problem to share similar ontology. Soren Kierkegaard is considered to be the father of existentialism. Although, he did not use the word ‘existentialism’, but initially the concept that no society or religion is the main cause that leads an individual to live a life with sincerity or passionately....   [tags: philosophy, human condition, doctrine]
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1053 words
(3 pages)
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Existentialism: Kierkegaard and Nietzsche - The Merriam – Webster Dictionary defines existentialism as a chiefly 20th century philosophical movement embracing diverse doctrines but centering on analysis of individual existence in an unfathomable universe and the plight of the individual who must assume ultimate responsibility for acts of free will without any certain knowledge of what is right or wrong or good or bad (Merriam, 2011). In other words, an existentialist believes that our natures are the natures we make for ourselves, the meaning of our existence is that we just exist and there may or may not be a meaning for the existence, and we have to individually decide what is right or wrong and good or bad for ourselves....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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1122 words
(3.2 pages)
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Soren Kierkegaard on God - ... Ethics are the rules or laws that exist within the city or community, which help to maintain order and justice. There is a paradox within the ideas of faith of religion, and ethics. The religious idea is that the single individual is higher than the universal (God before the world), and that one must make the leap of faith and give infinite resignation. On the ethical level, Abraham is considered a murderer who almost kills his only beloved son. The paradox is created by the explanation of why it is that this murderer should be praised as the “knight of faith.” “Faith is just this paradox, that the single individual as the particular is higher than the universal, is justified before the...   [tags: the Seventh Seal, philosophical analysis] 1786 words
(5.1 pages)
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The Sickness Unto Death According to Kierkegaard - 1. Kierkegaard believes that truth is only a subjective process. Truth only exists from the subjective existing of the individual and cannot be found in a complete system. Objective truth to Kierkegaard is a simply an idea created by the illusion of subjective existence that one can have complete and true objective knowledge of something that exists out in the world. This is evident when he states, “In the objective sense, thought is understood as being a pure thought; this corresponds in an equally abstract-objective sense to its object, which object is therefore the thought itself, and truth becomes correspondence of thought with itself....   [tags: existencialistm, truth] 1065 words
(3 pages)
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Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling: A Solution to Kierkegaard’s Despair Over Christianity - In Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling, the concept of the Knight of Faith is an exalted one, a unique title awarded to those whose devotion to God goes far beyond what is even comprehensible or expected for the average man, who has an aesthetic or ethical life. We are told by Kierkegaard that this Knight of Faith, when in a situation where resignation appears to be the only solution to a problem, puts his faith in what appears to be the absurd, and believes that the solution that he desires lies in God....   [tags: The Knight of Faith] 1191 words
(3.4 pages)
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Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein - Kierkegaard and Wittgenstein The connections between Ludwig Wittgenstein and Soren Kierkegaard as philosophers are not at all immediately obvious. On the surface, Wittgenstein deals with matters concerning the incorrect use of philosophical language and Kierkegaard focuses almost exclusively on answering the question 'how to become a Christian'. But this account belies deeper structural similarities between these men's important works. Thus, this paper suggests that their methods, rather than exclusively content, contain a strong parallel on which a natural and hopefully fruitful examination of their work can be based....   [tags: Papers] 2160 words
(6.2 pages)
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Soren Kierkegaard's Fear And Trembling - How does the individual assure himself that he is justified. In Soren Kierkegaard's Fear and Trembling, Abraham, found in a paradox between two ethical duties, is confronted with this question. He has ethical duties to be faithful to God and also to his son, Isaac. He believes that God demands him to sacrifice Isaac. But, Abraham, firmly adhering to his faith, submitted to what he believed was the will of God. By using his perspective and that of his alternative guise, Johannes de Silentio, Kierkegaard concentrates on the story of Abraham in such a way that his audience must choose between two extremes....   [tags: Judgment Ethics Dilemma] 958 words
(2.7 pages)
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Kierkegaard and P.M. Moller on Immortality - Kierkegaard and P.M. Moller on Immortality P.M. Moller and His Relation to S.A. Kierkegaard Although virtually unknown today outside of Danish philosophical circles, Moller (1794-1838) was, during his lifetime, esteemed as one of Denmark’s most loved poets, and beginning in 1831 he held the position of professor of philosophy at the University of Denmark. While at the university Moller taught Moral and Greek Philosophy, and his early philosophical position has been regarded as Hegelian. Kierkegaard began his university studies in 1830, and the young professor made a deep impression upon him....   [tags: Essays Papers] 2281 words
(6.5 pages)
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Analysis of Soren Kierkegaard’s Novel: Fear and Trembling - ... The predicament is not exclusive to Abraham's scenario. Kierkegaard’s target audience were people of his generation who regarded themselves as “Christians” – those who have faith in the power and holiness of God. By accentuating the trouble of understanding Abraham's response to the divine intervention, he highlights the complexity of faith itself. Imbedded in his scrutiny of the story of Abraham is the question: would you do what Abraham did. How could you do such a thing. It is fair to assume anyone who really deliberates over these problems would conclude that it is improbable he or she would have behaved in a manner similar to that of Abraham....   [tags: Christianity, Faith, Questions] 687 words
(2 pages)
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Sorean Kierkegaard and Paul Tillich's Views on the Role of Faith - ... Kierkegaard's faith is one that he refers to as authectic faith because it relies on one knowing that the it is impossible to explain and there is no reason for someone to believe in it. Where as, many Christians saw faith as something that could be true and poteniatly have reason behind it. He saw this as hope instead of faith and ulitmatly thought such faith was inauthecitc. In essence the choice of choosing authentic faith is not just a choice but in the renewnal of choices that abodon the logicial sense of reason and embrame the impossible....   [tags: philosophy, god, morality] 844 words
(2.4 pages)
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Kierkegaard - Kierkegaard Kierkegaard felt that subjective reflection was more crucial to the individual life than objective reflection because it focused on passion and human existence instead of logic and impersonal truth. The objective world is the world of facts and truth independent of the perceptions of humans. Objective reflection focuses on what actually is, in the objective world. Objective reflection centers on the things and ideas in the world that can give meaning to life. The subjective world is the world of human thoughts, feelings, and perceptions....   [tags: Papers] 518 words
(1.5 pages)
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Nietzsche, Marx, and Kierkegaard - Nietzsche, Marx, and Kierkegaard Zarathustra is always a favorite, with the ringing of God is dead throughout the mountains. Re-evaluating our idols, discovering the significance of their dethroning and how it relates to the intricate web that we create for our lives. Zarathustra, holy man in his blasphemy, ushering in a new era where the last men are eradicated, the filthy vermin masquerading intelligence led by the promise of cheese. Formerly the world was a mad place, filled with mice traps, and the drool pours down their uncomprehending faces....   [tags: Papers] 398 words
(1.1 pages)
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Possible Explanation of Kierkegaard’s Reasoning - Possible Explanation of Kierkegaard’s Reasoning As some philosophers suggest, an individual may only know what he knows through experience. What is sensed equals what is known. Because we understand things through our senses, then what we understand must also be expressed through our senses. We represent that knowledge through language. Language is a means of transferring our experiences to a concrete, literal form, so the sensuous can be made known in the psyche. To describe a snake (itself a linguistic representation of my experience), I might use the word, “slimy,” thus, I have distinguished one feeling from another feeling....   [tags: Essays Papers] 788 words
(2.3 pages)
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Kierkegaard and Abraham: A Literary Tool and Belief in the Ideal Christian-Existentialist - Abraham, the father of the Christian, Jewish, and Islamic religions is held up by Kierkegaard as the perfect model for faith in Fear and Trembling. The specific example most strongly used in Kierkegaard’s writing is the unhesitant actions of Abraham to heed God’s call and sacrifice his only son and promised heir to his kingdom, Isaac. Abraham faithfully follows God’s command without remorse, doubt, sadness, or anger. It is only moments before the murder and sacrifice of Isaac that God intervenes and send a ram in his stead....   [tags: Literary Analysis ]
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1631 words
(4.7 pages)
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The Chicken or the Egg - Most have heard the classical paradox of the chicken and the egg. Which came first, the chicken or the egg. The same question can apply to the individual and society. Which comes first. To answer the question, a concept of the individual must be established and the origins of society must be explored. Only then can one compare and contrast their roles in relation to the other. Two revolutionary thinkers, Soren Kierkegaard and Bertolt Brecht, will give their arguments of opposition to try to determine whether the power between society and the individual is pulled in one particular direction than the other....   [tags: Soren Kierkegaard, Bertolt Brecht] 1060 words
(3 pages)
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Edvard Munch: Perception of Anxiety - Introduction How did Edvard Munch perceive anxiety. Edvard Munch, a famous world known painter from Norway, was able to express his suppressed feelings of fear and anxiety onto a canvas with an ability that both amazed and scared the people of the world. He used his anxiety of life, love and death, to inspire people, and let them see the troubles in his life. Edvard Munch is especially known for his works ‘The scream’ and ‘Madonna’. Munch popularity is due to his extraordinary ability to convey a deep and raw emotion from the unconscious onto the canvas leaving it to the viewers to interpret, feel and reflect....   [tags: the scream, madonna, Kierkegaard]
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2798 words
(8 pages)
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Kierkegaard: "Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself" as a Basis for Ethics - Kierkegaard: "Love Thy Neighbor as Thyself" as a Basis for Ethics "Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy might. This is the first and great commandment. And the second is like unto it, Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself. On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets." [Matthew 22:37-40, AV] "When you open the door which you shut in order to pray to God, the first person you meet as you go out is your neighbour whom you shall love....   [tags: Morals Philosophy Philosophical Essays]
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2450 words
(7 pages)
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Defending Organized Religion and Kierkegaard’s Anti-Climacus - Defending Organized Religion and Kierkegaard’s Anti-Climacus Practice in Christianity, written by the pseudonym[1] of Anti-Climacus, describes the ideal Christian life from the perspective of the ideal Christian. ‘Anti-’ in the sense of ‘Anti-Climacus’ is not an indication of opposition (to Climacus, the ‘devoutly non-Christian’ ethicist and editor of Either/Or whose esthetic sense was particularly keen). Rather, “Anti-” is an older form of “ante”, meaning ‘before’ both in the sense of time and in the sense of rank....   [tags: Essays Papers]
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3297 words
(9.4 pages)
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What is Diapsalmata? - ... For Either/Or, Kierkegaard wrote under pseudonym Victor Eremita, which is Latin for “the victorious hermit.” Victor begins with a preface describing his findings of two letters in an antique writing desk. The first letter encapsulates the first of the two volumes of his book, “Either.” “Either” is pseudonymously written by an unidentified “A,” or the aesthete. The second volume, “Or,” describes the marriage and responsibilities of author “B,” or Judge William. Kierkegaard uses these pseudonyms, as well as another named Johannes, to describe the aesthetic and ethical spheres of existence an individual faces, finally arriving at his preferred religious realm....   [tags: aphorism, anecdotes, Soren Kierkegaard ] 1216 words
(3.5 pages)
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Leap of Faith - The Leap of Faith In his book, Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Soren Kierkegaard talks about the difference between subjective and objective truth. When talking about subjective truth, he compares it to taking a “leap of faith”. This means that you will believe something no matter what, and you don’t need any evidence to back it up. He later connects the “leap of faith” to religion. “Through the “leap of faith,” in which one affirms the proposition that God did exist in time, one is able to enter into a “God-relationship,” and thereby attains “an eternal happiness” (Schacht, 308)....   [tags: Soren Kierkegaard, faith, religion]
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903 words
(2.6 pages)
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Comparing and Contrasting Nietzsche’s Preparatory Human Being and Kierkegaard’s Knight of Faith - Take a minute to relax. Enjoy the lightness, or surprising heaviness, of the paper, the crispness of the ink, and the regularity of the type. There are over four pages in this stack, brimming with the answer to some question, proposed about subjects that are necessarily personal in nature. All of philosophy is personal, but some philosophers may deny this. Discussed here are philosophers that would not be that silly. Two proto-existentialists, Søren Kierkegaard and Friedrich Nietzsche, were keen observers of humanity, and yet their conclusions were different enough to seem contradictory....   [tags: philosophy]
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1475 words
(4.2 pages)
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Fear and Trembling by Søren Kierkegaard -   In the book Fear and Trembling the constant use of “I”, “me”, “my”, and “you” is the way that Nothomb tries to convey to the reader how the Japanese actually go against their claim of being a collective society. Nothomb reveals, through tone, the hypocrisy of the Japanese via characterization in order to illustrate that individualism is present in every society. There are three key Japanese characters that Amélie encounters that help prove (find a better word) this point. Fubuki • SELFISH-LIKE TONE In the collective society of Japan there is a certain stigma about women like Fubuki that set them apart....   [tags: notromb, individualism, society] 524 words
(1.5 pages)
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Kierkegaards View on Faith - Kierkegaards View on Faith Kierkegaard was a Danish philosopher in the mid 1800s. He is known to be the father of existentialism and was at least 70 years ahead of his time. Kierkegaard set out to attack Kant’s rational ethics and make attacks on the Christianity of our day. He poses the question, how do we understand faith. He states that faith equals the absurd. In “Fear and Trembling”, he uses the story of Abraham and his son Isaac to show an example of faith as the absurd. The story of God asking Abraham to sacrifice his son Isaac signifies a break in the theory that ethics and religion go hand in hand....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Essays] 1037 words
(3 pages)
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Existentialism and Its Role today - The Good Life is an expression representing how one would like to live out their life. In other words, how that person achieves happiness. There are three theories that correlate to the Good Life: daoism, stoicism, and existentialism. Since each person defines their happiness differently, each person has their own opinion as to whether or not what is read to be correct or not. The goal is to at least shine a light onto what everyone seems drawn towards. Existentialism is an important theory to consider in order to achieve the Good Life....   [tags: Jean Paul Sartre, Kierkegarrd]
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805 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Individual Being in Hegel's Philosophy - The only similarity between Marx and Kierkegaard – beyond disagreeing with Hegel – is they both find Hegel to be apathetic. As Kierkegaard summarized in Either/Or, and as Marx exemplifies in his many writings, either one is to resign themselves to inaction for the greater good or one commits to action regardless of the consequences. Hegel, they argue, commits himself to the former. He resigns himself to universal ethics, acting on the greater good at the expense of the individual. Here, Kierkegaard and Marx swerve away from Hegel....   [tags: Philosophy]
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1745 words
(5 pages)
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The Principle of Credultiy, the Will to Believe, and the Role of Rationality and Evidence in Religious Experience - The Principle of Credultiy, the Will to Believe, and the Role of Rationality and Evidence in Religious Experience Explain the principle of credulity, the will to believe and the role of rationality and evidence in religious experience The principle of credulity, the will to believe and the role of rationality and evidence all play crucial roles while attempting to explain religious experience. The principle of credulity states that religious experiences should be taken at their face value when we have no positive reason to doubt them....   [tags: Papers] 572 words
(1.6 pages)
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What Makes a Perfect Day - “If I were to wish for anything, I should not wish for wealth and power, but for the passionate sense of the potential, for the eye which, ever young and ardent, sees the possible. Pleasure disappoints, possibility never. And what wine is so sparking, what so fragrant, what so intoxicating, as possibility!” – Søren Kierkegaard. Kierkegaard was on to something. As anyone who’s relished in the anticipation of a Friday only to be disappointed by Saturday Morning can attest; the promise of possibility often outweighs the delivered reality....   [tags: desires, possibility, reality, potential, flaws] 537 words
(1.5 pages)
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Understanding Human Nature: Examples from Philosophy and the Arts - Understanding Human Nature: Examples from Philosophy and the Arts ABSTRACT: Ours is not the first time philosophers have looked to art for examples to illustrate their arguments. One example would be Kierkegaard, who turned to Mozart's operas in an attempt to expose what he called the aesthetic realm of existence. I hold that if Kierkegaard lived today, he would consider the main character of Nikita Mikhalkov's Dark Eyes (1987) as a prototype of the aesthetic way of existence. In order to support my thesis, I first discuss Kierkegaard's theory of the three spheres of existence....   [tags: Philosophy] 3521 words
(10.1 pages)
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The Individual’s Existentialist Struggle Rooted in Fear - The individual is naturally comprised of a conglomeration of cumbersome and distressing emotions, such as fear and distress. It is within inane circumstances that human beings are able to experience inherent fear. In moments of fear, people are able to apply existentialist thought, for it is through fear in which people decide to act. Existentialism is a philosophical theory that is governed by authenticity, which is that the existence of a person is determined through the acts of their own will (“Existentialism”)....   [tags: Power of Fear]
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2448 words
(7 pages)
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A Call to the Task: The Attunement of Fear and Trembling - In the “Attunement” of Soren Kierkegaard’s Fear and Trembling, the author produces four beautiful variations on God’s temptation of Abraham in Genesis 22. In each, Abraham fails at his test in some way; even though in each he offers his son, he misses the full movements of philosophy and faith that the true Abraham completed. Each is closed by a brief image of a child being weaned, presumably a metaphor of the past story. Characteristically of Kierkegaard’s non-prescriptive style, we are told that these stories are the way in which a certain man has tried to understand Abraham; we are invited, but not forced, into contemplation of these various stories....   [tags: Literary Review] 1727 words
(4.9 pages)
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The Song Unwritten by Natasha Bedingfield - ... When things such as war or mass genocide erupt “In angst we confront the fundamental precariousness of existence” (Park) until anxiety burst out of the bubble it is placed in and renders us helpless. Even though anxiety seems deathly dangerous many existentialists view it as productive and healthy. Heidegger interprets what Being is and how relates to Human Being. During times of war is what causes people to seek the phenomenological interpretation of human existence.(Heidegger) We live in understanding of being, yet its meaning is cloaked in darkness and this requires us to face the question of the meaning of being....   [tags: existential movement, music] 864 words
(2.5 pages)
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Ethics: God and Abraham - The first problem, “Is there a teleological suspension of the ethical?” begins by declaring that the ethical is the universe which applies to everyone. However, our purpose in the universe, is to act ethically. “As soon as the single individual wants to assert himself in his particularity, in direct opposition to the universe, he sins, and only by recognizing this can he again reconcile himself with the universe” (Kierkegaard, 1985, p. 83). I think that this statement makes sense because we cannot move forward in life unless we acknowledge the mistakes that we have made....   [tags: universe, ethics, sacrifice] 545 words
(1.6 pages)
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Religion: A Want or Need? - Religion is defined as a set of beliefs concerning the cause, nature, and purpose of the universe, especially when considered as the creation of a superhuman agency or agencies, usually involving devotional and ritual observances, and often containing a moral code governing the conduct of human affairs. Throughout time, religion has been debated to the point where many have philosophers have claimed it as a crutch for individuals in times of depression or despair. However, the purpose of religion has been argued numerous times and now the age old question remains whether or not religion is a want or a need....   [tags: Creator, Faith, Morality] 1117 words
(3.2 pages)
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Hamlet: An Existential Tragedy - ... Besides the act of killing being irrational as aforementioned, the Ghost illogically possesses an absolute understanding of the situation. To say that there are only two outcomes that will play out if Hamlet decides to act or stand idle is not just and cannot be explained with reason. Therefore, the complete essence of the Ghost in both physical form and psychological substance is absurd by nature and prompts the audience to question their own relationship with God. This portrayal of blind faith can be perceived as either fulfilling or meaningless by the audience and this enables them to develop an emotional response that reflects on their nature accordingly....   [tags: WIlliam Shakespeare, play analysis]
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1891 words
(5.4 pages)
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What is Existentialism? - ... For him social identity is a problem. It limits and reduces individuality. It influences commonality and if not paid careful attention to one may lose themselves in the crowd. People ought to make choices beyond their societies. He sees society an obstacle to human redemption. Attached, however, to the notion of freedom lies the element of responsibility. Once one removed her/himself from the clutches of dogma and the institutions one bears the responsibility of the choices and the actions they commit....   [tags: philosophical movement, existence] 1547 words
(4.4 pages)
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The Individual or Society - “Society exists only as a mental concept; in the real world there are only individuals.” What is the concept of the individual. The common notation is one who separates from society in the pursuit of his or her own needs, goals, and desires; to define his or her own self and to gain independence and self-reliance. However, an individual must enter into society to further his or her own self interest. Due to that contradiction, individualism is often contrasted with society or anti-individualism....   [tags: Sociology ]
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1245 words
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Black and White - In Sunset Limited, Black conveys Kierkegaard’s philosophy through his own life and words. In the beginning of the play, Black and White argue over the meaning of life—the former loving it, the latter trying to end it. Early on, Black tries to identify with White’s suicidal argument by noting that “Suffering and human destiny are the same thing” (55). Of course, Black’s admittance does not mean he believes in White’s argument, but instead that he understands White’s pain. Likewise, Kierkegaard’s description of life is similar to Black’s reasoning....   [tags: Literary Review] 817 words
(2.3 pages)
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The Beliefs of Philosophers and The Belief in God - The beliefs I have, and what has given me strength is combined with what I have been taught and what I have researched. Throughout this paper, there are five questions that has me describe life, but also describes the person I have become. The three philosophers I chose were all different, and all have something in common. What they all have in common is that they all stand by what they believe in. The three I have chosen are Aristotle, because I enjoy happiness and he believes it is the key to life....   [tags: buddha, greek, aristotle]
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1583 words
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Relationships in a World without God - Relationships in a World without God In a world in which lives are shaped by irreversible choices and by random events, a world in which everything occurs but once, existence seems to lose its substance. Life in this designless universe raises questions of identity and can cause turmoil between the relationships of the self to others, the self to history, and the self to God. Through the words of existentialist novelists and philosophers Milan Kundera and Jean-Paul Sartre, we witness the philosophical and psychological struggles for identity, existence, and ‘being’ of the characters in The Unbearable Lightness of Being, and Nausea....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Religion Essays] 2220 words
(6.3 pages)
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Existentialism In The Early 19th Century - Existentialism in the Early 19th Century Major Themes Because of the diversity of positions associated with existentialism, the term is impossible to define precisely. Certain themes common to virtually all existentialist writers can, however, be identified. The term itself suggests one major theme: the stress on concrete individual existence and, consequently, on subjectivity, individual freedom, and choice. Moral Individualism Most philosophers since Plato have held that the highest ethical good is the same for everyone; insofar as one approaches moral perfection, one resembles other morally perfect individuals....   [tags: essays research papers] 1641 words
(4.7 pages)
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Tragedy as a Catalyst for Character Development - When analyzing the use of tragedy-wisdom that stems from pain or sorrow- as a form of character development, one must mention Sophocles’ play Oedipus Rex yet more iconically Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet. Although traditionally ignored, Isak Dinesen, whom Thomas R. Wissen regarded as an author who’s “tales will not disappoint” must be included among the elite of authors of tragic stories (“The Ring” 237). Many are familiar with her best known pieces such as Out of Africa or Babbete’s Feast; however her most very skillful use of tragedy is in the short story The Ring (230)....   [tags: Literature]
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1608 words
(4.6 pages)
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TV Show: The Office - The American version of The Office debuted in 2005 with the start of its six-episode first season. After the airing of the “Pilot” episode, a reviewer from the Deseret Morning News commented, “Maybe […] after The Office dies a quick death on NBC, the network will decide that trying to Americanize British TV comedies isn’t such a great idea” (quoted in Pilot (The Office)). Despite its original negative reception, The Office went on to run nine successful seasons and has become a television favorite of individuals across America....   [tags: Morals, Bad Faith]
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1437 words
(4.1 pages)
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"The Second Coming" and the Death of God - Death of God theology is a theological movement dating back to the radical theologians of the 1960s, like Thomas Altizer and William Hamilton, and continuing in a more diverse form in the work of individuals like Slavoj Žižek and John Caputo. The movement can be traced back to the works of G.W.F. Hegel, of whom Thomas Altizers says, "The Phenomenology of Spirit is the first philosophical enactment of the Death of God,” (Altizer) and thinkers like Nietzsche, Lacan, Heidegger, Kierkegaard, and Derrida and poets like William Blake....   [tags: theological movements]
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1103 words
(3.2 pages)
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Can We Prove God Exists? - Philosophers, whether they are atheists, or believers have always been eager to discuss the existence of God. Some philosophers, such as St Thomas Aquinas, and St Anselm, believe that we have proven that God exists through our senses, logic, and experience. Others such as Soren Kierkegaard, and Holbach, feel that we will never have the answer to this question due to our human limitations, and reason. The believer tends to rely on faith for his belief, and claim they do not need proof in order to believe in the God's existence....   [tags: Philosophy] 564 words
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"The Second Coming" and the Death of God - Death of God theology is a theological movement dating back to the radical theologians of the 1960s, like Thomas Altizer and William Hamilton, and continuing in a more diverse form in the work of individuals like Slavoj Žižek and John Caputo. The movement can be traced back to the works of G.W.F. Hegel, of whom Thomas Altizers says, "The Phenomenology of Spirit (1807) is the first philosophical enactment of the Death of God,” and thinkers like Nietzsche, Marx, Freud, Lacan, Heidegger, Kierkegaard, and Derrida and poets like William Blake, Dante, and Milton....   [tags: liberation theology, sphinx]
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Science Cannot and Should Not Explain the Existence or Not Existence of God - There always been a question of God's existence in the world because for some individuals "seeing is believing." Thus if one cannot see, touch or hear God then does he actually exist. Some scientists or scholars will espouse that he does not indeed exist but there is a scientific explanation for everything from rainbows to the sun setting at dusk. For example, a rainbow is defined as an "optical and meteorological phenomenon that is caused by both reflection and refraction in water droplets in Earth's atmosphere, resulting in spectrum of light appearing in the sky." One who does not believe would confirm the aforementioned explanation of what a rainbow is and accept the scientific explanati...   [tags: faith, religious beliefs]
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Life has meaning by showing God’s love through service to others needs. - Life has meaning by showing God’s love through service to others needs. When attempting to answer the question of the meaning of life each person will give a different answer, one that would reflect their age, religious beliefs, personal history and current circumstances. For many the meaning of life can be best described as meeting a person’s basic needs for survival, as observed by Simone Weil. She classified the needs of the body as food, shelter, clothing, and physical security, whereas, the needs of the soul were meaning and value, rooted in freedom of choice (Ambrosio, 2008)....   [tags: Philosophy]
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The Evolution of the Existential Psyche of Raskolnikov through Crime and Punishment - The introspective and self-scrutinizing nature of Raskolnikov from Crime and Punishment, allows for us to delve into the existential rationales that warrant and influence the decisions and courses of action that he carries out. It is crucial to explore the workings of Raskolnikov’s mind, to understand the motives by which he is compelled by to perform the heinous murder of Alyona the pawnbroker. By examining Raskolnikov’s psyche, characterization, and decision making processes, which are characterized by his constant schisms and dichotomies, we can gain an understanding of how the portrayal of existentialist ideals as represented by Raskolnikov, evolve through the plot of the novel....   [tags: Raskolnikov, Literary Analysis]
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The Human Condition: Existentialism in Literature Relates to Religion - Noam Chomsky firmly believes that novels, as well as other literary works, peer deeper into humanity than scientific theory ever will (Chomsky). Literature being a means of introspection is known to be true; a solitary manuscript contains the lives of countless characters. Slowly unearthing details, and remaining helpless as a plot twist unfolds, the reader discovers truths of not only those who cannot leave the paper bound prison, but begins to formulate who they are and how the world has warped the author....   [tags: Human Condition, Noam Chomsky]
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Salvation Through Human Suffering in Crime and Punishment - Salvation Through Human Suffering in Crime and Punishment “All men must suffer, and salvation can not be obtained unless this suffering is present” (Boland, p.4). All of the characters in the novel experience some sort of internal or external suffering. The main character, Raskolnikov, must grow and realize this in order to overcome his conflicts and reach the salvation of peace within. Dostoevsky’s concentration and focus is on why suffering must exist and how this suffering can be conquered. This is found to be true because in the six sections of the novel, only one is focused on the crime, and the remaining five are concentrated on Raskolnikov’s journey to overcome his suffering....   [tags: Crime and Punishment Essays] 1194 words
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Understanding Fate in Oedipus Tyrannos - The Greeks were one of the most powerful empires of early civilizations with the well documented conquest, legends, gods, etc. One of their most significant things left of their empire, is their theatrical style, none bigger than Tragedy. The Greek Tragedy was their basis of Drama and is still studied today. Their view of the world and life could be personified in the plays and by the personages. It is the case in the play Oedipus Tyrannos. The play, written by Sophocles, represents the typical Greek view of the world with all the values that the Greeks wanted to show....   [tags: Greek, Early Civilization]
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Comparing Hegel, Marx, Kant's Views on Pantheism - Comparing Hegel, Marx, Kant's Views on Pantheism 1.Hegel is a pantheist, meaning that he believes that everytng toeather comes to being God. Subsequently he believes that everythenig is one, menatin gtat reason and reality actually are the same thing, fuirtheremore Hegel believst that reality is reason, this is his "first Principle". In contrast to this Kant believes that all we really know are our persc=eptions of the real (Nominal world) and tat we cannot really knowanything aobut the real world....   [tags: Papers] 994 words
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Existentialist Views on Death - Existentialist Views on Death What is Existentialism. Existentialism is a philosophy developed chiefly in the 20th century that attempts find meaning in a seemingly meaningless world. The central theme of existentialism is that an individual must assume all responsibilities for his or her acts of free will without any absolute knowledge of what is right or wrong. Existentialism analyzes this somewhat dismal situation mankind has been thrown into, and produces a model for how an individual should live his or her life....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Papers]
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Existentialism in Catcher in the Rye - Existentialism in Catcher in the Rye The Catcher in the Rye creates an existentialist out of Holden Caulfield by giving him a strong personal opinion, a different sense of view, and isolation. Holden's individuality and his different way of thinking creates within him an Existentialist that refuses to accept weakness but holds sympathy for the weak and vulnerable. The basis for these beliefs lies within the most commonly identifiable theme of existentialism, which states that the philosophy stresses the concrete individual existence along with the individual freedom and choice....   [tags: Catcher Rye Essays] 615 words
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Anxiety in Post Open-Heart Patients - Concept analysis of Anxiety For many decades nursing has been developing tools to assist with development of theoretical and conceptual bases. Concept analysis has been identified by Walker and Avant (2005) as encouraging communication within the discipline it is being research in. Walker and Avant (2005) also point out that “the results of the concept analysis, the operational definition, the antecedents, and the defining attributes can provide scientists with an excellent beginning for a new tool or an excellent way to evaluate an old one” (p.64)....   [tags: Health, Diseases, Theories of Anxiety] 1912 words
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The Fate of Prometheus - The Fate of Prometheus “Ah me, alas, pain, pain ever, forever. / No change, no pause, no hope. – Yet I endure” (I, 23-24) – such are the words of Prometheus, when in desperation and overwhelmed by emotion, his thoughts dissolve in sheer agony and turn to himself, away from the Mighty God whose “ill tyranny” has nailed him to the “eagle-baffling mountain” (I, 19-20). In his essay, Prometheus: The Romantic Revolutionary, Northrop Frye observes that “pain is the condition which keeps Prometheus conscious” (96), because in reflection, he is confronted with himself, and his sense of self and being....   [tags: Prometheus]
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Assessment of the View that it is Rational to Believe that there is a God - Assessment of the View that it is Rational to Believe that there is a God Rational: To be rational is to think logically and within reason. To base your thoughts on evidence, and then use that evidence to come to a "rational" conclusion. Motivation: To be motivated to do or think something, normally the motivation will be because it will benefit you in the long run. Many philosophers use theses types of words when talking about whether or not it is rational to believe in god. Pascal for instance thinks that you should believe in God as you will gain more from it when you pass away if he does exist, i.e....   [tags: Papers] 661 words
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Exploring Existentialism and the Character Leanord in the Film, Memento - Exploring Existentialism and the Character Leanord in the Film, Memento Although Christopher Nolan does not acknowledge any philosophical basis for Memento, the film provides a character, Leonard Shelby, who serves as an example of several aspects of existentialism. Through Leonard, Memento illustrates Soren Kierkegaard's idea of truth as subjectivity, Freidrich Nietzsche's notion that God is dead, and Jean-Paul Sartre's writings on the nature of consciousness. In Concluding Unscientific Postscript, Kierkegaard differentiates between the subject as the knower, and the world (object) as the known: the only way we know the world is through ourselves....   [tags: Movie Film Essays]
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19th Century Theories in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment - 19th Century Theories in Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment "I teach you the Superman. Man is something that has to be surpassed. What have you done to surpass him?" These words said by Friedrich Nietzsche encompass the theories present in Dostoevsky's nineteenth century novel, Crime and Punishment. Fyodor Dostoevsky, living a life of suffering himself, created the character of Raskolnikov with the preconceptions of his own sorrowful and struggling life. Throughout his exile in Siberia from 1849-1859, his sentiments of suffering, sorrow, and the common man surfaced and heightened, inspiring him to begin writing Crime and Punishment in 1859....   [tags: Crime Punishment Essays] 2467 words
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Tyrant and Martyr in Sophocles' Antigone - Tyrant and Martyr in Antigone "The tyrant dies and his rule ends,the martyr dies and his rule begins."  Soren Kierkegaard  This quote applies to Sophocles’ play Antigone in many ways. The two lines can be used to describe the opposition of the two main characters in the play, Creon and Antigone. One is a king new to the throne who will not be ruling for long, and the other, a martyr whose strong convictions will live on even after her death. In the first line of his quote, Kierkegaard states that a tyrant’s reign dies with him....   [tags: Antigone essays] 753 words
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Paradox of Faith - Paradox of Faith In Fear and Trembling Kierkegaard examines the old story of Abraham being commanded by what is perceived to be god to kill his only child. Abraham had spent many years trying to conceive a child with his wife Sarah and finally successfully had a boy named Isaac. In what appears to be the test of ultimate sacrifice god, appearing as a burning bush, asks Abraham to take his only son to the mountain and kill him with a knife. The question most people ask is why would a god command Abraham to commit such an atrocious act....   [tags: Faith] 731 words
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Finding an Existential Ethic - Finding an Existential Ethic   Existential philosophy is subject to a single, seemingly debilitating criticism: it comprises a frame of mind rather than a theory. As Mary Warnock argues in her book Existentialist Ethics, "It seems that to be attracted by Existentialism is to be attracted by a mood. When it comes to serious thought, one may find . . . that it is necessary to cast off the mood and start again" (57). The focus of the existentialist is on the individual, existing being. By nature, the subject of existentialism appears incommunicable....   [tags: Philosophy Religion Essays]
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The Beliefs of Different Ideas of Philosophic Thought - Monism vs. Dualism Believers and non-believers sums up monism vs. dualism. For the non-believer such as Spinoza God just does not exist, that all things can be reduced to a single substance or form. Spinoza believed that it is simple to explain how the body communicates with the body; it is virtually the same thing only conceptualizing from different viewpoints. Nevertheless, there is no life after death; there is only a substance in which we came from. The body is ruled by the laws of physics and what happens to them is determined to what happened before....   [tags: philosophy, ] 1163 words
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Albert Camus’ Concept of Absurdity and Happiness - Introduction In the midst of the problems of the world, no one can deny that human suffering is inevitable, since it has been presented throughout the history of mankind. That life is absurd, indeed as Albert Camus asserts. Since how can one really find meaning in life if we live in a senseless world. Fortunately, three possibilities were presented, that man can choose in order to be released from human suffering. First would be suicide, which is also considered as one of the most serious philosophical problem, since suicide becomes an option for some by ending their life to be released from their sufferings....   [tags: Post Modern Period]
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Faith and Reason: Can They Coexist? - ... I imagined myself in his situation and it made me question what kept him going. What would keep a man who was so new to a country and already facing so many struggles on his feet and pushing forward. When I inquired about this he simply smiled and said to me in broken English that his strength came from three places; the love of his life, his two children, and the faith he had that his god would see him through. According to Pascal there is no way to prove that god exists. He gives use two reasons....   [tags: philosophical, sense, hope, trust] 1070 words
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Analyzing the Impurities of Death - Death is how a person chooses to view it as. It is a beautiful part of nature, while others fear it. It hurts to watch a loved one suffer through an illness. There is controversy determining whether it is moral to assist a patient’s death. Opinions of it being considered murder have risen. One’s body is just material. The soul determines who one is. Religious views toward it seem to overrule the philosophical viewpoint. Morality is based on perspective. A claim is true, so long as it is useful. Physician-assisted suicide should be legal for terminally ill patients....   [tags: medically assisted sucide, the right to die]
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The Philosophy of Existentialism - ‘The most dangerous follower is he whose defection would destroy the whole party: that is to say, the best follower.’ – Friedrich Nietzsche Being recognizable and distinctive nowadays is something most individuals seek after. To become important or standing out in any community is not something today’s individuals have created or whatsoever. Ever since the twentieth century and even before, that belief and eagerness to prove your existence has been noticeably present. Not only between common people has this been there, also philosophers had sincerely thought about that humanly keenness to prove that one is different and essential, and tried to philosophically explain it....   [tags: Philosophy, Nietzsche, Socrates] 1066 words
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The Meaning of Life and Death - The Meaning of Life and Death The abstract idea of life cannot be explained by such simple ideas as being animated, breathing, or speaking. Ordinary machines in this century can perform all of these basic functions. The quandary with defining death is not as abstract and elusive as that of life. The problem of defining life and death has plagued philosophers and the religious bodies for thousands of years for one reason; each philosophy or religion has tried to define the meaning of life and death from only their certain perspective....   [tags: Philosophy Philosophical Human Morality Essays]
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Repetition and the Split of Sign - We follow Lacan and return to Freud, only to find ourselves arriving at the knowledge that the unconscious operates like translating without the original text. There goes a process of representing activity in which we achieve a representation without knowing what is the "represented." Lacan leads us back to so many of Freud's decisive terms, thereby prefiguring the way those terms slip away from the grasp of traditional conceptual discourse. In The Four Fundamental Concepts of Psycho-Analysis we are told that "the unconscious is structured like language" (FFC 20)....   [tags: Linguistics] 2968 words
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A Kierkegaardian Structure to Man's Impetus - A Kierkegaardian Structure to Man's Impetus I do not agree with Frankl. I do not believe Man’s primary driving force is a search for meaning. Nor do I concede with his critics that propose alternative ‘motivations’, such as power, or pleasure. I believe that man has the capacity to be driven by many motivational factors, not just any single one. Moreover, I believe that these motivations represent themselves in a predictable, patterned way. In three of the books we read this summer, it is possible to trace the evolution of the protagonist’s motivations, and their subsequent philosophical state of awareness....   [tags: Papers] 1182 words
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Personal Experience and Conviction: Journal Entry - “Why am I here?” “What is the meaning of life?” “Who am I?” These are all common questions for one to occasionally ponder throughout his or her lifetime. Some people, however, are plagued by those questions, constantly interrogating their life, and its purpose. I, happen to be one of the people who are chronically bedeviled by questions. I want to know what my purpose on this earth is, and why I’m really here. More than that though, I want to know who I am. (insert your name here) isn’t who I am; it’s a name....   [tags: essays research papers] 490 words
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Logic of the Absurds - Logic of the Absurds Man's fundamental bewilderment and confusion, stems from the fact that man has no answers to the basic existential questions: why we are alive, why we have to die, why there is injustice and suffering, all this serve as the impetus for such a thinking. Man constantly wonders about the truth of life and realizes that the more you expect from it, the more it fails you or may be the more we expect from ourselves the more we find ourselves engaging in a futile battle with the odds....   [tags: Free Essay Writer] 1597 words
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God’s Existence - This semester our Philosophy of Religion class took a more broad approach towards the intimate ideas of God. A question we must all ask ourselves; is there a God and if so how can we prove there is. As a class we challenged our minds and throughout possibilities, yet we never really came to an agreeable conclusion, considering the topic it must be broken down. The moral and ethical views will help guide me throughout, along with many other popular philosophical stand points and leaders to sustain and validate my assessments on the subject....   [tags: Argumentative Essay Theology]
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Victorianism and Existentialism - Victorianism “can be taken to mean the parent of the modern” (Landow). The term Victorianism refers to the attitudes, ways, ideas, changes and events of the Victorian Era. “The Victorian Era is generally agreed to stretch through the reign of Queen Victoria” (Miller), from 1837 to 1901. During this period, which was “sometimes called the Second English Renaissance” (Miller), the Victorians faced many modern problems. However, the Victorian Era was an age of power which allowed the Victorians to come up with modern solutions and ideas....   [tags: Philosophy ]
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History of Philosophy - Throughout the semester our class has explored a chronological look at just some of the philosophers whose works have been published over time. Throughout the readings reoccurring themes, such as religion, wisdom, knowledge, reality and life occur and each philosopher offering their own opinions. Given these works, a timeline of viewpoints can be developed and can give a decent view of the shape of philosophy over time, as well as offering insight to how the time period and location may have shaped the views of philosophers....   [tags: informative essay] 1350 words
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20th Century Liberalism's Philosophies are False - During the 20th Century, liberalistic philosophers created countless numbers of false philosophies that many people practice today. Among those wrong ideologies are existentialism, secularism, pragmatism, and Freudianism. The first false ideology, existentialism, claims that there is no truth and believes that all man can do is take a ?leap of faith.. This ideology claims to ?resolve. all man?s problems and worries because ?nothing is true.. Because there is no truth, therefore, there would be no God and, therefore, there is no wrong in the world....   [tags: essays research papers] 361 words
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